Tag Archives: Perfect Storm

F/V Misty Blue coverage shares Perfect Storm experience and New Bedford Tribute memorial

Boston Herald Perfect Storm family experience and advice alongside coverage about the 2 missing men Michael Roberts, 44, and Jonathan Saraiva, 32, both of New Bedford, and 2 crew rescued from the sinking of the F/V Misty Blue. South Coast Today  and the Boston Globe

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Boston Herald ©Nancy Lane photograph of the New Bedford FISHERMENS TRIBUTE MONUMENT. The monument is by New Bedford artist, Erik Durant, dedicated in 2016, people have started to leave flowers in tribute this week

Boston Herald photograph with Brian Dowling story fishermens tribute monument ©NANCY LANE 120617fishnl01.jpg

#GloucesterMA in Boston Globe & Cape Ann Beacon- Good Harbor Beach Salt Island for sale, again

July 2016 Salt Island Good Harbor Beach

Salt Island, Good Harbor Beach and Brier Neck are naturally connected. The five acre Salt Island is about 1000 feet from Good Harbor Beach in Gloucester, Massachusetts. A sandbar links the island and beach at low tide. I’ve culled a few milestones in its history. Scroll down to 2017 to find the links for the Cape Ann Beacon and today’s Boston Globe.

SALT ISLAND TIMELINE BITS

1860

History of the Town of Gloucester: Cape Ann, John Jame Babson’s published history includes a shipwreck of the vessel, Industry, at Little Good Harbor Beach near Salt Island in 1796

19th century

Joseph Parsons’ family operated a lobster business from Salt Island

pre 1919

silent movies were filmed on location

1919 Fox Film Co Bride Number 13

Parts of the Fox Film Corporation movie, Bride Number 13, were shot on location at Good Harbor Beach and Salt Island. The 15 part serial silent film –“the most costly pictures ever made…would consume expenditures of at least one million dollars.” It was conceived and written by Edward Sedgwick, directed by Richard Stanton aka “Salt Island’s Mighty Emperor”, and starred Marguerite Clayton, Jack O’Brien, and Ed Rossman. The script was inspired by Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.

Here are a few fun excerpts from 1919 correspondence published in the book, “My father, a silent films pioneer,” by George E. Mcavoy:

“Again the picturesque Gloucester shores have been sought by a motion picture corporation for scenery and the noted Fox Film Company of New York, with its prominent director, Richard Stanton, has arrived at Hotel Harbor View, East Gloucester, to start immediately on the work of filming “Bride Number 13” at Salt Island off Brier Neck.

“It was decided that Salt Island in Gloucester, Mass., would be the setting of the silent film thriller, “Bride Number 13.” This island was an island at high tide and part of the mainland at low tide. Fox film Co. was building a wooden castle on the island, which was about one hundred feet high and hosted the actions of this silent film…” 

“(This was five days before the real tornado blew the wooden castle out to sea.)”

Oct 24, 1919“Dear Mother: I left Mary and the babies in Gloucester. I am on my way through New Hampshire and Maine for a lumber camp location. I expect to be back in Gloucester Monday night…

the time for the blowing up of the castle on Salt Island and the rescue of the brides from the pirate band is rapidly approaching…

Billy Carr of Gloucester, Chief Gunner’s Mate on the Navy submarine R-1 that was assigned to the picture, was to play the hero who rescues one of the brides, slashes through the nest of cutthroats, leaps into the basket with her and off. It was now November 10th. A throng of 3,000 was at Good Harbor and all over Brier Neck to watch…On the fourth day Bill Carr was called away on duty and his place was taken by Tom Corbiey…”

“Mr. Sedgwick has achieved something heretofore unknown in moving picture production. He conceived the idea of the story, witnessed and helped direct the scenes, acted in them, had a hand in the grinding of the film, and in fact had a part in every process of the film production…”

“While all bid good-bye to Gloucester last night, there was a general expression of a desire to return and several of the company said that they intended to return here next summer for the vacation period if not in picture work.”

“The explosion was a heavy one and its shock was felt in all parts of the city. It shook the windows of houses on Mt. Vernon Street and vicinity, also at East Gloucester and as far as Rockport. It occurred at 4:20 o’clock and people who felt the shock readily attributed it to the blow-up of Salt Island.”

photo caption: Bride 13 star Marguerite Clayton and kids on vacation during filming of Bride 13. Background shows the stately castle film set on Salt Island

film set castle on salt island good harbor beach gloucester ma- Mary McAvoy with sons

1923 The Silent Command

Then and now: filmmakers love Gloucester.

