Tag Archives: PUBLIC ART

Gloucester: Dancing in the street Aug 13 and

Dancers from American Travelling Morrice perform twice August 13th- once at St. Peter’s (2:30pm) and later Harbor Loop (6:15pm). They’re on their 41st tour which you’ll read on as you wander; this poster I snapped was displayed at Jalapenos. I wonder who created the woodcut? I also wondered if multi-talented Rose Sheehan, Cape Ann Contra Dance, was involved. Yes. And her son Colin de la Barre (another name befitting a pursuit!)  Gloucester Daily Times has the story.

You might fill your Aug. 13th  dance card. Whether audience or participant, one could make it a daylong celebration of beauty, sport and nature. Not 41 years, but pretty darn close, the Celebrate the Clean Harbor Swimis 38 years young and scheduled earlier that morning. Reminds me: check the GMG calendar for options. Every weekend in Gloucester is like First Night. A few of the other special events planned for August 13: Cape Ann Museum has a walking tour and White Ellery contemporary installation. Cape Ann Community Cinema features two films. Gloucester Stage has a live theater show for kids in the morning and 2 shows for Songs For A New World (one is pay what you wish).

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I bet you can reel off  a few of the chart topping rock groups circa late 1970s.  Who knew that there was a 1979 American folk dance held in St. Ann’s parish hall? The dances were started by Patricia and Norris Marston who hoped to build interest for regular square dances in Gloucester and perhaps raise funds to hire bands. One night Roger Whynott was a featured caller. On another evening it was Charlie Webster calling out folk, square and contra. – Gloucester Daily Times  

Gloucester street art is an all star

Worcester, the host city for the Ma Smart Growth Conference, is Massachusetts’ second largest city and pretty pumped with a 500 million investment in their ‘city square’ area. The city invested 8 million dollars into their ‘streetscapes’, including a skating rink. “10,000 came out for themed skate nights!” I’ve heard skating rink wishes mentioned once or twice in Gloucester: discussions pro I4C2 or somewhere on Middle Street (“a scene nearly Currier and Ives!”) and why isn’t the O’Maley skating rink used by the students? “We used to use it for gym? It’s an amenity right there.”

Other conference talks focused on investment in public space and public health. Worcester aims to earn the distinction Healthiest Community in MA by 2020. They have the first and only accredited public health department so they’re investing in a core culture.  The conference speakers spoke about housing, planning, walk-ability, return of multi-generational family households, and diversity. Millennials say: “Where do I want to live?” and then go. Their parents’ said “Where is the job?” and relocated. We were told many times that millennials are different than boomers: they don’t like traditional offices and buildings for work. They would rather walk, bike or commute by train. Ideally their life radius would fall within one mile, a neighborhood scale. How does that affect consolidating schools vs neighborhood schools and other debates ensued.

From a planning perspective: “Does the investment action help to encourage sprawl or does it invest in your community?”

 

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The session “Is Housing a Municipal Budget Buster” was led by Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport and panelists included former Gov. Glendening and Umass Dartmouth Director of Public Policy, Michael Goodman. Most questions went to Mike Hogan, who gave a talk about Oceanspray’s residential venture in Plymouth, Redbrook Village. Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce brought him here to speak to our communities a couple of years ago.  He said to say hi to Peter Webber🙂.

The second session I attended focused on arts and planning and was led by artist (ceramicist) and planner, Jennifer Erickson with Kenneth Bailey, Design Studio for Social Intervention (D24SI) and others.  A projected slide loop featuring model national art projects scrolled continuously. I was so caught up in the briefs that I nearly missed one picture from Gloucester: the monumental Parsons Street mural by James Owen Calderwood. Congratulations James!

Cruz Ferreras took the photograph during a block party; there’s a Cape Ann Art Haven painting in progress and kids leaping. Since that photo, street lighting and more art was added, a second monumental mural, painted by children, under the direction of Cape Ann Art HavenThe Gloucester Fish Net mural was a temporary commission that is lasting because the road is primarily used for walking. (Also, the artist painted it over a second time, and widened it.) With funding, Cape Ann Art Haven art center  or an individual artist like Jason Burroughs (who assisted James Owen Calderwood) could re-paint the mural. With funding and fresh sealcoating, we could issue a Call for a new work of art. There are several more walls along Parsons Street that could be a wonderful matrix for murals, or the streetscape for a dance or theater production. 

