Tag Archives: Monet

Motif Monday: Memorial Day, Gordon Parks, Poppies

 

Five reds five  whites five blues

Donald Sultan Five Reds, Five Whites, Five Blues, 2008 color silkscreen with enamel, flocking and tar like texture

Respectfully thinking about art that helps us celebrate, remember, remind and reflect every family who has suffered a loss in service.

 

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Gordon Parks, Library of Congress, 1943 photograph, Gloucester policemen, Memorial Day Ceremonies

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John McCrae, 18721918

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place, and in the sky,

The larks, still bravely singing, fly,

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the dead; short days ago

We lived, felt  dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

in Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe!

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high!

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields. 

Veteran of the Boer War and WWI, a teacher, and doctor, Canadian John McCrae wrote In Flanders Fields in the spring of 1915 while still at the bloody battlefront in Ypres, Belgium, in an area known as Flanders. The Germans had already used deadly gas. Dr. McCrae had been tending to hundreds of wounded daily. He described the nightmare slaughter: “behind it all was the constant background of the sights of the dead, the wounded, the maimed.” By this time he had already devoted his life to art and healing. He couldn’t save his friends. How could anyone?  Twenty years prior, he sketched poppies during his medical residency in Maryland. He published poems and stories by the time he was 16.  I’m not surprised he noticed the brilliant fragile petals and horror. He wrote for those who couldn’t speak and those who had to see. Meningitis and pneumonia killed him January 1918 after several months battling asthma and bronchitis. His poem and the emblematic poppy continue to inspire and comfort.

A few poppy images follow. I was thinking about their poetic illumination before and after WW1 and layers of meaning and beauty.

John McCrae sketch book 1896, Maryland

John McCrea sketchbook, ca.1896, Maryland

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Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane? Wall Street Journal focus on Fitz Henry Lane

Cat Ryan Submits-

Hi Joey

Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane?

Check out John Wilmerding’s review of Fitz Henry Lane’s half-dozen foggy views such as Ship Starlight in the Fog (c.1860) which is in the collection of the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, OH.

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http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694?mod=wsj_streaming_stream&mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694.html%3Fmod%3Dwsj_streaming_stream&fpid=2,7,121,122,201,401,641,1009

For more hazy light and atmosphere, rivers and tides, and artists born in MA: the WSJ  has covered the James Abbott McNeill Whistler biography by Sutherland

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and current Whistler exhibitions which you can check out if you hustle. An American in London: Whistler and the Thames at Addison Gallery of American Art is closing April 13, 2014. Go!

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No deadlines:

Make time to visit Ipswich and seek out work by Arthur Wesley Dow.

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And when it re-opens, Cape Ann Museum for all things Lane.

Haystacks

Haystacks are common wherever hay is grown. The purpose is to to let the hay dry in open air, and not become moist and rot. These haystacks were photographed by Gloucester's Charles E. Dennison. I think he was inspired by Monet's famous Haystacks series of oil paintings. From what I know of Dennison, the photo was taken in the North Shore area. He was also a painter.   By chance, I was browsing Main Street Arts and Antiques on Main Street. There on the wall was a painting of haystacks by Charles E. Dennison! It was based on this photo. I bought it for a few million dollars less than a Monet. There are still haystacks along Route 133 between Essex and Ipswich. Get some shots while you can.

Haystacks are common wherever hay is grown. The purpose is to to let the hay dry in open air, and not become moist and rot. These haystacks were photographed by Gloucester’s Charles E. Dennison. I think he was inspired by Monet’s famous Haystacks series of oil paintings. From what I know of Dennison, the photo was taken in the North Shore area. He was also a painter. By chance, I was browsing Main Street Arts and Antiques on Main Street. There on the wall was a painting of haystacks by Charles E. Dennison! It was based on this photo. I bought it for a few million dollars less than a Monet. There are still haystacks along Route 133 between Essex and Ipswich. Get some shots while you can.