Tag Archives: poetry

Sawyer Free at a crossroads: building plan meetings tomorrow January 11 at 4:00pm and 6:30pm

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Sawyer Free Building Committee is meeting at 4pm January 11, 2017 to discuss schematic design, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC grant opportunities), and ready another presentation. At 6:30pm they’ll give a second public presentation with the building team. (Today’s Gloucester Daily Times article by Ray Lamont has more information: Commish Questions: Library board presenting proposal at community forum Wednesday night) Below are photographs from the January 4th meeting for coporators and other invited guests. The library’s building committee and the new building team gave a presentation and fielded comments and questions. Attendees expressed both support and dismay. Like the schools, it’s a big topic.  There are similarities: seeking a matching state grant, steep building compliance requirements, same project manager as West Parish and architects as West Parish. Questions and concerns can be directed to a communications consultant engaged by the library who will help to connect you with answers. There was a scrumptious catering spread from Willow Rest. I liked the artisan flatbread school of fish display. Melissa and the Willow Rest team are so creative.

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The current North Shore Magazine gives a shout out to Beverly Library for being rather library-ish, “unlike a lot of libraries, it’s quiet.” Plus more interior photographs of the Boston Public Library.

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Boston Public Library passing through Daniel Chester French doors

 

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Longfellow among the 30 Boston notable mosaics

 

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Louis Saint-Gaudens twin lions, honoring Civil War veterans; grand stairs, ceiling, windows, partial peek at Puves de Chavennes murals

Balancing and balance

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Prior post: Proposed building plans. Plus universal access, consolidated archives and digitization

When good fences make good neighbors, and Robert Frost was here thanks to Walker Hancock

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Photo without irony. For irony scroll down to see the poem, Mending Wall, by Robert Frost, and for Hancock’s portrait of Frost.

Update: shortly after posting and thanks to Good Morning Gloucester facebook feed and readers, there may be more information coming on the outside-r artist who built such a great fence design. Please send in more information soon. And here is some! Danny Diamond writes: “I painted this octopus (and the rest of the fence) back in October. It belongs to  Jon Just Jon and Lisa Bouchie. The octopus was painted entirely with low-pressure spray-cans.” And Lisa Redbird adds:  “…conceived by Lisa Bouchie, built by Mark (Girard) of Spotless Monkey and spray painted by Danny Diamond. A true artist collaborative…”

Mending Wall

1914 poem by Robert Frost, American poet  (1874-1963), first published in anthology North of Boston

Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun;
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To  please the yelping dogs. The gaps I made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
“Stay where you are until our backs are turned!”
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door-game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines,  I tell him.
He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.”
Spring is mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
Why do they make good neighbors? Isn’t it
Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That wants it down.”  I could say “Elves” to him,
But it’s not elves exactly, and I’d rather
He said it for himself. I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go beyond his father’s saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, “Good fences make good neighbours.”

Robert Frost sat for Walker Hancock, Gloucester resident, esteemed sculptor and one of the country’s Monuments Men. Frost walked our local woods.

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Artist: Walker Kirtland Hancock, (b.1901-December 30, 1998)
Sitter: Robert Lee Frost, 26 Mar 1874 – 29 Jan 1963
Date: 1969 bronze sculpture cast after 1950 original (collection Amherst)
Dimensions: Without socle or mount: 16 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 10 inches
Collection: National Portrait Gallery

The Robert Frost Farm, Derry, NH (home 1900-1911)

Friends of Robert Frost, So. Shaftsbury, VT

Frost Place in Franconia, NH

Robert Frost Society established in 1978

Robert Frost collection at Amherst College (on the faculty for 40 years; also University of Michigan, Middlebury, Columbia, Harvard, and Yale, among other places) Hancock’s sculpture is in this collection. Sculpture of Frost by artist Penelope Jencks was unveiled in 2007

Robert Frost collection at Dartmouth College (alumnus)

A Frost Bouquet: Robert Frost, His Family, and the Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature, a digitized rendering of the 1996 exhibition at University of Virginia

Victor E. Reichert Robert Frost Collection, University at Buffalo

Audio of Frost reading poems, Part III includes Mending Wall or here read and listen to Frost’s voice as he recites Mending Wall:

First Night Boston Copley Square: top crowd at Man At Wheel ice sculpture…by far! And Boston Public Library

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There were also large ice works of a lighthouse, clipper ship and sea serpent (live sculpting work in progress while we were there)

Across the street a favorite spot with more public art and large crowds– the ever stunning Boston Public Library. An art post for another day: for now some interior details. Here are a Kitson marble bust of Longfellow and a tease detail from the Sargent murals. (My sons said they like the Sawyer Free teen room more but this Boston Library was something to be proud of, too.)