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Art and money: Boston Creates chaos and Clara Wainwright Boston Globe op ed

A draft of the coveted 10 year master arts and culture plan for the City of Boston dropped in May a dud, despite– or because of –its $1.2 million price tag.  There’s a lot of pressure riding on Boston Creates final report, postponed until this coming Friday, June 17th. Boston is not alone in its struggles over funding and competing demands. Boston Creates and the ‘Art Czar’ fever did contribute to a climate of planning mana mania that found its way into Gloucester and other cities and towns. Boston Magazine writer Patti Harrigan profiled the year of Boston Creates, warts– no all in the article, “Boston’s Creative Crisis”:

Marty Walsh’s $1.4 million Boston Creates plan was supposed to turbocharge the city’s arts scene. A year after its launch, are we ever going to get anything other than a series of kumbaya sessions and generic platitudes?” 

She does a good job covering some of the reasons. I can add more.  Another perspective was an op-ed piece penned by Clara Wainwright for the Boston Globe. You may know her work with the celebrated 1998 quilt series: “Protecting the Oceans That God Has Created,” by Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association members including Lena Novello, Angela Sanfilippo, Fino Sanfilippo, and Nina Groppo. I am confident you have heard about another iconic project she established.

First Night founder and artist with Gloucester ties,  Clara Wainwright, weighs in on Boston Creates. Her column “A Way Forward for Boston Creates” was published on June 2, 2016, excerpt below:

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“Members of the arts community are praising Mayor Walsh’s Boston Creates, a 10-year master plan for the city’s cultural life, but are concerned about funding. The result of interviews with leaders of large and small arts organizations, and of community brainstorming in Boston’s neighborhoods, the Boston Creates report was directed by Julie Burros, the Mayor’s new cabinet-level chief of arts and culture. In presenting a draft of the report (the final is due to appear June 17), Burros pointed out the broad, rich scope of the plan, but warned that there was minimal funding to carry out some of its goals. I was again reminded of the recent Boston Foundation report that placed Boston last of 10 major cities’ support for the arts. Why such a sad warning, when Boston’s arts organizations and artists have been so clever and resourceful over the years?

In 1970 the Institute of Contemporary Arts invited city agencies and community organizations to come up with projects. The parks commissioner wanted a huge bell on Boston Common, which children could ring by swinging on its rope; a community health center wanted a mural for its waiting room. Artists were invited to choose one of many project ideas or submit a dream of their own. A large array of their ideas were exhibited in City Hall, which then had an art gallery. Mayor White’s Office of Cultural Affairs and the city’s financial community were encouraged to fund those selected. Boston Gas saw Corita Kent’s proposal for a billboard and commissioned her to paint a mural on one of its tanks.

Currently, Artists for Humanity provides instruction and small salaries to 200 high school students in a state-of-the-art building in South Boston. Zumix gives East Boston children musical instruction, the opportunity to perform, and a recording studio and a radio station. Both organizations were initiated by dynamic young women in the 1990s on minimal budgets. Some of their funding today comes from corporate commissions for murals, graphic work, and performances.

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2016 Smart Growth conference #MSGA16

I’m in Worcester, MA, attending the 2016 Smart Growth Alliance conference (I was an invited speaker at a prior conference.)  The conference brings city planners, transportation and civic innovators, real estate and housing professionals, business leaders, non-profits, architects, Great Neighborhood and gateway cities, and –well, let’s just say a wide range of (primarily) policy folk.

It’s surprisingly enjoyable.

This year, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito is the key note speaker and we’ll hear from Worcester the host city. Other headliners include Michael Hogan President & CEO of AD Makepeace Company; Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport; Dan Burden the ‘walkability guru’; Parris Glendening former MD Governor and President of Smart Growth America’s Leadership Inst; Veronica Eady, VP Conservation Law Foundation; and Monica Tibbits-Nutt, Executive Director 128 Business Council. There will be more than 70 speakers. Attendees often fan out in groups to cover more panels.  I’ll report back where I’ve landed.

One topic that will swirl in the background concerns housing and a landmark bill S.122 proposing changes to planning, zoning and permitting. The organizers support this in a big way. Director Andre Leroux writes, “We believe that the (legislators) have done a thoughtful job balancing the needs of municipalities, developers, and the environment. “

With two-thirds of Millennials desiring to live in walkable, transit-accessible places at the same time that seniors shift to apartment living, suburban communities have a real test before them.  Communities like Newtonville need to decide between planned growth and unplanned growth. For its peers like West Concord village, Winchester Center, Andover and Newburyport, the future is already happening.” Quite a dishy prompt.

