Tag Archives: Sargent House Museum

$463,141: City Council okays 14 CPA grants for 2016. Info meeting for 2017 application February 8th

Congratulations to the 2016 (round 7) awardees!  Their final presentations were at City Council on Tuesday.

 

Since Gloucester voted to approve the Community Preservation Act (CPA) in 2008, the city has administered 7 rounds of funded projects throughout our community. Have a look at who you helped fund in 2016

  1. North Shore CDC and Action, Harbor Village *missing this photo but great presentation!
  2. Cape Ann Amateur Radio Association, Wheeler School House & GFD Riverdale Hose, No 2
  3. Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Civil War Monument
  4. Generous Gardeners, Stacy Boulevard Gardens
  5. Stage Fort Park Advisory Committee, Welcome Center Renovations
  6. Community Development Dept., Stage Fort Park Beautification Project
  7. City Clerk’s Office, Archives Initial Storage Project, Phase I
  8. Oak Grove Cemetery, Oak Grove Cemetery continued restoration
  9. Gloucester Committee for the Arts, “Out of the Shadows: Gloucester’s historic Depression Era Mural” preserve & restore murals with refined project scope,discovery and schedule of work
  10. Historic New England, Beauport Museum, outer building roof replacement
  11. Sargent Museum, Preservation of porch, granite steps & retaining wall
  12. Gloucester Writers Center, Preservation of Maud/Olsen Library & GWC Archives
  13. Maritime Gloucester, Rehab & Restoration of the railway
  14. Friends of Burnham’s Field, Continued rehab of Phase I of Burnham’s Field Restoration

Safe bet you might know someone assisting one of these projects. Who else helps?  The volunteers on the Community Preservation Committee are fantastic: Catherine Bill Dugan, Catherine Schlichte, Henry McCarl, David Rhinelander, John Feener, Barbara Silberman, Heide Wakeman, Ellen Preston, and Scott Smith. There’s no break for this committee. From start to finish the process from an applicant’s perspective takes nearly a year. Depending upon the project, it will involve assistance from the Community Preservation Committee, City staff and various departments, City Council, City Council sub committees, and the administration.  Just as one round winds down, the next year’s process and round of applicants gears up. Visit the Community Preservation Committee page on the City website to learn more about the CPA and to see prior projects.

Save the date:The Community Preservation Committee will be hosting an information meeting for prospective 2017 applicants at Sawyer Free on  February 8, 2017 at 6pm. Applications are due April 17, 2017.

Debbie Laurie, a Senior Project Manager in the Community Development Department who manages Grants and CPA for the City writes about the info meeting: “We want to help guide applicants through the process and answer any questions you may have before filling out an application.  We can also determine if your project is actually eligible or not.  Please pass the word around if you know of anyone that may be interested. “

Proposed building plans Sawyer Free Library, City Hall…Whoa! In the news plus the 1973 appeal led by Joseph Garland, universal access, and archives

“No finer place for sure, downtown.”

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“Fate of historic buildings uncertain” Gloucester Daily Times, Ray Lamont, Jan 3 2017

Seeing double? Yes, you’re supposed to. The Sawyer Free Library addition was designed to mirror Cape Ann Museum as a balanced and nuanced architectural symmetry in deference to City Hall, and catalyst for a graceful center.

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Cape Ann Museum, December 2017

 

Sawyer Free Library has announced a public meeting January 11th for discussions of a new building. (See the flyer at the end of this post.)

City Hall may have some upcoming construction on the Dale Avenue side as well.

Both projects are largely in the name of accessibility of a physical nature. Can they be cost effective, worthy of our history and culture, protect our significant buildings, and address current and future needs? The following are some of the issues, local coverage, links to resources, and archival material for your interest.

HANDICAP PARKING SPACES BY CITY HALL- Do we have enough?