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Motif Monday: The quotable Christmas Mrs. Miniver

Inspired by Joey’s and Kim Smith’s countdowns and Greg Bover’s posts, I was thinking about a GMG countdown of favorite quotable Christmas and holiday excerpts, with an extra bonus for passages with Gloucester ties. Please add or send quotes, passages, and poems that we can delight in and share.

I’ll start with a description of jubilant awakening — children bursting through doors early Christmas morning — from a 1939 book by Jan Struther, Mrs. Miniver, which for me is also a sweet reminder about my folks as they followed a similar “stocking first-presents after” routine and were beloved.

A little background: Struther’s book stemmed from her popular fiction column begun in 1937 and published every two weeks in The Times. Following the book’s smash reception, the classic William Wyler movie, Mrs. Miniver, starring Greer Garson was released in 1942. The movie is based on the book but its own story. The movie was nominated for 12 Oscars and garnered 6 including best picture. The music is by Herbert Stothart who won an Oscar for his work on the Wizard of Oz.

Mrs. Miniver on embracing positive enthusiasm:

“It began in the same way every year: the handle of her bedroom door being turned just loudly enough to wake her up, but softly enough not to count as waking her up on purpose; (her child) Toby glimmering like a moth in the dark doorway, clutching a nobbly Christmas stocking in one hand and holding up his pyjama trousers with the other. (He insisted upon pyjamas, but he had not yet outgrown his sleeping-suit figure.)

‘Toby! It’s only just after six. I did say not till seven.’ ‘But, Mummy, I can’t tell the time.’ He was barefoot and shivering, and his eyes were like stars.

Read more

Wonderful Gloucester Cultural Council has money for 2017 arts, humanities and sciences projects. Apply now!

The GCC Application deadline is October 17, 2016. No paper copies are required this year!

The GCC grants have primed countless programs that would not have been possible without that support. The unheralded community volunteers that put in the time and effort to administer the process are fantastic. I look forward to seeing the annual choices. Good luck everyone!

Rose Sheehan writes to GMG:

On behalf of the Gloucester Cultural Council please help us get the word out about project funding opportunities. Thanks! 

The Gloucester Cultural Council is currently accepting applications for grant funding for community-based projects in the arts, humanities and sciences for the FY 2017 round of funding. Each year, organizations, schools and individuals are invited to apply to the Local Cultural Council for funding to support projects that promote rich cultural experiences in the Gloucester community. This year, all applicants must submit their proposals via the new online system and no hard copy applications will be accepted. 

The Gloucester Cultural Council is part of a network of 329 Local Cultural Councils serving all 351 cities and towns in the Commonwealth. The LCC Program is the largest grassroots cultural funding network in the nation, supporting thousands of community-based projects in the arts, sciences and humanities every year. The state legislature provides an annual appropriation to the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency, which then allocates funds to each community. The Gloucester Cultural Council guidelines, project priorities and online applications are available at http://www.mass-culture.org/Gloucester.

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Gloucester Daily Times April 2012, Poetry Comes Alive, East Gloucester Elementary school celebrates National Poetry Month with support from the Gloucester Cultural Council, an MCC LCC initiative

Calling All Poets! Open Mic in Rockport

A tradition of the Motif No.1 Day arts festival is to feature poets from Cape Ann and their work in a poetry reading, which takes place each year at 4pm.

This year the event is hosted by Christopher Anderson of the Eastern Point Lit House, and will take place in an open mic format. Poets and readers of all ages welcome. Come early for the other literary events at the festival (the Magnetic Poetry Slam, Book Spine Poetry, selections from Shakespeare presented by Cape Ann Shakespeare Troupe, and more) and stay for the Words Before Dinner Poetry Reading.

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Click HERE for a general festival Schedule of Events.

Out in the street around the bend

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Have you seen the custom sign designed for the Gloucester Writers Center on East Main Street? I sent a picture of the drive by view to Henry Ferrini. He sent back “an interior shot of the sign with an effigy of Vincent working at his typewriter”  looking out their new-ish (2014) window thanks to another helpful grant of the Community Preservation Act.

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The sign was made by Cheryl’s Signs in Gloucester and installed last fall. Ferrini added: “William Taylor who is on the board of the Gloucester Writers Center should get all the kudos. He came up with the idea and executed it.” Look out the window and listen:  Henry plays a part in the captivating restoration of classical radio WCVA-FM www.wcva.com. Turn it on.

This week: poets Jay Featherstone reading with Carol Seitchik at the Gloucester Writers’ Center, Wed April 6, 7:30 pm.