The Boston Globe endorsed the bill, you may have noticed the title: “Make Room for Granny, and other zoning fixes.” Granny does live longer than Grandpa.

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BREAKING NEWS: HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016 and the titles are…

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THIS JUST IN FROM ROB:

July 13 ::: Grease
July 20 ::: Finding Nemo
July 27 ::: Minions
August 3 ::: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
August 10 ::: Inside Out

“And up to 2 more screenings if we raise the dough!” – Rob Newton (love your new logo by the way!) Email Rob CapeAnnCinema@gmail.com  with any sponsor questions.

Love that Gloucester’s out the gate and announcing their free summer movies. Mark your calendars! And no balloons noted–will pass that feedback along.

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HARBORWALK SUMMER CINEMA FREE MOVIE NIGHTS ON THE JUMBO SCREEN START JULY 13.

PUBLIC ART: O’MALEY ELLSWORTH KELLY, PART 2 FROM CAT RYAN

We have great teachers in Gloucester! For Ms. Mulkern

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“I put those posters in my classroom windows to minimize the intense sun that streams in at certain times of the day – I was thinking Ellsworth Kelly when I saw them from outside – but Piet Mondrian works great!” –  Joanna Mulkern ESL Teacher/O’Maley

Thanks for adding the motivation behind your window design. Oh, yes!  I see Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015), too. And your comment pushed me to think about other visual artists such as Anni Albers, Edward Landon, Sol Lewitt, Al Held– and Matisse and Calder (who Kelly looked to.) Plus your Kelly comment relates to the architecture at O’Maley and Kelly’s years in Paris at the time of Le Corbusier’s influence. O’Maley is a bit red-brick bauhaus and other architectural styles. Does anyone know the architect?

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Ellsworth Kelly’s Sculpture for a Large Wall, 1957, installation shot at Matthew Marks Gallery (now in MoMa)

 

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Ellsworth Kelly’s Sculpture for a Large Wall (Transportation Building Lobby Sculpture), 1957 original commission for the lobby of the Pennsylvania Transportation Building, Penn Center, Philadelphia, PA. It was sold to Ronald Lauder in 1998 when the building was redesigned. Jo Carole and Ronald eventually donated it to MoMa.

 

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Installed at Matthew Marks Gallery (top photo) then Barnes Foundation in 2013 (this photo) prior to current installation at MoMa

 

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Le Corbusier Museum, Zurich Switzerland

 

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Le Corbusier Foundation Firminy France

 

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HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016: Free movie nights on the jumbo screen start July 13

ghw summer cinema blankSave the dates! Five free movie nights to begin on Wednesday July 13th. Movie titles coming soon.

Rob Newton, Cape Ann Community Cinema and Stage, is securing great movies for the 2016 line up. What do you think will be on his list? Here’s a look back at the first two series.

 

FLASHBACK 2015

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FLASHBACK 2014 TITLES

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Tomorrow Mayor Romeo Theken #pocketpoem by Peter Todd

What poem will you select to carry and share tomorrow for National Poem in Your Pocket Day  April 21, 2016?

Mayor Theken selected Little Child, a poem by Peter Todd, Gloucester Poet Laureate 2014-15.

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City of Gloucester Mayor Romeo Theken National Poetry Month

Mayor Romeo-Theken encourages Gloucester students to send their original poem to the Office of the Mayor, 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA, 01930 at any time throughout the year. She promises to read them! Students should include their name, which Gloucester school, their grade and teacher’s name.

For arts and culture, add your name to sign up sheets that are happening NOW or  email sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov.

 

More Poem in Your Pocket around Cape Ann 

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BREAKING NEWS: Mayor Romeo-Theken announces arts email hotline

Bob Ritchie Dogtown Books

Mayor Romeo-Theken opens an email for arts and culture! Together we’re going to connect what we have with what we need.

Use your phone to email directly to the Mayor sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov

Add your name to sign up sheets that are happening NOW

email subject line: artist studio space Fitz Henry Lane

Per Mayor Theken initiative to help with requests from city residents that need studio space– the City of Gloucester will be offering FREE  shared space at the Fitz Henry Lane House during the day in month blocks.

email subject line: Public art

Residents- We are keeping a list of residents who have a project idea for the city  or  have questions such as available sites and locations or funding. 