Although there are several new handicap parking spaces along Dale Avenue by City Hall, carving out the landscape on the left for more spots is in the cards because of grant money. Why? Several people told me that Dale Avenue parking spaces are hazardous for anyone exiting on the street. Although I do not want to minimize any pressing needs, I still ask, “Really?” Have we become so car dependent we would rather a thoroughfare here than the elegant streetscape we have (once a tree lined walk from the train station.) I was also told that it will increase visitation counts. It is an unfair advantage that historic sites with access to more funding (Monticello, Smithsonian, Colonial Williamsburg, and more) are better equipped to face these seemingly no-win situations. But there are creative retrofitting options for Gloucester, too.  Universal design is about balance, not chasing funding sources at the expense of preservation and beauty, nor backwards planning.

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Dale Avenue c.1910

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City Hall, December 2017

 

 

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The site of possible razing and paving

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NEW LIBRARY 2016. And 1973.

Before the current 2015-16 library outreach, the library hosted extensive visioning sessions throughout 2013. I went to a couple, and I was invited to take part in a focus group (on schools and the library.)  A completely new library and jettisoning of the historic Saunders library building was not an expressed community value. What were some common discussion points? A strategy for digitization of historic archives and newspapers, more staff, more hours of operation (Sundays), better bathrooms, parking issues, air conditioning, electrical work, maintenance, security, maximizing technology/ content access with schools, ditto Cape Ann TV, and attendance (see this great video from Lisa Smith by kids for kids ) were some goals that were mentioned.

So it was a surprise to see the unveiling of new architectural renderings that did not showcase the Saunders house. It’s like the White House not featuring the White House. I think the Saunders house should be key and central to any building overhaul, not tossed aside. Providing universal access should preserve the intended awe factors if there are any, FOR EVERYBODY–such as the architectural details, proportion, welcoming entrance and unique heritage of a historic building. In this proposal, with Saunders severed there is zero physical access to the main event. What a missed opportunity. And for a library. What do you think?

Today’s paper mentioned that the Saunders house could be used for other purposes instead of the library. Why can’t that be the case and the library maintain its #1 asset? The downtown cultural district (which is not going forward in the same capacity) and other organizations could use the library meeting spaces. Do we really need to conjure up another stand alone endeavor?

Back in 1973, the Trustees of the Library began a fund drive for the new library addition; the city of Gloucester paid 2/3. As the Library’s General Chairman, Joe Garland led that campaign. Not surprising, the text of the brochure is a good read! The architect was Donald F. Monnell. (In 1971 Monnell was quoted in the papers speaking about the attributes of Central Grammar.  One likes him more and more.) The population served was 27,000–nearly what it is today.

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Awesome design  on this 1973 brochure for the fundraising campaign for the Sawyer Free library– led by the Joe Garland (cover). See photos of complete pamphlet

 

 

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See “Preserving our Civic Center,” great letter to the editor by Prudence Fish, Gloucester Daily Times, December 23, 2016

 

Working together

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2016 Planning term and movement- “Scaling Up”

A quip about the concept of Scaling UP that I remember from a conference this past September at Peabody Essex Museum and hosted by Essex National Heritage was to “think about the farm not just a barn”; in this case a downtown, or an entire city and region. I like thinking this way in general–architecture and planning, art, and schools. But this conference pushed me to add overlays beyond my areas of expertise or focus like wildlife and waterways. Gloucester, Cape Ann, Massachusetts–there’s so much! Mayor Romeo Theken is committed to working together and feels that planning is important and broad. One example, see Gloucester Daily Times Dec 19, 2016 Officials: City to Prioritize Its (competing) Needs 

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City Looks to Prioritize its Needs, Gloucester Daily Times, Ray Lamont, Dec. 19, 2016

There are several looming questions, evaluations, and decisions.

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Every era has choices. The prior library expansion plans began well before 1972. Possibilities swirled as they do now. (Back then, Central Grammar was also in the news, may or may not have been razed, and possible uses favored senior housing, commercial development, an annex to City Hall, and a courthouse police station.) Today there are competing building needs and uses floated for properties as diverse as: the Cape Ann YMCA on Middle Street, the post office on Dale, the Gloucester Fire Department, police headquarters, St. Ann’s, and the elementary schools–and that’s just to name a few. Let’s celebrate enviable architectural strengths, and not fuss with buildings that should be venerated, unless it’s to help them be accessible and healthy. Let’s get the balance right.

