Tag Archives: Rockport

NORTH LIGHT THACHER ISLAND SUNRISE

Cape Ann has been blessed with stunning sunrises and sunsets this winter, or perhaps it’s just that the weather temperatures are warmer than usual, which makes it much more fun to be out and about photographing. Fifties today and despite the overcast skies, the day was divine!

North Light Twin Lights Thacher island 2016 www.kimsmithdesigns.com

DO SWANS DRINK SALTWATER?

Male Mute swan Cygnus olor www.kimsmithdesigns.com copyright 2016In the above photo you can see our super smart Mr. Swan drinking freshwater from snow melting on the roof above its head, which was running down the gutters and into the harbor.

Mute Swans mostly drink freshwater (and a great deal of it) because most of the places that you find swans living at are on freshwater ponds, lakes, rivers, and inlets. However, just above the eyes and under the skin, swans have a gland that enables them to drink saltwater. This gland removes salt from their bloodstream and concentrates it into a solution that is excreted from their nostrils, which the swan can shake its head to clear.

There are a number of good folks in Rockport and Gloucester who keep a watchful eye on our local swans. Thursday I had the joy of meeting Lois and Serena, who have been feeding and observing the swans for over twenty years. They have photos of Mr. Swan (known as Buddy in Rockport) dating from 1998. He was already full grown by then, which makes him at least twenty years old. That is quite extraordinary as most Mute Swans in the wild live on average only to twelve years of age.

My deepest thanks and appreciation to Lois and Serena for the time they took sharing swan stories, the reading material lent, and for their kind and goodhearted nature, especially towards Buddy/Mr. Swan!

As you may or may not have read here on Good Morning Gloucester, I have been filming the swans over the past several years for a film project. If you have a Cape Ann swan story that you would like to share I would love to hear from you. Please contact me at kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com. Thank you so much!

RISING SEA LEVELS: HENRY’S POND AT RISK

Penzance Rd Henry's Pond Pebble Beach -4 ©www.kimsmithdesigns.comPenzance Road

Climate change is complicated but the damage done from rising sea levels is very apparent in our own community. With the inundation of seawater upon freshwater ponds, vernal pools, and wetlands, at risk especially are habitats for fish, shellfish, wildlife, and plants.

Penzance Rd Henry's Pond Pebble Beach -3 www.kimsmithdesigns.com

Penzance Road, the narrow strip of land that divides Pebble Beach, on the Atlantic side, and freshwater Henry’s Pond on the opposite side, is periodically closed because of storm damage. I don’t recall ever seeing this degree of destruction however, we have lived here for only twenty years. It would be very interesting and much appreciated to learn from any of our readers who have lived through some of the worst blizzards and hurricanes to hit Cape Ann to compare the levels of damage.

Penzance Rd Henry's Pond Pebble Beach -2 www.kimsmithdesigns.comThe waves surged clear across the road and into freshwater Henry’s Pond.

Penzance Rd Henry's Pond Pebble Beach www.kimsmithdesigns.com

 

Penzance Road is flooded with sand and rocks and is closed.

A photo posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Notes About iartcolony Gallery from Leslie Heffron

Hi Kim,
Tess Atkinson photographTess Atkinson –  She does photography on a large scale often face mounted to plexiglass and back mounted to aluminum. (Cherry blossoms)
Judith Scott LarsenJudith Scott Larsen – description taken from the gallery’s facebook page:  “Her work incorporates the figure as an empty vessel which is infused with a series of images from the history of art and science. The images are made by projecting transparencies onto the blank canvas of the human body. The projections reference various cultural inscriptions, biological patterning, and diagrams by visionaries attempting to understand the nature of our humanity.”
12190048_990096397703919_8039902911545492662_nHope you like the little owl!
 
Leslie
EDITORS NOTE: iartcolony gallery is located at 42 Broadway in Rockport.

Rockport: Bearskin Neck, Dock Square and on up the hill for those last minute Christmas Presents.

There were carolers this weekend but most of the stores I hit were going to be open all the way to Christmas Eve. So that pair of earrings or feather boa, salad bowl, or nutcracker, or that weird gift, the big stone thing to put in the garden and put a candle inside.