Organizations/Places of Worship/Business- Please let us know if you have available free space such as interior or exterior walls, windows, parking lots. We have requests for: displays, street art, pop up movie nights, artisan markets, performances, studio space, programming. Maybe we can make a match. 

Send or text an image! Do you have a favorite corner, steps, view, from your Ward or any spot in Gloucester that you think would be a good one for creative arts project (temporary or permanent)– or maybe it’s one that should be left alone.

email subject line: hot topic St. Peter’s Square LOCAL MARKET one day a month

Mayor Theken is talking about putting the town square back into St. Peter’s Square to go with the block parties. The idea is a local market by residents for residents. There’ll be tables and chairs to hang out. Pick up some local fish & lobster, crafts, flowers and vegetables during the day. At night sit and relax, have some coffee, listen to soft music. Email if you want to join the planning or have questions.

Mayor Theken wants to give a couple of shout outs:

Awesome Gloucester for supporting so much art and culture.

She is really excited to welcome and is looking forward to working closely with Martha Wood, Project Manager, Gloucester Arts and Cultural Initiative.

Ward councilors are holding meetings next week in YOUR neighborhoods. They work hard. The Mayor is going. Can’t go? No problem. Use that email. The Mayor  is committed to assuring that citizen voices are amplified, assessed and acted upon. Every resident matters!

Ward 2 and 3 April 19th @ Sawyer Free

Ward 1 April 20 @ Gloucester Stage

Ward 5 April 21 @ Magnolia Library

Ward 4 April 25 @ Lanesville Community Center

 

 

 

Boston Globe complimenting Gloucester’s gorgeous WPA era murals

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Did you see? Wonderful John McElhenny’s My View article to the Gloucester Daily Times thanking great work by the CPA committee and residents? And more this week in the Boston Globe? Nice to be the successful model. “In Gloucester, residents have leveraged funding for 80 units of affordable elderly housing in an old grammar school, replaced historic lead glass windows at the Cape Ann Museum, and restored Depression-era WPA murals at City Hall.”  Read more of the Boston Globe article here

Since April is National Poetry month it seems extra fitting to pause on the Charles Allan Winter mural–which by the way is notoriously difficult to photograph in that site. Nice job by photographer Pat Greenhouse / Boston Globe.

In 1931, he and his wife Alice Beach Winter, also a successful artist, came to live in Gloucester year round having spent summers since 1914 and building their Mt. Pleasant studio  in 1922.  Poetry was the third mural Winter completed in Gloucester.

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Gloucester Lobster Trap Tree Harvest: Field of buoys many steps to Cape Ann Art Haven auction

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Have a look at this beautiful field of buoys. And think about another goodwill step of this annual ritual

Cape Ann Art Haven adds a clear coat to each and every one of our kids’ buoys before the annual auction.

Don’t forget

TUNE IN to GMG podcast live tonight 7pm on Cape Ann TV and clear part of your Friday night for thebuoy auction.

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Where the Sidewalk Begins- Walk this way again Railroad Ave

Hi Joey,

A sidewalk returns to Railroad Avenue. Some call it place making or Smart Growth. I say sometimes it’s nice to turn back time. Look at the old postcard image. We are lucky to have some of the same wide streets. Clean sidewalks – they’re great for residents. Great for commuters. Easier for families. Thank you DPW! It looks beautiful. I hope it inspires Shaws to match it up on the other side.

Bonus: It’s easier than ever to #strideby the Jeff Weaver mural at Ben’s Wallpaper and Paint and have a closer look. That mural changes now and again.

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New public art: LOOK UP downtown! Ken Riaf’s Pleasant & Main ARTISPHERE sign, last chance to see group show at Trident, wall mural on Parsons HarborWalk

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Hi Joey,

Look up downtown if you haven’t yet seen the wonderful Pleasant & Main ARTISPHERE sign designed and project-boosted by artist and dealer, Ken Riaf. Then head on into his Jeffrey Marshall exhibit Law & Water Gallery.

I bet you’ve seen that Ed Touchette painting catching your eye through Trident’s window—last days to see the group exhibit at Trident Gallery. Just one week away from Ed Touchette’s solo exhibit at Trident. East Gloucester and Veterans School parents please get ready to bring your kids to see his exhibit. East Gloucester kids can find an Mr. Touchette throwback tucked away on East Main. Here’s a snapshot – try and find it.