Fox Film Corporation returned to film the patriotic silent era Navy spy film, THE SILENT COMMAND on Good Harbor Beach, again on the Briar/Brier neck side.

The Silent Commander filed on Good Harbor Beach Salt Island

1923 was a busy year for Gloucester, MA. In addition to the municipality managing the bustling tercentenary, Gloucester welcomed another major Fox movie production to shoot on location at Good Harbor Beach. The film was made in cooperation with the Navy. It was directed by J Gordon Edwards, and starred Edmund Lowe and Bela Lugosi in his first American film. It’s essentially a spy thriller with a honeypot formula: foreign power attempts to secure plans to the Panama Canal and blow it up. The villains are thwarted by the US Navy. The production required assistance from the city’s fire department and city electrician. The film crew stayed in Gloucester at the Harbor View Hotel and the Savoy. Local people were cast and spectators lined the beach to watch the thrilling production.

BEFORE CGI:

I love this excerpt from the Gloucester Daily Times describing the staged wreck and tremendous waves washing the crew (stuntmen and Gloucester locals) overboard:

“A crowd of several hundred thronged the (Good Harbor) beach for the picture taking and enjoyed the proceedings, which were interesting, and at times thrilling…The Good Harbor beach setting is a clever contrivance, and constructed to produce a natural rocking motion of a steamer in a heavy sea. The rocking is produced by four winches operated by a crew of 10 men…Storm scenes were filmed yesterday afternoon with local actors, Stuart Cooney, son of Marion J. Cooney, taking the part of the hero and making a thrilling climb into the rigging to the crow’s nest during the height of the storm. Fred Kolstee, a rigger, commanded the crew of the steamer. The crew were (locals) Alfred Marshall, Tony Amero, Tom Bess, Peter Rice, James Francis, James Whittle and William Byers. Rain was produced from lines of hose, and a most realistic effect was produced by two aeroplanes, the wind from the speeding propellors driving the water about, and rushing through the rattlings and rigging with all the vengeance of a real gale at sea. Three times the big tank of water was released and the thousands of gallons broke over the deck in a most thrilling manner. There was some concern among the movie men before the water was released that some of the men might get buffeted about and get hurt, and they were cautioned to hold on tight.

However, it was a mere trifle for Gloucestermen, veterans of many a gale on the banks.

It was best expressed by Alfred Marshall when he stepped toward the ladder to leave the craft after the picture taking was done. Alfred was quite vexed. “Blankety, blankety, blank___, is this the best you can do? Blank, I’ve bailed bigger seas than that out of a dory. And he sung it right out so all could hear, too.”

Stuart Cooney ensured that the movie was a success from a technical perspective and “purchased the outfit and (took) it over” after the filming finished. He was a Gloucester pioneer in the film industry that’s still going strong. Film Cape Ann facilitates bringing local productions here, like the award winning Manchester by the Sea.  The Wikipedia page doesn’t have any mention of Gloucester, but it helped me with an illustration for The Silent Command lobby poster.

1923 silent FOX movie The Silent Command filmed on location Good Harbor Beach Gloucester MA

See for yourself; here’s a link to the complete movie. A few of the Gloucester scenes (not all) 1:03:44, 1:08:54, 1:09:54 (some coast), 1:10:21,  1:10:52 (dory lowered from navy ship), 1:11:12 (beach island)

AFI for TCM brief synopsis: “This is one of those ‘Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean’ pictures. Full of the ‘Star-Spangled Banner,’ patriotic to the nth degree with the navy floating all over the screen. A real hero, a vamp, and a flock of thrills.” (from Var review.) Foreign agents, determined to destroy the United States Navy’s Atlantic Fleet and the Panama Canal, after an unsuccessful attempt to obtain from Capt. Richard Decatur information regarding mine positions in the Canal Zone, hire adventuress Peg Williams to vamp Captain Decatur, thereby putting him at their mercy. Decatur, advised by the Chief of Naval Intelligence, plays along with the spies to gain their confidence. He leaves his wife and is dismissed from the Navy as a result of his association with Miss Williams. Finally, he goes to Panama, thwarts the saboteurs, saves the fleet and the canal, and gains honorable reinstatement and the gratitude of his country for his heroism.”

1940s

Guy Parsons used one of the old family fishing shacks as a summer place

1950s

By now the fishing shacks were no longer visible

1952

Parson family sold Salt Island

1959

James Kimball purchased Salt Island for $2000

1972

Yankee Magazine article about Bride Number 13 Lights! Camera! Disaster! by Joseph E. Garland

1979

Gloucester Daily Times article mentions that James Kimball “has no plans for the island, although in the past he has thought of building a summer home on the island. When I was young my family spent their summers on Brier Neck…So when the island became available I jumped at the chance.”

