Tag Archives: memorial day

Gloucester Seafood Workers Union WWII memorial plaque: Addison Gilbert Hospital

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1941-1945 To Our Hero Dead in World War II: Gloucester Seafood Workers’ Union, I.L.A. pays homage to the memory of these valiants who gave the last full measure of devotion to their country. Joseph Ciarametaro, Fred G. Gosbee, Roy G. Greenlow, Arthur L. Johnson, Eino Kangas, John J. Morrissey, Jr., Arthur J. Hanley, Edmund Patrican, Roger M. Phenix

Boston Commons public art: Robert Gould Shaw – Mass. 54th Regiment by Saint-Gaudens | POW MIA Freedom Tree | Boston Massacre by Robert Kraus

Three memorial monuments along a small corner of the Boston Commons by the State House  remind us of those who gave their lives for freedom.

modest Freedom Tree POW-MIA tribute

 

“The Freedom Tree: With the vision of universal freedom for mankind this tree is dedicated to Joseph Dunn and all  prisoners of war and missing in action. 1976.”

Read more about Maureen Dunn’s advocacy on behalf of her husband, Lt. Joseph Dunn, Vietnam War. Find the book, The Search for Canasta.

Boston Massacre Crispus Attucks patriots memorial by sculptor Robert Kraus

“In the Granary Burial Ground, in Boston, rest the remains of Crispus Attucks, Samuel  Gray, Jonas Caldwell, and Samuel Maverick, who, together with Patrick Carr, led by Crispus Attucks, were the first Martyrs in the cause of Amerian Liberty, having been shot by the British soldiers on the night of the fifth of March, AD 1770, known as the Boston Massacre.” 

Crispus Attucks was a longshoreman and whaler regarded as the first casualty in the Boston Massacre (‘the first to defy, the first to die’). In 1888, the state appropriated $10,000 for the commission. Robert Kraus was the sculptor and he worked with the foundry, Henry Bonnard Company of New York. The base and obelisk are Concord granite.

“The monument is of Concord granite, twenty five feet six inches high, and measures ten feet six inches at the base. The pedestal, which is round, except where a rectangular projection is made tosupport the statue and receive the relief is eight feet two inches high. The bas-releif on the face of the pedestal represents the Boston Massacre in King street. In the foreground lies Crispus Attucks, the first victim of British bullets; the centre of the scene is the old State House, behind which may be seen the steeple of the old brick or First church, which stood on Cornhill, now Washington Street. In the Upper left-hand corner is the following inscription: “From the moment we may date the Severance of the British Empire. Daniel Webster;” and in the upper right hand corner, “On that Night the Foundation of American Independenc was laid. John Adams.” Under the relief on the base appears the date “March 5, 1770.” Above the bas releif stands “Free America.” With her left hand she clasps a flag about to be unfurled, while she holds aloft in her ‘right hand the broken chain of oppression, which, twisted and torn, is falling off the plinth. At her left side, clinging to the edge of the plinth, is an eagle. Its wings are raised, its beak is open, and it has apparently just lit. Its pose is in unison with the fiery spirit of its mistrees, shown in the serious, determined, and heroic gaze of her upturned face.”

( And crushing the crown under her ‘Spirit of America’ foot.)

Read the archived 1889 dedication program which includes a letter from Frederick Douglass 

Robert Gould Shaw Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial

Robert Gould Shaw Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial Boston Commons by Augustus Saint Gaudens_dedicated 1889 ©c ryan 2018 March 1_ (3)

Robert Gould Shaw – Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, dedicated 1897, Boston Commons. (photo shows one of the eagles– and in the background  quite nearby you can find the POW MIA Freedom Tree and the resited Boston Massacre memorial.)

Joshua Benton Smith pushed for a memorial beginning in 1865.  It took another 20 years for a sculptor to be commissioned. A dedicated committee selected sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The tribute was unveiled and dedicated on Memorial Day May 31, 1897 (called Decoration Day at the time). Frederick Douglass was in attendance; two of his sons were in the 54th regiment. The memorial was cast by the Gorham Company foundry in Providence, R. I., at a cost of $7,000. The Gorham Company was contracted for Gloucester’s Fisherman at the Wheel memorial by Leonard Craske, and the Joan of Arc WW1 memorial by Anna Hyatt Huntington.

from the National Parks:

“Saint-Gaudens always strove for perfection regarding realism. In this relief he wanted to show a range in facial features and age, as found among the men of the regiment. This was the first time a monument depicted blacks realistically, and not as stereotypes. He hired African American men to pose, and modeled about 40 different heads to use as studies. His concern for accuracy also extended to the clothing and accoutrements.

“Saint-Gaudens, however, worked slowly. A committee member complained in 1894, “. . . that bronze is wanted pretty damned quick! People are grumbling for it, the city howling for it, and most of the committee have become toothless waiting for it!” It would still be three more years until the unveiling. In answer to criticism, Saint-Gaudens wrote:

“My own delay I excuse on the ground that a sculptor’s work endures for so long that it is next to a crime for him to neglect to do everything that lies in his power to execute a result that will not be a disgrace. There is something extraordinarily irritating, when it is not ludicrous, in a bad statue. It is plastered up before the world to stick and stick for centuries, while man and nations pass away. A poor picture goes into the garret, books are forgotten, but the bronze remains to accuse or shame the populace and perpetuate one of our various idiocies.”– Augustus Saint-Gaudens

“Many of them were bent and crippled, many with white heads, some with bouquets… The impression of those old soldiers, passing the very spot where they left for the war so many years before, thrills me even as I write these words. They faced and saluted the relief, with the music playing ‘John Brown’s Body’…. They seemed as if returning from the war, the troops of bronze marching in the opposite direction, the direction in which they had left for the front, and the young men there represented now showing these veterans the vigor and hope of youth. It was a consecration.” – Augustus Saint Gaudens

 

Not a dry eye in the place – Gloucester MA Memorial Day remembrance ceremony

Full house and major tribute. If you missed the ceremony, Cape Ann TV – 1623 studios- was filming.

