Tag Archives: Snowy Egret

GOOD HARBOR BEACH SUNRISE SCENES AND PIPING PLOVER NEST!

Good Harbor Beach Sunrise -2 Gloucester MA copyright Kim SmithPiping Plovers nesting -4 Gloucester MA copyright Kim SmithAn approximately six foot in diameter protective barrier has been installed around the plover’s nest. This is a huge relief as many of us have noticed dog tracks in the cordoned off area. The plover’s don’t seem to mind the wire construct and go about their morning routine, running through the spaces between the wire grid as if the barrier had always been in place. In the above photo, you can see a plover sitting on its nest between the two clumps of grass within the enclosure.

Piping Plovers nesting Gloucester MA copyright Kim SmithEvery morning the plover’s switch places several times, with both parents taking turns sitting on the nest, while the other leaves the restricted area to feed at the shoreline and bath in the tide pools. The above photo was taken on the 13th of June, before the barrier was put in place. There are minimal tacks around the nest site, so it would be logical to assume the nest was very recently established. The photo below, taken on the 15th, show many more tracks and it looks like there are three eggs.

Piping Plovers Three eggs Gloucester MA copyright Kim Smith

Piping Plovers Two eggs Gloucester MA copyright Kim Smith

Nest on the 16th, I only see two eggs however I think the plovers move the eggs around in the nest. And too, my camera lens is zoomed all the way, and the image is cropped.

Piping Plovers nesting -3 Gloucester MA copyright Kim SmithThis morning the plovers were easily slipping through the wires.

Twin Light GHB Sunrise copyright Kim Smith

Snowy Egret Good Harbor Beach copyright Kim SmithSnowy Egret Good Harbor Beach -2 copyright Kim SmithSnowy Egrets fishing at the GHB tidal river this morning.

 

SNOWY EGRET ENCOUNTER

Snowy Egret Egretta thula copyright Kim Smith

It’s not often that a wild bird permits such a close encounter. The Snowy Egret was drinking, feeding, and bathing at the pond edge. At one point a noisy family appeared and began throwing stones into the water. All the Mallards swam toward the far end of the pond and the egret retreated up into the trees. As soon as the family departed, the ducks and Snowy returned to the beach, resuming business as usual.

Snowy Egret Egretta thula -12 copyright Kim Smith

Snowy Egrets forage on mostly aquatic animals including frogs, fish, crustaceans, worms, and insects. The vivid yellow feet are often used to probe in the mud for prey.

Running back and forth along the shoreline while hunting, several times plunging in and becoming completely submerged.Snowy Egret Egretta thula -14copyright Kim Smith

Snowy Egret Egretta thula -15 copyright Kim SmithDuring breeding season the Snowy Egret develops beautiful wispy curving plumes on its head and back. A great deal of time was spent smoothing and arranging its feathers.

Snowy Egret Egretta thula -13 copyright Kim SmithSlender and elegant, the Snowy appeared smaller than a duck when its neck was tucked in.

Snowy Egret Egretta thula -21 copyright Kim SmithSnowy Egret Egretta thula -11 copyright Kim SmithSpiraling to dry its feathers.

Heron feet copyright Kim Smith

Look What Andrea Holbrook Captured ~ A GLOSSY IBIS IN GLOUCESTER!

 

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Andrea writes, “OK , because of where I work — Gloucester — and amazing bird photos posted by friends — that would be you Kimberley Caruso and Kim Smith — I find myself stopping to shoot shorebirds with a camera. Spotted Thursday morning at Grant Circle, a glossy ibis and two snowy egrets. Not great photos but I had never seen a glossy ibis before!”

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Thank you so much Andrea for sharing your photos of the stunning Glossy Ibis. It’s breeding range in the Western Hemisphere is quite narrow and I would love, love to capture this species on film. Keeping my eyes peeled thanks to you!