2000

One of  the designated “Special places in Gloucester”

2005

“Special places in Gloucester” appendix list for the MA Heritage Landscape Inventory Program, MA Dept of Conservation and Recreation Essex National Heritage

September 7, 2011

GMG abou the Filming of Bride 13 on Salt Island by Fred Bodin

“Where is this film? I’d love to know. All sources indicate that Bride 13 was either lost or destroyed, as happened with many silent films. The reference used for this post was the May 1972 Yankee Magazine article, Lights! Camera! Disaster!, authored by the late Joseph E. Garland of Gloucester.”

and September 9, 2011 GMG Filming of Bride 13 on Salt Island Fred Buck Cape Ann Museum adds photos from the location filming 

2013

Salt Island listed for sale $300,000 plus beach parking passes for the family

2017

Salt Island listed For Sale $750,000

September 2017 Cape Ann Beacon

Sept 1 Cape Ann Beacon “Salt Island is for Sale” by Jason Brisbois

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2017 BOSTON GLOBE

Today’s paper: Sept 16 Boston Globe “A Gem or a Rock: For $750,000 Salt Island Could Be Yours” by Billy Baker

“If somebody buys it and builds, it’s because these guys didn’t step up to the plate and protect it the way my father did when I was a little girl, ” said Maslow, who pointed out that she and her siblings are not rich people with big summer houses. “I can’t help it if someone buys it and paints it purple and puts pigs on it.” – Karen Maslow

“…this island has been available for public use informally for generations thanks to the goodwill of that family. That point should not be lost.” — Chris LaPointe, Essex County Greenbelt

Boston Globe Sept 16 2017 Salt Island for sale

Trulia listing for Salt Island exclaims “Showings available only at low tide!”

 

Palm Beach article reflects on ‘Perfect Storm’ intensity and local fall out

“The surging tide destroyed no fewer than 1,200 feet of the wall — and, of course, washed away the “Cowboys” marker. It also washed a tow truck, two cars and a Florida Power & Light Co. truck into each other and injured two people.  Waves also wiped out 210 feet of the 940-foot Lake Worth municipal pier …”

Read more

Http//www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/post-time-wave-that-washed-out-cowboys-marker-part-perfect-storm/foUo7w7QBPUyKt6fGWoDMM/

TAG FROM THE “PERFECT STORM’S” HANNAH BODEN FOUND ON IRISH BEACH

Irish Examiner

March 21, 2017

By Patrick Flynn

A tag from a fishing boat that famously survived the Perfect Storm off the US coast in 1991, has washed up on a beach in Co Clare.

The tragedy, which resulted in the loss of the fishing vessel Andrea Gail and her crew, was later featured in a film starring George Clooney.

The last vessel to communicate with the Andrea Gail was her sister ship the Hannah Boden which at the time was skippered by Linda Greenlaw. Both boats had been fishing off Massachusetts when they encountered a raging storm which eventually sank the Andrea Gail.

The Hannah Boden remains in active service to this day and it was a tag from one of her lobster pots that was discovered on Fanore beach by beachcomber Liam McNamara last Tuesday.

Liam made contact with a crew member from the Hannah Boden who confirmed that the tag was from the vessel. The tag travelled over 5,000 kilometres across the Atlantic from the US coast but may have been lost overboard between 10 and 15 years ago. Liam said: “It is in fact a tag from the now very famous New England boat, the Hannah Boden, which survived “The Perfect Storm” of 1991 while her sister boat the Andrea Gail which was lost at sea with all hands. A stern man from Linda’s boat has confirmed the tag and license number with Linda herself and confirmed it as being from her boat. I posted it on my Beachcombing page and shared it on some of the USA lobster and commercial fishing sites in the hope of getting it positively identified,” he said.

In September 2015, a United States Coast Guard (USCG) life ring was found on the Clare coast thousands of kilometres where from it was lost overboard in Florida.The life ring, and attached strobe light unit and emergency beacon, were washed up near Byrnes Cove in Kilkee and spotted by the crew of the Shannon based search and rescue helicopter. The US Coast Guard later confirmed the equipment to be from a Response Boat Small Class 25ft from Coast Guard Station Port Canaveral in Florida. Port Canaveral is located 3,900 miles (6,276 kilometres) from Kilkee where the items were discovered.