HISTORY MAKING PLEA- Archives for all

The prohibitive costs of best practice historic preservation (ADA compliant, temperature and humidity controls, security, sustainability, in house scanning/OCR/audio transcription, etc) is impossible for all the worthy collections in town, and pits them as foes when vying for funds. Let’s flip that impediment on its head and make Gloucester a model for the state.  Its treasures would be available worldwide if they were truly accessible –digitized.Two words may help accomplish this goal and free up cash for individual operations: shared overhead. It’s one hope I continue to stress–the need to share necessary resources for a state-of-the-art research and warehouse repository. This universal hub should be large enough to encompass any holdings not on view. There could be a smaller downtown central site combined with a larger off site location, such as at Blackburn. The list of sharing institutions could include and is by no means exhaustive: our municipal archives that date back to 1642; Cape Ann Museum; Sawyer Free Library; North Shore Art Association; Beauport; Hammond Castle; the Legion; Amvets and other social clubs; Sargent House; several places of worship; Gloucester Daily Times; Annisquam historical building collections; Lanesville; Magnolia’s historic collections; artists/writers estates; Veterans office; our schools; Isabel Babson Memorial Library, and perhaps businesses such as Cape Pond Ice and Gortons. The library plans don’t appear to retrofit their site(s) for this goal.

If incentives and policy supported neighborhood character over less generic construction collages51

that would be wonderful.  It’s not just Gloucester.

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Read more

Art museums in Massachusetts are closer than they appear. Gloucester, Google maps and upcoming exhibitions

 

museums-in-massachusetts-in-google-maps-by-catherine-ryan

Last week I was in the Amherst area to meet with clients at a museum. I added on a couple of exhibitions that I knew were closing before I’d be back in that area. I have to map out shows or I miss them.

If you do an online search for ‘art museums in Massachusetts’ or ‘best of’ museum inquiries there are several helpful lists that pop up. The New England Museum Association for one has stepped up their digital presence for their membership directory. Still, must-see institutions on the North Shore and Cape Ann are rarely high lighted, buried deeply, and frequently absent from compilation lists ( see omissions at Artcyclopedia, Massvacation, Tripadvisor, visit Massachusetts, art-collecting, etc.)

Here’s a link to Massachusetts Art Museums created in Google maps. Part 2 Massachusetts 2016 fall/winter museum exhibition guide coming!

Upcoming show trends include: illuminated manuscripts, citizenship, art of picture books, and vintage and contemporary photography.

 

 

 

Sargent House Museum Fundraising


Exciting news! We’re over a third of the way to our goal of the $15,000 needed to present unique programming and preserve the House for future generations. 
Thanks to those who’ve already generously donated!
But, if you have not yet given, we still need your help.


Your contributions support… 

  • Expanding educational programs and internships for students and adults
  • Outreach to increase tour attendance at the Museum
  • Digitizing our database of museum objects and photographs
  • On-going preservation and restoration of a glorious 18th-century home

Please give generously so that these exciting projects can continue.

Thank you!

Middle Street Walk At The Sargent House Museum Dec 13,2014 11-3PM


This Saturday!

From 11A-3P, see historic Sargent House finely decorated for the holidays as you shop for gifts, greens and more! Snack on holiday treats and enjoy our family-friendly programming:

  • Listen to music provided by Rockport High School musicians, led by director Nathan Cohen.
  • Happening at 1:00PM at the UU Church (see map & inset below): Dramatic reading of “Mingling of Souls from Sorrow to Joy.” A one-act play by Jay DiPrima about the lives and writings of Reverend John Murray and Judith Sargent Murray. (Suggested donation $5.) Afterwards, walk with the actors to Sargent House.

For more information, visit our website: www.sargenthouse.org/events

Sargent House Museum is #11 on the map.
UU Church is #12.
(Click on map for full Middle St. Walk program.)