Pass through Parsons down to Rogers or up to Main to see the progress of the artists of Art Haven/Hive. Their wall mural along a private building of Parsons Street is coming along and their depiction of Man at the Wheel is filling in…check it out! We have cleaned and scrubbed out graffiti on many walls, more than once, and are happy to see new public art added alongside the temporary FISH NET street mural and Dress Code’s.

I’m not sure what artist, Bob Stephenson, would have thought of the latest mural, but I wish he could have seen it. I do know he liked the Calderwood Fish Net mural and was grateful to have the graffiti painted out, the lights installed and anytime we swept and weeded.

Special thanks this week to the folks with Dan Leaman Landscaping and Maintenance Corp for extra clean up and weeding along Parsons Street.

At first sight #proud of my Dad: HarborWalk Fisherman’s Wharf public art exhibition

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At first sight, Leo Vitale finds the panel where his Dad’s boat is featured in a gorgeous Paul Frontiero photograph. His cousin and sisters join in.

Joey Ciaramitaro, Vito Giacalone, Mark McDonough, and Peter Prybot were the original authors of this outdoor display, before it was expanded and updated.  The exhibit was restored because the original faded.  Artists generously granted reproduction permission of their work. Go see their art! Look for Joey Ciaramitaro, Paul Frontiero, Martin Luster and Brenda Guiled. Individuals and organizations were generous too. More on this later…

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Look and look again: The HarborWalk Fishermen’s Wharf exhibit is deeply channeled, joining discussion with fine art, business and community, wharf and sea.

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Keep in mind that the installation is a work-in-progress. Look for updates and notices of an official unveiling!

Look and look again: The spiffed up HarborWalk Fishermen’s Wharf exhibit is deeply channeled–joining fine art and discussion, business and community, wharf and sea. Keep in mind that the installation is a work-in-progress. Look for updates and notices of an official unveiling!

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Back in 2010, detailed information panels along Fishermen’s Wharf were created by Mark McDonough, Vito Giacalone, Peter Prybot and Joey Ciaramitaro. The panels were installed along the Giacalone’s wall, between businesses and at the water’s edge. The content, collaborative spirit and contemporary reporting impacted the HarborWalk design. Cambridge Seven Associates, architects for the HarborWalk, were fans. Connections were encouraged. Two HarborWalk story posts (formerly described as Story Moments) were sited at each end: Fishing Today HarborWalk Story Post #5 and Lobstering HarborWalk Story Post #4. Pretty much everybody hoped the signs would be cared for and this outdoor channel would remain.

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Thanks to bright sunshine, the panels along Fishermen’s Wharf deteriorated. Some of the fabulous content disappeared. Guess what? Signs are temporary and can be re-visited.

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New signs were designed, content edited and updated, and the display taken to a new level with support of the City. Matt Coogan, Senior Planner Community Development, directed the project, working with the original authors and team. Cambridge Seven Associates designed the panels. The addition of fine art photography, drawings and design spiffed up the already museum quality display. Fine art by Joey Ciaramitaro, Marty Luster, Paul Frontiero and others are something else to celebrate this week!

Saunter by. More stories to come. Worth repeating: the exhibit is still a work in progress. It’s not 100% live…yet!

contact Friends of the HarborWalk (most active related to the beautiful public gardens) kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com and/or gharborwalk@gmail.com

September 20 BLOCK PARTY HarborWalk – Trails and Sails – Harbortown – Committee for the Arts

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Thanks to Ringo, MBT Electricians, Parsons Street was ready and lit as darkness fell.

Downtown Block Party overlapped with the first weekend of Essex National Heritage annual Trails and Sails (Sept 19-21 and 26-28). James Owen Calderwood, the artist who created FISH NET, was here to experience both events, help set up and answer questions.

There were hours of great LIVE and local music by the stage in front of Bank Gloucester. I’ll add the entertainer names and sponsors for that stage into the comments below. Parents dining al fresco at Ohana watched their kids engage at the YMCA kid town area. 4Square dominates, effectively trapping all kids. The YMCA staff is excellent!

We enjoyed working with Don and Francis of FABOLA and the guys from Surfside Subs. Throughout the Block Party, happy customers lined up for Surfside Subs pizza (the biggest slices ever!) and it was non-stop at Markouk’s booth with City Hall rising beyond. (The next morning, Markouk would be up and at it again for Appleton Farms.) 

FABOLA enlivened the sidewalk and parking space with mid-century modern “parklet” seating areas. A cozy chair and ottoman upholstered with a touch of Provence did not sell, but a trio of friends paused on FISH NET with their new modern lamp purchase.

