Tag Archives: MIT

7th grader MIT fan wins 3M competition

Gitanjali Rao, 11 year old from Colorado and huge fan of MIT, was inspired to invent a better way to test water for lead. Her idea won the 2017 3M America’s Top Young Scientist competition. Here’s an excerpt from  Laura Wamsley story on NPR: “I went, ‘Well, this is not a reliable process and I’ve got to do something to change this,’ ” the seventh-grader told Business Insider. Rao tells ABC that while she was doing her weekly perusal of MIT’s Materials Science and Engineering website to see “if there’s anything new,” she read about new technologies that could detect hazardous substances and decided to see whether they could be adapted to test for lead.

Link to more 3M finalists

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Laura Harrington’s new novel A Catalog of Birds to be released in 2 days |Gloucester book launches at The Bookstore and goodlinens

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Laura Harrington’s New Novel, A Catalog of Birds, will be released on July 11 by Europa Editions.  Two back to back special book launches in Gloucester:

book launch Thursday July 13th @ 7PM The Bookstore of Gloucester – 61 Main Street

“Harrington’s ‘Alice Bliss’ was a big hit, and you won’t want to miss out on this one either!”

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book launch Friday July 14th @ 7PM  at goodlinens / studio 133 Main Street UPDATE goodlinens RSVP at capacity

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Laura Harrington Book Tour Dates for A Catalog of Birds

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Laura Harrington is an award-winning playwright, lyricist, librettist and author.  She teaches at MIT and lives in Gloucester, MA.  And she sings! Alice Bliss, her first novel, grew out of Harrington’s one-woman musical Alice Unwrapped, which ran off-Broadway in New York and in the Minneapolis Fringe Festival in 2009. Her novel Alice Bliss (Viking/Penguin) won the 2012 Massachusetts Book Award in Fiction.  Playwrights Horizons has commissioned her to create Alice Bliss the musical which is in production 2017. 

Read the great press release issued by MIT

Semiconductor legend: you couldn’t make a chip without ion implantation| RIP Peter H Rose (1925-2017)

Rockport resident, Rose was a notable North Shore physicist and entrepreneur who founded seminal global manufacturing companies in Gloucester (Extrion Corp. 1971/ then Varian/now Applied) and Beverly (Nova Assoc, 1978)/now Axcelis). Who were the customers? Who wasn’t! Intel, IBM, …Rose received a National Medal of Technology in 1996 for his work on ion implantation. He was awarded a PhD in physics in 1955 from London University.

I enjoyed this video clip from a panel discussion held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA, April 1-2, 2008:

Risto Puhakka Moderator: “A lot of the ion implantation technology really came from the– and still is in– the North Shore of Boston. What was the biggest contributing factor that it all practically came from there which is today’s ion implementation technology?”

Peter H Rose: “Well it started (on the North Shore) because that’s where we built the companies. It’s where we lived.

And in fact we did suffer– or maybe we didn’t suffer– from the fact that we were isolated from silicon valley. I’ve often wondered what would have happened if we started a company (there) my guess is that there would have been 20 start-ups in the second year. Luckily we’re far enough away that the technology didn’t leak out quite so quickly.”

 

from YouTube credit: Peter Rose joined a panel moderated by Risto Puhakka of VLSI Research to discuss the development of ion implantation. The panel was part of a conference organized by SEMI and the Chemical Heritage Foundation called Empowering the Silicon Revolution: the Past, Present and Future of the Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Industry, held April 1-2, 2008 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.

Nichole’s Picks of the Weekend 3/21 + 3/22

SPRING!

Not that it feels that way ;(

Pick #1

Thanks to Paul Morrison you may have already heard about this…but it is totally worth repeating!

Paul did a post about it just yesterday!

Alice in Wonderland3

We have always loved the school plays at O’Maley and I’m confident that this will be no exception!

Pick #2  

Sugar Shack Saturdays @ Appleton Farms

Spring is coming and the sap is running! Experience the time-honored tradition of maple sugaring with Sugar Shack Saturdays at Appleton Farms. Spend the morning or afternoon with us and see how we turn sap into sweet syrup. Start by getting creative with some maple themed crafts in the Appleton Old House. Then get outside and explore our very own sugar shack! Learn how we tap our trees every spring, see the evaporator in action, and even taste some of our syrup! We will end back inside with some delicious snacks, including Appleton Farms cheese and a maple treat, while we read a sugaring story!

Morning Session: 10:30AM-12PM
Afternoon Session: 1:30-3PM

Recommended for ages 8 and under but everyone is welcome! Space is limited. Please contact crouillard@ttor.org or 978.356.5728 x18 for registration.

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Pick #3

This is a little less traditional, but I’ve been meaning to let you know about it for quite some time.

A fantastic on-line computer coding site for kids brought to you by MIT

Check out SCRATCH here!

Scratch is a programming language and an online community where children can program and share interactive media such as stories, games, and animation with people from all over the world. As children create with Scratch, they learn to think creatively, work collaboratively, and reason systematically. Scratch is designed and maintained by the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab.

For more listings check out our friends at North Shore Kid

Beeman Students Plant Dune Grass

From the Beacon

Wicked Local Staff Photo by Ian Hurley Beeman School fourth graders Joshua Gibbs and Juleika Rodriguez, l to r, plant dune grass at Good Harbor Beach in Gloucester alongside their classmates, representatives from the Gloucester Conservation Division as well as Gortons on Wednesday, April 6. Over 100 students worked to plant over 7000 strands of grass to repair the damaged and depleted dunes.

With much debate happening around the city about just what to do with Gloucester’s waterfront, it might be refreshing for some to know that local youth are learning about the importance of caring for our coastline well before they reach the age that they have to make such decisions.

Students and teachers from Beeman Elementary School’s fourth- and fifth-grade classes recently combined with the Gloucester Conservation Commission and Gorton’s Seafood to plant dune grass in the dunes of Good Harbor Beach. The GCC reported that 7,500 culms of American Beach Grass were planted by volunteers from the school and Gorton’s last week, with Gorton’s footing the bill for the dune grass and sending 40 or so volunteers to help the students out.

The project is part of an effort by the school to teach students about the importance of a healthy coastline in a community that is surrounded by the ocean. It is a natural follow up to a similar school project held in 2010, which was funded by a grant from MIT and worked in conjunction with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

“It’s something we call ‘Living Blue,’” explains Beeman principal Ellen Sibley. “It focuses on the added responsibility of a coastal community to live green because we are the gatekeepers of the ocean.”

Read more: Students put in grass roots effort to replant dunes – Gloucester, MA – Wicked Local