QUESTION for the GMG audience

QUESTION for the GMG audience: If The Sargent House Museum remained open
beyond our summer season on one weekend day, which should it be?: Saturday?
Or, Sunday?
Please message us and give us your preference. Thanks!

email here- development@sargenthouse.org

Kimberlee A. Cloutier-Blazzard, Ph.D.
Development Associate | Sargent House Museum | http://www.sargenthouse.org

 

Sargent House Museum

Posted on April 25, 2009 by Joey C

Sargent House Museum Video Tour Part II

Posted on April 25, 2009 by Joey C

Sargent House Video Tour Part III

Posted on April 26, 2009 by Joey C

Sargent House Museum Tour Part IV-

Posted on April 27, 2009 by Joey C

Other Sargent House Museum Posts on GMG Here

Reminder from Lise Breen About the Upcoming Sargent House Event


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Hello Friends,

I am sending a reminder that The Sargent by the Sea event is this Friday at TS Eliot’s boyhood summer home. Don’t miss the chance to take in Tom’s view with cocktail in hand. Our community has rallied to offer great art and wonderful events in order to support Judith Sargent Murray’s mission. We are so thrilled!

Please enjoy a spectacular summer evening with us and click the Sargent House website to purchase tickets.

I very much hope to see you there. Let’s spy porpoises snoring on the phosphorescent swell; the predictions are for Kingfisher weather!

Lise

Kingfisher weather, with a light fair breeze,
Full canvas, and the eight sails drawing well
We beat around the cape and laid our course
From the Dry Salvages to the eastern banks.
A porpoise snored upon the phosphorescent swell,
A triton rang the final warning bell
Astern, and the sea rolled, asleep.

T.S. Eliot draft written in reference to Cape Ann.

 

Sargent House Museum Block Party Pics

Dear Joey,
Barb Silberman asked that I send along some photos from Block Party at the
Sargent House Museum. This was a big night for us because this was the first
time Judith Sargent Murray’s plays have returned to life after 200 years.
North Shore Folklore Theatre, Co. made this possible by performing Act 5 of
"the Traveller Returned" (1796). To round out the evening, we had some folks
in costume, catered supper picnic boxes from Beach Gourmet, and historic
lawn games.
Thanks, Joey!
-Kimberlee

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Sargent House Museum Presents “Ornaments of the Mind” April 14 at 2pm

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Sargent House Museum
Presents: “Ornaments of the Mind: Needlework and a New England Girl’s Education”
49 Middle St., Gloucester
Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 2PM
Laura Johnson, Associate Curator of Historic New England, will present a lecture on “female academies” of the early 19th century founded by women like Judith Sargent Murray, Judith Saunders and Clementina Beach.  Girls learned the “useful and ornamental arts” of reading, writing, and arithmetic as well as painting in oils and watercolors on fancy surfaces and plain and fancy needlework.
The Sargent House Museum recently acquired an excellent example of this fancy needlework, presented to Nancy Parsons Sargent by her nieces Anna Williams and Julia Maria Murray, Judith Sargent Murray’s only child.  The work depicts Cornelia, a model of what the Romans called “civic” motherhood, with her children, exclaiming that they were her real treasures.  Judith Sargent Murray, a product of the Enlightenment, and the American Revolution, was one of the first writers to extoll the virtues of “republican motherhood,” the practice of mothers teaching their children the new ideals and values of the early American republic.  The needlework was handed down through the Sargent family and donated by Virginia Pleasants.  Her niece will discuss the Sargent family connections.
The public is welcome at the lecture and at the public unveiling and installation of the piece that will follow.
A free will donation is suggested; members will be admitted free of charge.


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Interested in Helping with the Historic Garden at the Sargent House?

Come join a group of garden-loving volunteers at the Sargent House Museum who work 1-2 hours a week making the garden shine. Volunteers receive a free tour of the fabulous home of Judith Sargent Murray, first feminist writer in the New World.  Please come join us between May 31 – August 26 on Thursdays  11 am-2pm, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays noon-4 pm. Flexible schedule.  Contact Jo-Ann Michalak 781-729-9052.