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A reminder of Memorial Day Observances

Please consider attending one of our Cape Ann Communities Memorial Day Observances. On Monday May 28, 2018 we will dedicated our time to honor and remember the ultimate sacrifice bore by so many young Americans on various battlefields and remember all those Veterans who have passed away. We are brought together by the notion of preserving the memory of our loved ones and as Veterans, Gold Star, Families, Friends, and Community we will ensure that those memories never fade into the darkness.

Gloucester MA Elks Lodge #892 Capt. Lester S. Wass American Legion Post 3 Good Morning Gloucester Gloucester Amvets American Legion Post 98 Rockport MA Discover Gloucester Amaral Bailey Gloucester, Massachusetts Rockport, Massachusetts Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts Bridge Cape Ann Gloucester Sea Cadets – David G. Ouellet Division Gloucester Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps

 

THINKING OF OUR VETERANS

Hoping that all our veterans were able to spend the day in a way that was meaningful to them.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

To read about the origins of In Flanders Fields see the following from the Arlington National Cemetery website.

Motif Monday: Memorial Day, Gordon Parks, Poppies

 

Five reds five  whites five blues

Donald Sultan Five Reds, Five Whites, Five Blues, 2008 color silkscreen with enamel, flocking and tar like texture

Respectfully thinking about art that helps us celebrate, remember, remind and reflect every family who has suffered a loss in service.

 

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Gordon Parks, Library of Congress, 1943 photograph, Gloucester policemen, Memorial Day Ceremonies

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John McCrae, 18721918

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place, and in the sky,

The larks, still bravely singing, fly,

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the dead; short days ago

We lived, felt  dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

in Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe!

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high!

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields. 

Veteran of the Boer War and WWI, a teacher, and doctor, Canadian John McCrae wrote In Flanders Fields in the spring of 1915 while still at the bloody battlefront in Ypres, Belgium, in an area known as Flanders. The Germans had already used deadly gas. Dr. McCrae had been tending to hundreds of wounded daily. He described the nightmare slaughter: “behind it all was the constant background of the sights of the dead, the wounded, the maimed.” By this time he had already devoted his life to art and healing. He couldn’t save his friends. How could anyone?  Twenty years prior, he sketched poppies during his medical residency in Maryland. He published poems and stories by the time he was 16.  I’m not surprised he noticed the brilliant fragile petals and horror. He wrote for those who couldn’t speak and those who had to see. Meningitis and pneumonia killed him January 1918 after several months battling asthma and bronchitis. His poem and the emblematic poppy continue to inspire and comfort.

A few poppy images follow. I was thinking about their poetic illumination before and after WW1 and layers of meaning and beauty.

John McCrae sketch book 1896, Maryland

John McCrea sketchbook, ca.1896, Maryland

Read more

A VIDEO MEMORIAL: TO ALL THOSE WHO SERVE AND HAVE SERVED

This is a video I did about 11 years ago while working for the Virginian-Pilot and HamptonRoads.tv in Norfolk, Va.

An amazing friend and musician Todd “Tones” Jones produced and played on the track. He’s an amazing guitarist as you will hear. When I first heard this track, I immediately knew I had to create a Memorial Day tribute video. I filmed all the locations throughout the entire Hampton Roads area. (this was pre-HD, sorry) Please enjoy and share!

ARMY, NAVY, AIRFORCE, MARINES, COAST GUARD, NATIONAL GUARD…..THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE

Gordon Parks Gloucester photos Memorial Day 1943

Cat Ryan submits-

FSA/OWI photograph in the Library of Congress

Gordon Parks Gloucester photos Memorial Day 1943-

Gordon Parks, Gloucester Massachusetts. Memorial services for fishermen lost at sea.

Citizens gathered on the banks near the sea, May 1943.

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More Gordon Parks 1943 Memorial Day pictures click here

Rockport Memorial Day Parade Pictures From Tina Ketchopolos

Hi Joey:
Here are photos from the Memorial Day Parade in Rockport.

The Rockport United Methodist Church provided water to the many

marching honoring our veterans. 

Kind regards, Tina

Memorial Day 2010

This is what the Holiday’s all about.

Here are Photos of todays Memorial service at the

WWII Memorial on Stacy Boulevard.

05/31/2010

The reading of the names of all the Veterans who Passed away this Year

The Keynote speech

The Bagpiper did a Beautiful Rendition of Amazing Grace

My Father Paul Sr. and His Friend Grace in front of the WWII Memorial

My Father Paul F. Frontiero Sr. never misses this Ceremony. He is 85 years old and Legally Blind, but you can still seem him walking around Main st. and at the Senior Center everyday. Paul was a Coxswain of an LCVP invasion boat  in the WWII Pacific Theater. He Drove the LCVP in many Invasions such as; Saipan, Tinian, leyte and more I can’t remember at the moment.  He has some great stories of his time in the Pacific. Say hi if you ever seem him Downtown.

My Fathers Painting he did of himself and his Landing craft. LCVP

Remember

We who are left how shall we look again
Happily on the sun or feel the rain
Without remembering how they who went
Ungrudgingly and spent
Their lives for us loved, too, the sun and rain?
                                   – Wilfred Wilson Gibson

schooner flag

Stage Fort at the Ready