I didn’t get to Smokin Jim’s Barbecue in the back garden by Dog Bar, nor Cape Ann Community Cinema to see Charade with Cary Grant, or the cheese tasting, or…well, there’s no way to get it all in. I did see the King, Fred Bodin! Congratulations to Judith Brackley, Valerie Markley, Lucinda, and others for their professionalism and attention to detail for these top notch street festivals.

CREATIVE AWARENESS: PUBLIC ART INSTALLATIONS ON UTILITARIAN SURFACES New York Water Towers- Vancouver Silos- Gloucester Streets

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SELECTION OF TEMPORARY PUBLIC ART ON EXHIBIT NOW

See just a few of many artist’s ideas through temporary public art installations on utilitarian surfaces. Different purpose, message and style.

Os Gemeos, artists and brothers, monumental silos in Vancouver.

The Water Tank Project in New York City; overtime 100 will be wrapped.

Justin Desilva’s crosswalks and James Owen Calderwood’s FISH NET in Gloucester.

UPDATE: James Owen Calderwood

James Owen Calderwood’s FISH NET was recognized as an example of one of MA extraordinary public spaces. This summer Calderwood has re-painted and expanded the mural, completing his award. Professional photographer Linimberg Oliveira of Medford was in downtown Gloucester August for a photo shoot on Parsons Street. He described being inspired by Gloucester: the heady mix of historic buildings and architecture juxtaposed with modern art, specifically James Calderwood’s public street mural, FISH NET. You can see more of Calderwood’s work on view at the group show Sting! 18 Landscapes: Between Tradition & Imagination, at the Beehive in Boston. Calderwood works with lines in a variety of media. His welded aluminum sculpture Star was selected for the 2014 SculptureNow. The historic estate of Edith Wharton, the Mount, in Lenox, MA, is the current site for SculptureNow exhibition of large outdoor sculpture, which continues through October 31, 2014. REMINDER: The sculpture exhibit is a quick 5 minute drive to the Berkshire Museum’s Butterfly exhibit featuring work by Gloucester’s multi-talented artist, Kim Smith. 

UPDATE: Justin Desilva

Justin lives and works North of Boston. People have asked: Yes. Portuguese background. (Desilva’s grandfather emigrated from the Azores. He immigrated to the US, eventually working for a plastic injection mold company. An Uncle was a fisherman). His creative crosswalks make vivid connections based on Gloucester and stories from the HarborWalk. This installation is temporary and in progress. One of the next crosswalks will be on Harbor Loop and another on the east end of Main Street. He’ll reverse the crosswalks when the installation closes.  For a walking tour of the crosswalks Click for Google map for Justin Desilva crosswalk locations . Justin’s art is inspired by Jane Jacobs and her book the Death and Life of Great American Cities: “I was moved by her attention to detail of human interaction, and the idea that neighborhoods and cities are safest when they’re walkable.”

Justin Desilva’s art installation, With Every Street there’s a Story, is the second of three new works of art commissioned by the Committee for the Arts on behalf of the City of Gloucester for the 2013 HarborWalk Public Art Challenge, with funding from the Seaport Advisory Council. Calderwood’s was the first.

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Here in Gloucester, both installations are on view during the not-to-miss 2014 Essex National Heritage Trails and Sails weekends (Sept 19-21 and 26-28), which overlap with the September 20 Gloucester Block Party Saturday. MEET THE ARTISTS: they’ll be in town September 20th for these events.  Stop by the block party for special coloring page activity sheets!trails

Public art: Justin Desilva bookmark and seagull question

Hi Joey,

Artist Justin Desilva has completed several more crosswalks: Our Lady of Good Voyage, Lobsters, Howard Blackburn, and St. Peter’s Square.    He’s had several requests for a postcard or some take away about his temporary project. If you see him, ask for a bookmark. Some of the murals are at different stages in their installation process; you will see him going back and forth to different sites. As this project is temporary, Justin will remove his work at the conclusion of his exhibit.

There is a Google map http://goo.gl/maps/mc696 with updated locations and photographs.

Gloucester Counts Down to Kindergarten streamed across the Sawyer crosswalk. Congratulations GPS, Sawyer Free, CAM, Art Haven and YMCA in partnership with the Boston Children’s Museum for planning what looked like a stellar, joyous event.

Question: Does anyone know how to persuade the seagulls to forego their perch atop the light above the crosswalk by City Hall and Sawyer?!

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