Tag Archives: tall ship

THE BEAUTIFUL OLIVER HAZARD PERRY COMES TO GLOUCESTER!

Wanna guess where the Oliver Hazard Perry is Right Now? You don’t have to – click the link and you’ll see she’s here!

(Thank you Joey for adding this link!)

oliverhazardperrylocation

Wow and double wow! What a treat to see this splendid ship up close!!!

Oliver Hazard Perry ship -1 copyright Kim Smith

Many thanks to Paul Morrison and his sister Kathy. Paul called a few days ago with the very generous offer to show me the osprey nest on the Annisquam, spotted by Kathy, about half a mile from the Marina, and best seen by boat. On the way to see the nest, we spied the Oliver Hazard Perry just beginning to make its way into Gloucester Harbor. Paul, again very generously, suggested we detour out to see the arriving tall ship. And it is a beauty! The Oliver Hazard Perry will be in Gloucester Harbor for one night only however, look for its return in September, when it will remain in Gloucester a few days. I believe, at that time, folks will be able to tour the boat!

Oliver Hazard Perry ship -5 copyright Kim Smith

The Oliver Hazard Perry is the largest civilian sailing vessel in the United States and the first of its kind to be built in over 100 years. Its mission statement is to, “provide innovative and empowering education-at-sea programs to promote personal and professional growth.”

Read lots more about the Oliver Hazard Perry on the ship’s website here.

Oliver Hazard Perry ship -8 copyright Kim Smith

About the ship, from the ships’s website: The hull for this new ship was initially begun in Canada and continued at various shipyards in Rhode Island since 2008. These included; Promet in Providence, Senesco in North Kingston,Newport Shipyard and she is now being commissioned in Portsmouth at the Hinckley Marina. Once complete she will move to Newport to the new dock at Fort Adams.

The Check out the construction of our vessel through our blog or through Narragansett Bay Shipping.

We are grateful for the support of a number of marine trade partners who have been an instrumental part of this magnificent project.

The ship is named for Newport’s War of 1812 naval hero Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. SSVOliver Hazard Perry is owned and operated by the non-profit Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island, and represents Rhode Island and our rich nautical heritage wherever she goes. Her home port will be Newport and she will sail the world as an ambassador of our proud state.

The success of SSV Oliver Hazard Perry relies on the generosity of donors and supporters, both large and small, from individuals and businesses to corporations, so please consider making a generous gift or donation today.

Objectives

  • Build and maintain Rhode Island’s own tall ship that is the largest, privately owned active Tall Ship in the US.
  • Offer sail training programs for all ages.
  • Develop and teach sea-oriented educational programs for secondary and college level students.
  • Provide pre-professional training for individuals wishing to make their careers at sea.
  • Work with Rhode Island marine trades to establish training programs and to create job opportunities.
  • Represent Rhode Island in American and foreign ports.
  • Display and interpret the ship’s history for the education and enjoyment of the general public.

Gorgeous tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry sailing into Gloucester @ohpri

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

Continuing with ” reruns” while in Mexico, the Parade of Sails is another favorite event. So looking forward to this year’s Schooner Festival!

See original post on GMG, September 2, 2013:

Video: Time Lapse Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

Video: Time Lapse Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

The taller ships start appearing around 1:50, but I liked seeing all the smaller boats, too. Look for the Stanley Thomas lobster boat closer to the beginning. After the Parade I walked out onto the rocky ledge near the Eastern Point Lighthouse, but as you can see in the second-to-last clip, a thunderstorm was on the way and I had to skedadle.

Beautiful Event to film-to many of us, Gloucester is our “somewhere over the rainbow.”

Up Close.

Up Close

A Unicorn under repair

The STV UNICORN, High and Dry

A wise man never plays leapfrog with a unicorn.
— Tibetan proverb

Stv Unicorn

The STV Unicorn from Harbor Loop

The STV Unicorn at Sunset

Visit the STV Unicorn Website for more Info click below

http://www.tallshipunicorn.com/index.html

The Kalmar Nyckel at the State Fish Pier!

The Kalmar Nyckel is a full‐ scale re‐ creation of the original 17th‐ century ship, whose historic significance rivals that of the Mayflower. The present day Kalmar Nyckel serves as the Delaware region’s floating Academy and Goodwill Ambassador. The ship provides a unique platform for the Foundation’s educational programs, offering the best in recent scholarship and experiential learning. Students get to experience the “Age of Sail” first‐hand during the Kalmar Nyckel’s floating classroom programs, helping to set sails, heave cannons, steer the ship, navigate with 17th‐century instruments, and learn about America’s maritime and colonial history.

The original Kalmar Nyckel was built by the Dutch in or about 1625 as a “Pinnace” – a class of vessels that could operate either as small warships or as armed merchantmen. This was the “Golden Age” of Dutch naval power and seaborne world trade, and the Dutch were the most advanced naval architects and shipbuilders of the 17th century.

photos by Sharon Lowe

Measuring 93 feet on deck and with a sparred length of 141 feet, she was stoutly built and remarkably seaworthy, characteristics that would serve her well throughout her long and remarkable career. Her original armament probably consisted of 12 six‐pounder cast iron cannon, with two smaller swivel guns attached to the quarterdeck rails.

The Kalmar Nyckel was purchased from the Dutch in 1629 by the Swedish cities of Kalmar and Jönköping and given her new name. The name means the “Key of Kalmar,” which derives from the 12th‐century castle that guarded Kalmar harbor, a fortress defense the ship was meant to honor and augment.

The Swedish Empire reached its zenith under King Gustavus II Adolphus (1611‐1632), the greatest war leader of his age, known as the “father of modern warfare,” whose battles are still studied in military schools. Gustavus wanted to enhance Sweden’s position as a Great Power and to secure his recent territorial additions around the Baltic. This would require the building of a navy to match his powerful army.

Read more here…