Blue Lilac ‘President Grevy’

Syringa vulgaris ‘President Grevy,’ hybridized by Lemoine in 1886. “Pure blue, immense panicles of sweetly scented starry florets.”    -Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities!

Artists in the Sargent House Museum Garden Today

Joey: I will be one of two (due to rain last Sunday) featured artists in the garden of the Sargent House Museum, this Sunday, August 14, from 12-4PM. I hope that you are able to post this event. Your blog is valuable publicity for so many people, especially artists!

We are:

Dorothy Englander, who will be drawing and painting in watercolor and ink

www.dorothyenglander.com

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and Mary McCarl, who will be working in watercolor.

http://www.rockyneckartcolony.org/_artists/mccarl.php

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We will have works available to purchase. This event is part of a celebration of "Contemporary Artists at Historic Sites." Sargent House Director Kate Laurel Burgess-Mac Intosh conceived of this collaboration of the old and the new. It is a special opportunity for visitors to observe contemporary artists at work in a historic setting. The museum is located at 49 Middle Street, where it can be entered; the garden and the museum are accessible through the wrought iron gate on Main Street as well (next to La Trattoria).

We look forward to the weather cooperating, and to seeing many people there to see our artwork and to visit the museum.

Thank you,

Dorothy
Dorothy Englander
www.dorothyenglander.com
http://www.nyartistscircle.org/artists/englander/englander.html

http://tinyurl.com/museumcollection

Call to Artists at The Sargent House Museum

Dear Joey,

I write to announce an exciting opportunity for artists at The Sargent House Museum.

Artists are invited to participate in Here & Now: Contemporary Artists Working in The Sargent House Museum Garden, a series providing working artists with an opportunity to interact with the residents and visitors of Cape Ann.  Artists are encouraged to set up and work on their art in the garden, to talk to the public, to engage individuals in the artistic process, and expose individual work to a wide and varied audience, while working on and selling their artwork.

Best, Kate Mac Intosh

Artists are invited to participate in Here & Now: Contemporary Artists Working in The Sargent House Museum Garden, a series providing working artists with an opportunity to interact with the residents and visitors of Cape Ann. Artists are encouraged to set up and work on their art in the garden, to talk to the public, to engage individuals in the artistic process, and expose individual work to a wide and varied audience.

The Sargent House Museum will provide artists with access to a restroom, a sink, and a refrigerator on site (for lunches). An eight-foot fold table will be available for use but must be covered to avoid damage from art materials.

Artists are encouraged to bring printed materials, such as postcards and business cards, for distribution to interested parties while they are working. Artists are also welcome to sell work while working in the garden; all transactions must be completed by the artist.

Artists will be provided with materials on The Sargent House Museum, which must be on display while they are working on site. Artists are also required to encourage guests who stop by to come into The Sargent House Museum for a guided tour of the site. Artists will be provided with visitor coupons with discounted admission for use that day.

Artists will be given Sunday dates on a first come, first serve basis. The series is weather dependent, as The Sargent House Museum does not have an appropriate indoor space to move art activities. If an artist’s selected Sunday is cancelled due to weather, The Sargent House Museum will make every effort to reschedule the day, but cannot guarantee the ability to reschedule.

Artists should arrive at The Museum thirty minutes prior to their event start, at 11:30 am. Artist must stay for the entire four -hour period, and must make their own arrangements for breaks/coverage of their set up space. Artists must breakdown and clean up their materials by 4:30 pm. Artists are required to carry out any trash that results from their art-making process. There is also no power available outdoors, so please plan accordingly.

If you have any questions, or would like additional information on the Here and Now series, please contact The Sargent House Museum’s Site Manager, Kate Laurel Burgess-Mac Intosh, at kburgess1@mac.com or call 978-412-5290.

www.sargenthouse.org

Rediscover the Sargent House Museum

REDISCOVER THE SARGENT HOUSE MUSEUM

The Sargent House Museum Opens for the 2011 Season with a

Rejuvenated Interpretive Tour, New Art and Artifacts on Display,

and a Presence on Facebook and Twitter

Invigorated with a new interpretive story, The Sargent House Museum is now open for the 2011 season. Artifacts and artworks have been rearranged, and woodwork, walls, and the exterior of the building have been repainted, to illustrate the inspiring story of Judith Sargent Murray, and the visitors and occupants of her famous home.

