Tag Archives: Lobster Boat

Fish on Fridays

The Fish on Fridays series is a collaboration between Gloucester photographers Kathy Chapman and Marty Luster. Look for various aspects of Gloucester’s centuries-old fishing industry highlighted here on Fridays

This week we visit Gloucester lobstermen (father and son) Jim and Scott Rowe. Jim is pictured first and Scott stands on his boat the Miss Kelly. After a test run, Scott deems his new Cummins engine in working order for Saturday. He’s been waiting a frustrating four weeks for parts.

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Photos © Kathy Chapman 2013
http://www.kathychapman.com

The Rockport Fleet

The Rockport Fleet

The “Amie”

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http://art-rocks.org/

Video: Happy Thanksgiving from Captain Joes and Good Morning Gloucester

Plenty to Be Thankful For 

Brought to you by Good Morning Gloucester and the crews of lobster boats The Lady J and The Degelyse, and Brian O’Connor. Thanksgiving interviews with, in order of appearance, Joey Ciaramitaro, Ryan, Skipper Dave Jewell, Brain M O’Connor, Michael, Skipper Tuffy, Sean, and Frankie Ciaramitaro.

I’ve Got Plenty to Be Thankful For, sung by Bing Crosby and How Sweet It Is by Marvin Gaye.

Once again, a million and one thank yous to Joey and Frankie for allowing me to film and photograph from the dock at Captain Joe and Sons.

Toby Burnham- The Seagull Whisperer

So yesterday this Homie was on the roof of Toby Burnham’s lobster boat The Jupiter II with a striper plug with it’s treble hooks stuck in its leg and abdomen.  it was stuck hobbling around and in obvious pain.

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Toby was inside the cabin oblivious to the condition of the seagull and when he popped his head out the seagull flew off the roof of the boat and onto the roof of our dock here at Captain Joe and Sons.

Toby grabbed a piece of herring and lured the injured seagull back down off the roof of the dock and just as the seagull got within striking range he snatched it by the tail and held it by it’s neck.

 

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Then grabbing a pair of metal cutters he snipped the treble hooks to remove them from the feet and abdomen without tearing the belly out of the seagull.

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Moments later he was on the deck eating a piece of fish scraps Toby fed him.

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A job well done just a week after his 50th birthday.

Nice work Toby!

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Nice work Toby!

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The Gloucester Fleet

The Gloucester Fleet

“The Stanley Thomas”

The Gloucester Fleet

The Gloucester Fleet

The “Rosa Lee”

Ultramarine Allison ~ Carol

The beautiful French ultramarine blue of the Allison ~ Carol. The word ultramarine is derived from Middle Latin ultramarinus, meaning “beyond the sea,” because it was imported from Asia by sea.

The Allison ~ Carol lobster boat in the travel lift at Rose’s Marine.

From wiki: Ultramarine is a blue pigment consisting primarily of a zeolite-based mineral containing small amounts of polysulphides. It occurs in nature as a proximate component of lapis lazuli.

Free Ride

 A few Rockport Homies going for a ride and looking for a handout aboard the Lobster Boat “Amie”

Taken from Old Garden Beach, Rockport, Ma

Arethusa 04/22/12

Arethusa

Definition: Arethusa was a nymph, possibly the daughter of an Arcadian river god, and a follower of the virgin goddess Artemis. One day as she was bathing, she discovered the river god Alpheus desired her, so she fled. She ran as far as the island of Syracuse, but he kept up. In desperation, Arethusa called on Artemis to defend her. Artemis did what she could. She transformed Arethusa into a spring, but according to Pausanias, the nymph didn’t remain pure even in her transformed state. Alpheus had himself transformed into a river running under the spring so that the waters of river and spring might mingle. AND KNOW YOU KNOW.

 

Http://Art-Rocks.org

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Ayn Rand

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From Wikipedia

Ayn Rand (play /ˈn ˈrænd/;[1] born Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum, February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982) was a Russian-American novelist, philosopher,[2] playwright, and screenwriter. She is known for her two best-selling novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged and for developing a philosophical system she called Objectivism.

Born and educated in Russia, Rand moved to the United States in 1926. She worked as a screenwriter in Hollywood and had a play produced on Broadway in 1935–1936. After two initially unsuccessful early novels, she achieved fame with her 1943 novel The Fountainhead. In 1957, she published her best-known work, the philosophical novel Atlas Shrugged. Afterward she turned to nonfiction to promote her philosophy, publishing her own magazines and releasing several collections of essays until her death in 1982.

Rand advocated reason as the only means of acquiring knowledge and rejected all forms of faith and religion. She supported rational egoism and rejected ethical altruism. In politics, she condemned the initiation of force as immoral and opposed all forms of collectivism and statism, instead supporting laissez-faire capitalism, which she believed was the only social system that protected individual rights. She promoted romantic realism in art. She was sharply critical of most other philosophers and philosophical traditions.

The reception for Rand’s fiction from literary critics has historically been mixed and polarizing, with extreme opinions both for and against her work commonly being expressed. Nonetheless, she continues to have a popular following, as well as a growing influence among scholars and academics. Rand’s political ideas have been influential among libertarians and conservatives. The Objectivist movement attempts to spread her ideas, both to the public and in academic settings

35MPH Winds- BAH That’s Nothing For The Mighty Cabaret V

Got the day in yesterday while the rest of the fleet was tied up.  Won’t get these days back in February when the lobsters stop running.  Every day fishing this time of year equals 4 in the winter. sometimes more.

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