Bearskin Neck is a must but make sure you make it all the way down main street because there are gold mines of goodies all through town.

 

The best part is easy in and out. Rockport meters are all covered and plenty of street parking available.

bearskincarolers

The little drummer boy said barampuh bu bum.

PHOTO OF MISSING WOMAN SUSAN NILSSON

womanSusan Nilsson of Rockport is described as white, 5’5″ tall, 130 pounds, and with green eyes. She was walking on Rocky Neck Friday night. Police found personal items belonging to her on a dock and in the water. Anyone with information about her disappearance is encouraged to call Gloucester Police at (978) 283-1212.

Afternoon Walk on Old Garden Foot Path

The boys and I took the two dogs for a walk down the street, along the Old Garden Foot Path, and on to Marmion Way to visit a friend.  Along the way I took this quick photo of Rockport’s outer harbor.  The photo somewhat mimics the very same view that our friends have from their upstairs window.  When I showed it to our friend he said, “Sometimes we get numb to the fact that we live here.”

So, for all of you who may have become numb to the fact that we live in such an unbelievably beautiful place…. Here’s a reminder.

IMG_1150.JPG

Santa Claus Comes to Rockport

I posted a few “live blog” photos of Santa’ much awaited arrival, but here are several more.

Such a fun tradition.  It is so fun to watch the boys, and all of Rockport’s children, get older each year as they stand on T-Wharf and await Santa’s arrival.

This was our 9th “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and the novelty has certainly not worn off.

COWS GRAZING AT ROCKPORT’S WARING FIELD!

Cows Seaview Farms Rockport ©Kim Smith 2015More often we see cows grazing in Ipswich, not along 127A in Rockport. I think I’m in love with these wonderfully friendly cows! They were nuzzling up to each other, pointedly asking to be licked. The smaller cow on the left licked the larger cow until it fell asleep, standing up! They were all doing this communal licking, which looked more like a massage-lick because their tongues are so thick and muscular. The eight cows have been grazing at Waring recently and I believe they are from Seaview Farm.

Cows Seaview Farms Rockport -2 ©Kim Smith 2015Cows Seaview Farms Rockport -3©Kim Smith 2015 Waring Field ©Kim Smith

See more photos here Read more

Video: End of the Season By Leslie Heffron

Hi Joey, The season’s winding down in Pigeon Cove. Here’s a one minute slice of life on the waterfront late Sunday afternoon.

Editor’s note: the season is far from over for everyone except the small part timers. We’re actually in the heart of it.

The Paper House

The Paper House

Many of you have probably visited The Paper House at one time or another if you grew up in Rockport or Gloucester.  I remember visiting it as a child when my grandmother (God only knows how she found it) took us there.  My mother and I went to visit it again yesterday.  It is a cool tucked away little treasure in Pigeon Cove, well worth a visit if you’ve never been, or a nice memory to return to if you haven’t been in years.  It was built by Elis and Esther Stenman, who must have been a very unique and interesting couple.  You can learn more about it at http://www.paperhouserockport.com/index.html.  It seems to always be open, and is run on the honor system, where you leave your $2 admission in a metal mailbox by the front door of the main house.  There are signs, but it is a little tricky to find.  From Rockport, take left just before you reach the Tool Company, go up a little and take a left and then your second right (watch for signs).  It is #52 Pigeon Hill Street.  Coming the other way, take the right up a hill, right after you pass the Tool Company, then first left and second right.

If you look closely, the 2nd photo includes The Boston Post edition from April 16, 1924, in which the Sox apparently lost with 24,000 fans watching.

E.J. Lefavour

WHAT’S THE ART DISPLAYED BEHIND GOVERNOR BAKER? Here’s a tip for all those political handshake photographs: please add the artist and art to the list of names

Cat Ryan submits-

Joey, Good Morning Gloucester is really something! After my post about local artists and art displayed in City Hall and the White House Collection, the artist, proprietor, FOB, and fun Pauline Bresnahan sent me a picture with a note. She was thinking about art at the State House:

“Yesterday the Mayor was sworn in at the State House (for the Seaport Economic Advisory Council) and she put some photos on FB and I was wondering who did the painting over the Governor’s shoulder in the photo that I attached and am sending to you?”