Highlights of the renewed interpretive tour include a room devoted to the Reverend John Murray, Judith’s second husband, and a reinstallation of the John Singer Sargent Gallery, which features both paintings and drawings by the famed artist, as well as a unique opportunity to see one of his painting palettes.

Guests’ favorites, including Fitz Henry (Hugh) Lane’s Watch House Point, the glorious main staircase of the house (coveted by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in the early 1900s), and the Sargent family’s Paul Revere silver, are also still on view, integrated into the storyline of the home’s one hundred, thirty-five year residential history.

Seeking revitalization and dialogue with the community and visitors, the Sargent House Museum has a Facebook Page, highlighting upcoming events, the Museum’s collection, and Judith Sargent Murray’s writing. The Page enables followers to get updates from the Museum, and provides an opportunity for a two-way conversation between those behind the scenes and the general public. The Museum is also on Twitter, @TheSargentHouse.

“We’re looking forward to a fresh start with this new season,” said Barbara Silberman, President of the Board of Directors of the Museum. “We’ve spent the winter bringing new portraits out of storage, and making changes to the interior. We hope you will join us for a tour, an event on the lawn, or talk with us on Facebook and Twitter.”

Built in 1782 for Judith Sargent Murray—an early feminist writer, philosopher, and social activist, the Sargent House is a fine example of high-style Georgian domestic architecture, enlarged during the Federal period, and converted into a museum during the height of the Colonial Revival.

Click the photo below for my photos from The Sargent House Museum

Cape Ann Museum, Sargent House Museum, and Historic New England Program at the Cape Ann Museum May 14th

Museum presents Historic New England Lecture


In partnership with Historic New England and the Sargent House Museum, the Cape Ann Museum presents a lecture exploring the life and work of William Sumner Appleton, founder of Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities) on Saturday, May 14 at 3:00 p.m. In 1910 when Appleton founded the organization, the New England preservation movement was still in its infancy. This talk, given by Historic New England’s Senior Curator of Library and Archives Lorna Condon, focuses on Appleton’s preservation efforts in Gloucester and Cape Ann. After the lecture, walk down Middle Street for a reception and abridged tours at the Sargent House. This program is free and open to the public.
The Cape Ann Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Museum is closed during the month of February, on Mondays, and on major holidays. Admission is $8.00 adults, $6.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Children under 12 and Museum members are free. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. For more information please call: (978) 283-0455. Additional information can be found online at www.capeannmuseum.org

Sargent House Museum Restoration Under Way!

Sargent House Museum

Joe Nap

Joseph Napolitano
Replacing Sill

Work is underway on the restoration of the Museum’s exterior.
In this photo, general contractor Joseph Napolitano, of NAPCO, Inc., is replacing a sill on the building’s north side.  In the coming weeks, other carpentry repairs and structural work will be completed.
The building is prepped and primed and ready for a new coat of paint.
Partial funding for this project is provided by the Massachusetts Cultural Council through its Cultural Facilities Fund and the Tower Family Funds.
Donations welcome.  This is a big project!!

Sargent House Museum

49 Middle Street Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930

978-281-2432

Sargent House Museum Writing Closet Exhibit Thinktank

Hi Joey,
The Sargent House Museum would like to invite people to tour Judith Sargent Murray’s writing closet this coming Saturday at 11am and 2pm.  It’s one of only four remaining in the U.S. and the place where she wrote some of her most important work.  We are interested in the thoughts and questions that people have about the space.  The Musuem has a small grant to develop an interactive exhibit focused on the writing closet and Judith Sargent Murray.  Email us at sargenthouse.org if you’re interested in attending one of the tours.
Thanks for helping us get the word out!
Judith Nast

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