 

Annual Day in April is Simple Yet Profound – Kids Clutching Poems…

Catherine Ryan submits ~

unnamedQueuing and sharing. Poem in Your Pocket Day fell on April 30. The power of poetry and listening was unforgettable. Try it yourself next year—bring extra Kleenex.

Mayor Romeo-Theken encourages Gloucester students to send their original poem to the Office of the Mayor, 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA. She promises to read them! Students should include their name, which Gloucester school, their grade and teacher’s name.

Look for Poem in Your Pocket Day each April. It’s free and simple to participate. Carry a Poem. Share a Poem. For more information, search for Poem in Your Pocket Day (PIYP Day) Academy of American Poets (www.poets.org) or New York City’s excellent web site, http://www.NYC.gov/poem. PIYP Day started in NYC in 2002 inspired by theFavorite Poem Project established in 1997 by Robert Pinsky, former Poet Laureate of the United States. East Gloucester Elementary initiated PIYP Day in 2012 because it always celebrates literacy and arts. Students are encouraged to submit poems to the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library’s Poetry without Paper contest.

The honorary post for the Gloucester Poet Laureate was created in 1998. There have been four poet laureates: Vincent Ferrini was the City’s first, then John Ronan, Ruthanne Collinson, and the current Poet Laureate, Peter Todd. The Committee for the Arts helps select a new Poet Laureate every four years.

Special thanks to the students; Mayor Romeo-Theken; East Gloucester Elementary school teachers and staff– especially Literacy Coach Melissa Francis; EGS PTO; poet laureate, Peter Todd, and former laureates John Ronan and Rufus Collinson. Student Cal White read Peter Todd’s poem, Friendship, for morning message. Visit Gloucester’s website for more information and to read the poems shared by the poet laureates.

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Submit Your Short Film or Poem for Rockport’s Upcoming Festival!

 

The Red Shed Film FestSUBMIT YOUR FILM FOR THE RED SHED FILM FEST ON ROCKPORT’S MOTIF No.1 DAY Are you a filmmaker? Apply to screen your film at the Red Shed Film Festival on Motif No.1 Day in Rockport! The Red Shed is a micro film festival featuring selected shorts produced on Cape Ann or with Cape Ann as the subject. The history, geography, art, people, city and towns of Cape Ann are all suitable for treatment — anything that conveys the region’s sense of place. The Red Shed Film Festival takes place on Saturday, May 17, 2014 as part of Rockport’s annual Motif No.1 Day festival of the arts. The Guidelines for Entries: Films must come in under 15 minutes and should be produced on, or be about, Cape Ann. Film structure and genre can be fiction or non-fiction, abstract or literal, linear or non-linear – play with your aesthetic tastes.Application does not guarantee screening. As such, a winner in this festival is anyone whose film is chosen to be screened. If your piece is chosen to be screened, you will be contacted based on the information you provide in the application (email or phone probably). Please submit your film at: www.rockportartfestivals.com/motif-1-festival-events/film-festival. For more information please contact granitevisions@gmail.com 978.290.9200 or go to http://www.rockportartfestivals.com

SUBMIT YOUR WORK FOR THE “WORDS BEFORE DINNER LITERARY EVENT” ON ROCKPORT’S MOTIF No.1 DAY! Have you written a poem or essay with Cape Ann as its theme? If so, we’d love to have your submission for the annual Words Before Dinner Literary event, taking place at 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 17th in downtown Rockport as part of the town’s Motif No. 1 Day festival. Readers will share selections of their own work from poems to brief essays (under 750 words) featuring the beauty, history, industry art and landscape of Cape Ann as inspiration. Please submit your work for consideration to rockportfestivals@gmail.com and plan to join other members of Cape Ann’s literary community for a few Words Before Dinner on May 17th. For more information go to www.rockportartfestivals.com or call 978-546-2861

The GloucesterCast Podcast Episode 9

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https://goodmorninggloucester.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/051911gloucestercast.mp3

Click here to play or save the podcast

In this episode- Patty Knaggs on WBUR, Abby Ytzen/Captain Joe and Sons seARTS Partner With An Artist Exhibit May 21st, Kenny’s Strange Footwear, community garden at Burnham field, tomato release day is coming up at Goose Cove, Gloucester reads poetry and Sawyer Free Library, Khan Studio/ Good Morning Gloucester Gallery on Rocky Neck, Kenny’s Real Estate Segment

Patty Knaggs on WBUR http://radioboston.wbur.org/2011/05/11/home-selling-market

Abby Ytzen/Captain Joe and Sons seARTS Partner With An Artist Exhibit May 21st

Kenny’s Strange Footwear, community garden at Burnham field,

tomato release day is coming up at Goose Cove may 25 http://www.goosecovegardens.com/

Gloucester reads poetry and Sawyer Free Library- Joey’s Poem Here

Khan Studio/ Good Morning Gloucester Gallery on Rocky Neck

, Kenny’s Real Estate Segment

Please leave comments or questions on which topics you would like to hear more about on The GloucesterCast or how we could improve. Thanks for listening.