Here’s Pauline’s attachment

https://gm1.ggpht.com/IZ4fCXxXy5iDiwitCBA6o4aiYEYFLJCY9BJ6UJwJab3A_x2Gs4GH7NUEhuv_jA5918aM6XUN-Agrsxmjimt9mMImZe46sKYWXmBVwWFkt7X1yOPPL8Js5oKSzftP4BTz0sWaFWNPXGvyt430nFCURL127FAXMkfQfl_siBB45jqf6lgMz0ltD6vcEsT0c6WQoBIrhgFVhoVvW1IKq5rYWJwQ6mhgfP8qP9ktyS2oXMtMIygPFnhptDCOn5uJnASwaOMRE1lEShCrJ4aVBm3fFrNOIJRTe7Pj1RrQ5nRWasDLnnP4ETcHuksc3v4HD19LBZXeKoTUe7u1D8SV25IRb7a4xfuYh2VkJhb1z0JGKS3-vvl3YVo1HyWsJN4KJcIio_y3YF4h790jI_RzU1c2T8Fq9TdrIGg-pmrCmhbxJSE5h96iTbuOcavv9_BhNpd9kitlRt4QfhRZh8ExAcf7swcIzpR2_8HtcZ2em3GmmiVXqErUh8RA_gIQuhZOvwQgOvXdviEYjtxf8Ei3vGvy2kgQP0ZIF1VI7jSgX2MUeBCm1OtP8NhF8MxT6fMbkP0SctKI4h2UUwjnw1gEkavFqalKSES9YmnJ_EOLCOenYIEtqo0Vw5Ar3R6oJzIn=w480-h640-l75-ft

The dramatic harbor scene is on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and was created by JONAS LIE (1880-1940), The Fisherman’s Return, ca.1919, John Pickering Lyman Collection, Gift of Miss Theodora Lyman.

You read that correctly. His name is ‘Lie’. I know, located in the State House—the state capitol and house of government—the symbol of the Commonwealth of MA, politics and its people—it may seem at first an unfortunate selection when you read the surname.

Not to worry, his painting skills and life story are a great fit for the State House.

Lie was a well-known early 20th century painter and his peers considered him a master. One example of his stature and connections: Lie, Stuart Davis and Eugene Speicher were charged with the selection of paintings as members of the Central Arts Committee for the legendary exhibit, American Art Today at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. Holger Cahill was their Director. Artists John Gregory, Paul Manship and William Zorach selected sculpture. John Taylor Arms, Anne Goldthwaite and Hugo Gellert selected the prints and drawings.

Is there a Gloucester, MA, connection? You bet –and one you can see in many of Lie’s works. He was a summer traveler to Cape Ann before WW1 along with other New England locales through the 1930s because he was a mainstream American artist of his time. He had a studio on Bearskin Neck and lived on Mt. Pleasant in Rockport. Later the studio was Max Kuehne’s. 

Lie was born in Norway to an American mother, Helen Augusta Steele of Hartford, Ct. His Norwegian father, Sverre Lie, was a civil engineer. One of his aunts was the pianist Erika Lie Nieesn and he was named after an uncle, the major Norwegian writer Jonas Lie. After his father died in 1892 he went to live in Paris with family, before joining his American mother and sister in New York City the following year. They settled in Plainfield, NJ. After art studies, Lie found work as a shirt designer, took more classes, exhibited and received prizes. William Merritt Chase bought two works in 1905. In 1906, he traveled back to Norway to visit family and again to Paris. He was deeply inspired by Monet. When he returned he resumed his art career. He admired the Ashcan artists and their American style. Another trip in 1909 to Paris, Fauvism and Matisse. 

Lie painted the engineering project of his time, the building of the Panama Canal. The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Detroit Institutes of Art acquired a work from this series. The rest were eventually gifted to West Point in 1929 as a memorial to US Army Corps of Engineers Colonel George Washington Goethals, Chief Engineer of the building of the Canal. Goethals was credited with having the forethought to ensure that a record of the project was preserved in art. Art form(s) actually. Leave it to the engineer to appreciate the art and beauty in industry. Right?