Vote for The Andrea Gail Lego Set

This is a site where you can create your own Lego set, and if it reaches 10,000 votes the Lego review board will decide to make it a official set or not,

This week we’re highlighting models of ships. The staff pick of the day is: F/V Andrea Gail
http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/37260

VOTE HERE

I’d Buy one and I’m cheap.

created by mmbace on 2013.03.14

“The aren’t many LEGO sets that allow one to identify with an episode of modern history like this. The Andrea Gail would be a gem in any shipbuilder’s collection.”

“She’s comin’ on, boys, and she’s comin’ on strong.”

— Last radio transmission from Capt. Frank “Billy” Tyne of the Andrea Gail.

If you have seen the movie The Perfect Storm (or read the book on which it was based), then you should be well acquainted with the history of the Andrea Gail. If not, I’ll give you a little background:

The Andrea Gail was a longline fishing vessel built in 1979. She was homeported in Marblehead, Massachusetts, but usually sailed from Gloucester. On or around October 28, 1991, the Andrea Gail was caught in one of the worst storms to ever hit the North Atlantic, the so-called “Perfect Storm” of 1991. The Andrea Gail radioed her last position at around 6:00 PM on October 28, and then went silent.

Although the US and Canadian Coast Guards mounted a vigorous effort to rescue the crew of the Andrea Gail, searching almost 200,000 square nautical miles, the only items ever recovered were an EPIRB unit (a rescue beacon), several 55-gallon drums, and a few random pieces of flotsam.” CLICK HERE FOR MORE

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http://art-rocks.org/

Remembering the Perfect Storm Pictures From David Sullivan’s Sister Cathy and Gloucester Til the End

Earl and Arch Perform the Official Song Of GoodMorningGloucester- Gloucester Til The End Video from Mike Lindberg-

Terry Weber’s friend Cathy Sullivan Mustone of Gloucester would like to share photos of her brother David Sullivan, who was lost at sea in the "Perfect Storm" and a few pics from the movie experience. It’s been twenty years! Ironically, we are due to have a Nor’easter this weekend. Thank you to Cathy for sharing.

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Perhaps the GMG readers would like to send in some photos of what they experienced during the Halloween-Unnamed-Perfect Storm twenty years ago or share some memories.

Marooned on – Eastern Point Island

Eastern Point Light, Perfect Storm, 1991 ©George B. Lenart
On October 31st, 1991, diesel mechanic and photo enthusiast George B. Lenart was caught in a historic storm on Cape Ann’s granite coast. He drove his big Mogul Motors truck out to the end of Eastern Point for a job with the Eastern Point Yacht Club. What George walked into was a hurricane strength tempest with sustained winds of 75 miles per hour and gusts up to 98 miles per hour (hurricane devastation occurs at 73+ mph). Unexpectedly, George Lenart was marooned by rising water and monstrous waves. He grabbed his camera  and captured this incredible scene from the 3rd floor of the Eastern Point Yacht Club. It shows Eastern Point Light and Dog Bar Breakwater, which guard the entrance to Gloucester Harbor. Waves built to 70 feet, one of which swept right through Mother Ann Cottage, seen on the left, and completely destroyed a house high atop Sherman Point by Good Harbor Beach. George’s only option was to camp out overnight at the yacht club.
I didn’t photograph the Halloween Storm. I was busy helping a Bearskin Neck artist move his paintings to safety, aided a neighbor on Rocky Neck save what she could after storm surge took most of her personal belongings out to sea, and salvaged the 150 framed photos that were damaged in my gallery on Tuna Wharf. The phrase perfect storm has become part of the English language, being synonymous with “worst-case scenario.”
Photographed on 35mm color negative film by George B. Lenart. Scanned and printed digitally. Image #GBL-001c
And yes, we do sell this photograph in the gallery. Thank you George.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

 

The Weather Channel Will Be Here On Friday

I’ve been speaking with the field producer from The Weather Channel.  They will be coming to town on Friday to do a bunch of segments to promote their upcoming Friday night movie series which they will be kicking off with The Perfect Storm.

Jim Cantore will be in the hizzy and I guess we will be taping on the hour segments from 6am to 10am.

Jim Cantore

For the Gloucester Daily Times Perfect Storm Page click this text

Weathervane Cape Pond Ice Gear

The Weathervane carries a full line of Cape Pond Ice Gear including shirts, hats, sweatshirts, Perfect Storm Cape Pond Ice gear.  Its amazing how much stuff they have in stock, ready to purchase for yourself or someone that wants a gift with a local flavor theme.

Weathervane Cape Pond Ice Gear, originally uploaded by captjoe06.