From the Mass Audubon website, “In Ancient Egypt, ibises were venerated as sacred birds. They were believed to have a connection to the deity Thoth, the wise scribe and lorekeeper of the Egyptian pantheon. While Glossy Ibises are not literate, they are marvelous travelers. The Western Hemisphere population of this species represents a fairly recent arrival to the New World, believed to be descendants of birds who flew from Africa to South America in the early nineteenth century (Davis & Kricher 2000). Read More Here

 

Birds of Cape Ann: How to Tell the Difference Between a Snowy Egret and a Great Egret

Great egret Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2014Great Egret

For the Chief, and anyone who wants a quick and easy reference on how to tell the difference between the Snowy and Great Egrets, both white and both often times found feeding in the marsh and tide pools together. The Great Egret is greater in size and has a bright yellow bill, with black legs and black feet. The smaller Snowy Egret has the opposite markings, with unmistakeable cadmium yellow feet and a black bill.
Great Egret Snowwy Egret how to tell the difference ©Kim Smith 2014

Snowy Egret and Great Egret

In the above photo taken this morning, the egrets were too far away for my camera’s lens to get a really clear picture however, when cropped, you can see a side-by-side comparison. The Snowy Egret, with black bill and bright yellow feet, is flying in the background and the Great Egret, with black feet and yellow bill, is perched.

Great Egret lobster Cove Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2014Great Egret Lobster Cove

More posts about Great Egret and Snowy Egrets:

BIRDS OF CAPE ANN: GREAT EGRET VS. GREAT EGRET

BEAUTIFUL GOOD HARBOR FOGGY MORNING SUNRISE, SNOWY EGRET, AND WHIMBRELS

Birds of Cape Ann: Great Egret vs. Great Egret

Great Egret Gloucester - ©Kim Smith 2013Great Egret (Ardea alba)

On a gorgeous dawn this past season I filmed an epic battle between two, possibly three, Great Egrets at the Good Harbor Beach marsh. The battle lasted nearly ten minutes with the defending egret aggressively flying lower and beneath the intruder, preventing it from landing anywhere on the marsh.

Great Egret Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2013

Great Egrets have interesting breeding behavior in that the male selects the nesting site and builds a platform nest of sticks and twigs in a tree, shrub, or on the ground near a marsh,  prior to selecting a mate. Both parents incubate the eggs and feed the chicks, and both male and female vigorously defend the nesting territory. Perhaps that is what I had observed, a male and/or female defending their nesting site.

Great Egret Gloucester Massachusetts ©Kim Smith 2013

The Good Harbor Beach victor first surveyed the marsh from his perch on the adjacent cottage and, after determining his foe was defeated, swooped to the tide pool below to feed peaceably alonsgide the Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron Great Egret Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2013Great Blue Heron and Great Egret

Read More Here: Read more

Beautiful Good Harbor Foggy Morning Sunrise, Snowy Egret, and Whimbrels

Good Harbor Beach Sunrise ©Kim Smith 2013

Good Harbor Beach Sunrise -2 ©Kim Smith 2013.The sunrise in the lifting fog at Good Harbor Beach this morning looked at times more like a moonrise.

Snow Egret Good Harbor Beach Gloucester MA ©Kim Smith 2013.A lone Snowy Egret was eating and fluffing its feathers and a pair of Whimbrels (at least I think they were Whimbrels) were fishing and bathing along the tide pool edges.

Whimbrel Massachusetts ©Kim Smith 2013.Good Harbor Beach Sunrise ©Kim Smith 2013. copy

Good H -4arbor Beach Sunrise ©Kim Smith 2013.Good Harbor Beach Gloucester

endangered and threatened species from mary barker- and a Poll

Hi Joey,

I had the unexpected pleasure of finding some Snowy Egrets, which are a threatened species, while I was killing some time in Ipswich last week.  One male was vying for the attention of 2 females.  He was putting on quite a show.  I also had the good fortune to encounter 8 Lady Slippers, an endangered species, while hiking in So. Hamilton.  I did not have my tripod with me to get super clean shots, but thought they were worth sharing.

Mary Barker

Editor’s Note from Joey-

When the person who named the Lady Slipper The Lady Slipper thought to themselves- “Hmmm what shall I call this magnificent flower?” and then came up with “Lady Slipper” I’m trying to figure out how they didn’t name it a Lady Vagina.

Lady Slipper…  Really?

When you look at it can you honestly tell me that looks more like a slipper than a a vajajay?

That thing’s got Lady Vagina written all over it.  Like you know how the term white rice perfectly describes white rice?  That’s the way I feel about the Lady Vagina. It’s misleading to name it a Lady Slipper- Borderline criminal actually.  False advertising 101.

In fact I think we ought to start a campaign to have the flower renamed so people don’t get confused.  It’s only right.

Lady Vagina FTW

Poll Time!

lady slipper 1lady slipper 2

 

 

 

lady slipper

snowy egret male in full display snowy egrets taking off snowy egret female