Tag Archives: Toby Burnham

Sunken treasure recovered.  An old #schooner Rudder housing.  Brought up off #GloucesterMA Harbor

This is called a Gudgeon, it attaches to the wooden rudder and attaches through the hole to the pintle.

Brought in by Toby Burnham Aboard The Jupiter II

To get an idea where this would reside on a Schooner or Brig check out our friend Tugster‘s Post here-

Most Restless

Vessel designer Gerald de Weerdt here takes measurements today to attach rudder to hull via pintles and gudgeons.

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and this from-

ARCHAEHISTORIA

WWII Historian and Shipwreck Researcher

http://www.archaehistoria.org/new-zealand-sites/32-union

The 158 ton brig Union would have been very similar to this one. This is the 162 ton, 90 feet long, wooden brig Annie Brown, which trading around South Australia from 1875. Source: p. 136 of “Sail in the South” by Ronald Parsons, Wellington, AH & Aw Reed, 1975

Brampton Pintle

A bronze pintle with three through bolts from the 1823 wreck of the 432 ton sailing ship Brampton. The item was recovered by Kelly Tarlton from the wreck site in the Bay of Islands. This item was sold at Webb’s auction no. 862 in November 2002. Note as photographed the pintle is upside down. The Waimahana Bay trademe pintle did not have through bolts but was fastened by rudder nails and lag bolts instead.

More Reading about Gudgeon and Pintles- whats interesting here is this one from

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~maav/maid.htm

 

One of the rudder gudgeons raised from the site, MM-3-31-2-1 (illustrated) accords with the dimensions for lower pintle diameter (2 1/2 inch) given in the Lloyd's Survey Report.(Drawn by: Geoff Hewitt)

 A Snow Brig. The Mountain Maid was a strongly built wooden snow brig. She had two square rigged masts and a smaller sail called a spanker, behind the main mast.
A Snow Brig. The Mountain Maid was a strongly built wooden snow brig. She had two square rigged masts and a smaller sail called a spanker, behind the main mast.
(Based on a line drawing from Ships Rigs & Rigging, H. A. Underhill. Nautical Press, Glasgow. Colorised by EFL.)

So I contacted my friend Will (Tugster) and he had a more intriguing information and photos to add to this-

Hi Joey–

Wow!  My filing system works, and I located these photos about 5 minutes after I started looking.

The story is this:  after a storm in spring (?) 1988, Mike Magnifico–then manager of Salisbury Beach State Reservation/Beach saw this as he was surveying beach erosion.  He thought–he said later–those were gold, and the color is not exactly true in the photos.  He called the Newburyport Maritime Museum, who called me, because I was Mr. Shipwreck before I was Tugster.  I wet to Salisbury Beach, took the photos.  A friend is standing in photo 1 to show scale.

I pursued it a while;  a maritime archeologist up at Plymouth State (NH) looked it over carefully and declared the pintles made of  “yellow metal” but further identification would likely not be possible.  Last I knew, almost 30 years ago, Salisbury Beach Reservation kept them rather than donate to the N Maritime Museum.

Exciting.  Feel free to post on GMG any text and photos.

Cheers

When you coming down to NYC?

Will

So the Gauntlet Of Gross Has Been Thrown Down–Eating A Beating Striper Heart

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So this youngster aboard the Connemara Bay thinks he can out gross the master- Toby Burnham?

How will Toby respond to such disrespect for the gross out game that this youngster has shown?  Has the elder statesman of gross not earned a little more respect than to be called out in a 11 second YouTube video? Stay tuned for Toby’s response.

From the website of Connemara Bay Fishing Charters

How to: Eat a beating striper heart

It is not the first time and probably will not be the last time we see an angler kick back a striper heart like a shot of whiskey.

Dana Wensberg was sure to get all the taste from this one as he chewed before swallowing. He also called out a local lobsterman, Toby Burnham, who frequently entertains tourists by biting the heads off of rotten herring

This back from 2009 when the youngster was probably still wearing diapers.

Toby Burnham- The Seagull Whisperer

So yesterday this Homie was on the roof of Toby Burnham’s lobster boat The Jupiter II with a striper plug with it’s treble hooks stuck in its leg and abdomen.  it was stuck hobbling around and in obvious pain.

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Toby was inside the cabin oblivious to the condition of the seagull and when he popped his head out the seagull flew off the roof of the boat and onto the roof of our dock here at Captain Joe and Sons.

Toby grabbed a piece of herring and lured the injured seagull back down off the roof of the dock and just as the seagull got within striking range he snatched it by the tail and held it by it’s neck.

 

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Then grabbing a pair of metal cutters he snipped the treble hooks to remove them from the feet and abdomen without tearing the belly out of the seagull.

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Moments later he was on the deck eating a piece of fish scraps Toby fed him.

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A job well done just a week after his 50th birthday.

Nice work Toby!

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Nice work Toby!

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Look Who’s 50! Our Buddy Toby Burnham!!!

Toby is one of the funniest, nicest guys you’d ever want to meet.  Salt of the earth lobsterman.  We’re lucky to get to deal with him every day- always entertaining!

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Click pic below to watch the video-

click the picture to view the chat

Toby is a good egg.  He walks to his own beat but is a super nice guy.  For some interesting posts featuring Toby (and they’re all interesting if they feature him) click this text.

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Salmon Racks Aboard The Jupiter II

Fish racks make excellent lobster bait.  When the tides are running the racks hold in the bait bags much longer so the lobsterman knows his gear is still fishing when other types of bait may have washed out of the trap.

Salmon Racks Aboard The Jupiter II

Salmon Racks Aboard The Jupiter II

Marbled Lobster Landed By Toby Burnham Aboard The Jupiter II

I took this picture juxtaposed against a bunch of regular lobsters so you could see just how different they are.   Toby Burnham on the Jupiter II caught this marbled lobster a couple years ago and landed it at our dock.

To see the ocean oddity slide show which I added some more blue shaded lobster, and quadruple clawed claws to you can click this text

Peter Prypot has a wonderful article today in the Gloucester Daily Times about another one that was caught by John Symonds of Essex.  You can read the article by clicking this text

Here you can see just how wild they look when placed next to a normally colored lobster-

Skate Wing Ghosties

Toby Burnham, skipper of the Jupiter II brought in these “Ghosties”  they are actually pieces of the cartilage of a skate wing that are unaltered but look just like characters from Casper The Friendly Ghost.

Skatewing Ghosties, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

This is a skate wing-


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