Check Out Kenny’s Blog- TheCutBridge.com

The GloucesterCast Theme Song Gloucester Til The End Music is from Earl and Arch- you can download it for free at GimmeSound here-http://www.gimmesound.com/EarlAndArch-1/

Subscribe to the podcast here

Once at iTunes if you feel like rating the podcast that would help it get recognized in the iTunes searches.

Good Morning Gloucester- The Poem

Last night an interesting swath of diverse Gloucester folk were invited to recite their favorite poem at the Sawyer Free Library.  I happened to be one of those people invited to read.  Instead of reading someone else’s poem I decided it would be a good idea to work on my own after our good FOB Deb Clarke suggested the idea.  With a little help from Snoop Maddie Mad and The Bean we put together a little something.

I’m not sure why I get so goddamn emotional when I speak about G-Town.  Not sure if you can tell from the video but I was pretty much a wreck.  It probably had something to do with not wanting to do a disservice to the city I love or the blog for which I’m obviously insanely passionate about but I sort of get overwhelmed at times when I speak about them.

Anyway I’d like to thank the Sawyer Free Library Lyceum and host Rufus Collinson for inviting me.  I’d like to thank my great poetry contributors Snoop Maddie Mad and The Bean, and I’d like to thank everyone who came out for the event including our very own E.J.

Written and Read For The Sawyer Free Library Lyceum Sponsored Program- Gloucester Reads Poetry

Look for many of the other invited readers’ videos as the week goes on, I know the camera ran out of memory about half way through so I didn’t get to capture everyone unfortunately.

GOOD MORNING GLOUCESTER

Good Morning Gloucester, Open Your Eyes
What Do You See?

Gloucester At Dawn, Fishing Boats Heading To Sea
Working Boats- Lobster Boats- Gillnetters, Draggers and Seiners

Marine Industrial Flowers- Rocky Neck Flowerboxes- Thorny Rosa Rugosa, Fragrant and Colorful Along The Rocky Back Shore

The Sound Of The Dory Oars Clacking Away As The International Dory Boat Racers Practice Before Work

Beautiful Industry Comes Alive- The Fishhouses Hum- The Trucks Bring Our Seafood Harvest To Market

The Herring Boats Pump- The Gulls Fight For The Scraps

As Morning Comes The Community Gathers To Fuel Up At The Lone Gull, The Pleasant St Tea Company and Cape Ann Coffee- “Hey Joe, How Ya Been?”

Planners Start Planning- Doers Start Doing- Road Races – Block Parties- The Fiesta- The Horribles Parade- The Schooner Festival- The Lanesville Parade- Art Haven- Art Coloniy- seART- Nights On The Neck- The Sidewalk Bazaar- The Farmers Market- The Fish Box Derby -The Middle Street Walk- Celebrate Gloucester- Harbor Loop Concerts – The Lobster Trap Tree- A Sheer Embarrassment Of Cultural Events That Bedroom Communities Can Only Envy

Writing Gloucester- Painting Gloucester- Singing Gloucester-Eating Gloucester- Breathing Gloucester

All That Doing’s Got Me Hungry Joe

No Worries- We Can Always Pop Into Virgilio’s for A Nice St Joseph’s Sandwich, or What The Hell A Slice O’ Pizza At 9AM at Sclafaini’s

Let’s Take A Ride Shall We?  A Quickie – Spin The Beach By The Footbridge First and Then Head Round East Gloucester (God’s Country, Don’t You Know?) First The Back Shore, Farrington Ave Past Niles Beach Down East Main and Back To The Dock

Offload Those Lobster Boats Joe- Get ‘Em In Get ‘Em Out and Get Paid, Ain’t That The Way?

Well Works All Done Kid, Dusk Is Settin’ In.

Time To Head Home To The Bean and Snoop Maddie Mad

A Quick Ride Down Main St To Check On My Peeps and Give A Wave- “What Up Homie?”

Down Past The Man at The Wheel and Look Out To Dogbar-

Sun’s Settin’ Joe

Good Evening Gloucester

Here is a picture courtesty Sawyer Free Library of the readers for the event-

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