Lie was invited as a guest of General Goethals along with Joseph Pennell who created the gorgeous etching portfolio The Building of the Canal, 1912. Goethals also selected artist William B Van Ingen to paint 4 large murals, mounted on site in the rotunda in 1915. The Panama Canal opened softly the preceding year, on August 15, 1914 as World War 1 eclipsed any coverage.

Lie was involved with the installation of the famous Armory show of 1913, and 4 of his works were exhibited. In the printed matter, his name shows up alphabetically between Fernand Leger and George Luks. See the 1914 journal advert. Charles Hawthorne urged summer students to Provincetown while the New York School of Fine and Applied Art hoped that students would paint with ‘Jonas Lee, one of America’s foremost painters’.  He was quite active in the arts community. He organized the Society of American Painters in 1919. He purchased a home in the Adirondacks to be near the hospital where his wife sought treatment for and eventually succumbed to TB. In 1933 he gave Amber Light, a painting of FDR’s yacht to the President, his friend.

Lie is known for his vivid color and impressions of New England harbors, boats and coves, painted during summer visits, his New York City scenes, landscapes, seasons, Utah copper mines, and the Panama series.

What about the Governor’s suite, the historic restoration, the Governor’s portrait, protocol and tradition?

The Massachusetts State House includes the state legislature and the offices of the Governor. The 1798 building was designed by Charles Bulfinch and was designated as a National Historic Landmark* in 1960. This magnificent landmark needed an overhaul and major renovations. Restoration has been happening throughout the structure, mostly for the first time in a century.  It’s difficult to invest in heritage and modernize facilities without public criticism. Years of research span terms. The Governor suite in particular came under fire for its historic restoration. It was expensive.

“The executive office now looks like it did in 1798, Petersen said. It cost $11.3 million to renovate and restore these 19,000 square feet of the State House, including the lieutenant governor’s office, constituent services on the second floor, and what will soon be an emergency response room on the fourth floor. The executive offices now have temperature control, wireless Internet capability, sprinklers, blast-resistant storm windows, security cameras, including some with facial recognition, and sensors that can detect if a room is occupied.”

Daunting! I can understand why Governor Baker selected the former Chief Of Staff’s office for his everyday office. “I want a regular office where I can spill a cup of coffee and not worry about it,” the governor said.

The Jonas Lie painting is prominent in nearly every ceremonial signing and photograph because it’s hung directly behind the Governor’s desk. It is difficult to find any mention of the artist and painting. When staging formal photographs if there is a featured artwork in the frame, it is my recommendation and hope that credit to the artist and artwork are listed along with people featured in the photograph.

The State House is working on their website and there’s a great virtual tour. Visit https://malegislature.gov/VirtualTour

So what does the Governor see from his vantage of the signing seat during ceremonies and meetings? More tradition, history, and art. Each incoming Governor selects a portrait of a former Governor which is installed above the mantel and across from the desk.  Former Governor Patrick’s choice was John Albion Andrew, Massachusetts 25th Governor. Governor Baker selected former Governor John A. Volpe, a North Shore Wakefield native, who served 1961-63 and again 1965-69, the first 4-year term in MA. He resigned midterm in his final year to accept President Nixon’s appointment to head the Department of Transportation. You can read more about it here http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_massachusetts/col2-content/main-content-list/title_volpe_john.html

The incoming Governor selects this portrait fairly quickly. Volpe’s national policy led to Amtrak. With the winter and MBTA crises at hand, comparisons can be drawn…I will ask! I haven’t been in the Governor offices. But Fred Bodin and I had a great look around earlier this year and Senator Tarr gave us a brief impromptu tour. Ask him about the Cod. There was an installation of local artists in the hall outside the Senate Chamber. 

*Boston has 58 properties with National Historic Landmark designation. Gloucester has 2: Schooner Adventure and Beauport. City Hall should/will have this designation.

Link to yesterday’s post https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2015/08/11/this-is-what-gloucester-looks-like-at-the-white-house-and-city-hall-its-all-local/

Also find it at Joey_C’s twitter http://t.co/upEgxcTajq

« Older Entries Recent Entries »