Tag Archives: HarborWalk Public Art Challenge

Gloucester street art is an all star

Worcester, the host city for the Ma Smart Growth Conference, is Massachusetts’ second largest city and pretty pumped with a 500 million investment in their ‘city square’ area. The city invested 8 million dollars into their ‘streetscapes’, including a skating rink. “10,000 came out for themed skate nights!” I’ve heard skating rink wishes mentioned once or twice in Gloucester: discussions pro I4C2 or somewhere on Middle Street (“a scene nearly Currier and Ives!”) and why isn’t the O’Maley skating rink used by the students? “We used to use it for gym? It’s an amenity right there.”

Other conference talks focused on investment in public space and public health. Worcester aims to earn the distinction Healthiest Community in MA by 2020. They have the first and only accredited public health department so they’re investing in a core culture.  The conference speakers spoke about housing, planning, walk-ability, return of multi-generational family households, and diversity. Millennials say: “Where do I want to live?” and then go. Their parents’ said “Where is the job?” and relocated. We were told many times that millennials are different than boomers: they don’t like traditional offices and buildings for work. They would rather walk, bike or commute by train. Ideally their life radius would fall within one mile, a neighborhood scale. How does that affect consolidating schools vs neighborhood schools and other debates ensued.

From a planning perspective: “Does the investment action help to encourage sprawl or does it invest in your community?”

 

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The session “Is Housing a Municipal Budget Buster” was led by Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport and panelists included former Gov. Glendening and Umass Dartmouth Director of Public Policy, Michael Goodman. Most questions went to Mike Hogan, who gave a talk about Oceanspray’s residential venture in Plymouth, Redbrook Village. Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce brought him here to speak to our communities a couple of years ago.  He said to say hi to Peter Webber🙂.

The second session I attended focused on arts and planning and was led by artist (ceramicist) and planner, Jennifer Erickson with Kenneth Bailey, Design Studio for Social Intervention (D24SI) and others.  A projected slide loop featuring model national art projects scrolled continuously. I was so caught up in the briefs that I nearly missed one picture from Gloucester: the monumental Parsons Street mural by James Owen Calderwood. Congratulations James!

Cruz Ferreras took the photograph during a block party; there’s a Cape Ann Art Haven painting in progress and kids leaping. Since that photo, street lighting and more art was added, a second monumental mural, painted by children, under the direction of Cape Ann Art HavenThe Gloucester Fish Net mural was a temporary commission that is lasting because the road is primarily used for walking. (Also, the artist painted it over a second time, and widened it.) With funding, Cape Ann Art Haven art center  or an individual artist like Jason Burroughs (who assisted James Owen Calderwood) could re-paint the mural. With funding and fresh sealcoating, we could issue a Call for a new work of art. There are several more walls along Parsons Street that could be a wonderful matrix for murals, or the streetscape for a dance or theater production. 

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Google street view FISH NET 300 foot street muralIMG_6891

CROSSWALK ART: next two site specific Justin Desilva public art

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

Justin Desilva’s 20 part work of art is titled, Every Picture Tells A Story. His crosswalk art enlarges and interprets HarborWalk story moment content through a combination of digital paintings that he’s printed and combined with long stretches of color field painted sky.

Here’s one by the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free library for the Samuel Sawyer story moment #31, an abstraction of the exterior and trees.

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Acting Director Freyja Sanger with artist Justin Desilva

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This one leads to the HarborWalk story post # for Temple Ahavat Achim across the street by the YMCA.

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The dory is on Main Street. The Harborwalk story moment #24 is over on Harbor Loop.

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Public Art: Two more Justin Desilva crosswalks downtown Gloucester

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

As a reminder, there will be 20 temporary mixed media crosswalks throughout downtown by artist, Justin Desilva (Rhode Island School of Design alumnus). Each one features different HarborWalk story moment content.  Special thanks to Ben’s Paint.

Here’s the TS Eliot work along the intersection of Washington Street and Main by Tallys. The HarborWalk Story Moment marker #2 featuring TS Eliot is further down on the path by St. Peter’s and Cape Ann Brewing.

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Comments included how the images change depending upon where and how one is looking (viewing the images through a lens, or viewfinder, from a distance, or up close).

This man thought it was fun to compare Justin’s ideas and process with Seurat and other Pointillists. The pug is unfazed by the new surface over his frequent path past Joan of Arc. The HarborWalk Joan of Arc story marker is #37. We’ll ask Justin about his ideas in another post.

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Today’s intermittent rain slowed down the process, but not the speed of the cars! (Drivers fly past Joan of Arc heading to the Boulevard).

Thanks to Phyllis Cucuru for spending time with us and supplying a barney trash bag. Feeling fortunate that Café Sicillia, Building Center and other businesses are open on Sunday as we had to make a couple of trips. Desilva was planning to complete Hammond Castle and one in tribute to the Dory (on Main Street by Café Sicillia and Short and Main).

Here’s the Hammond Castle site BEFORE looking down to the Boulevard and out to the harbor. There’s also a photo looking back in the direction of the Joan of Arc memorial.

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The 2013 Gloucester HarborWalk Public Art Challenge was a competitive, two-stage, open process established and administered by the Committee for the Arts (CFTA) on behalf of the City of Gloucester, and at the direction of Mayor Kirk and the City’s Community Development Department under Sarah Garcia. Funding for the purchase of public art was provided through a grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Seaport Advisory Council. The awards reflect discussions, community development, planning and determination to remember and work towards incorporating the creative arts broadly alongside other city efforts. Gloucester hearts art! For further information Gloucester Committee for the Arts

Have an idea? Want to get involved or volunteer? Please email friends of the HarborWalk gharborwalk@gmail.com or visit http://www.ghwalk.org

Art Update downtown: T.S. Eliot and Joan of Arc go large in Justin Desilva’s HarborWalk Public Art

Since winning a Gloucester HarborWalk public art award, artist Justin Desilva has been busy working on maps and plans, iterations of murals, experimenting with digital printing, paint, and adhesives under varying conditions to ready his site-specific project in town this summer.

Today, Desilva’s art ideas are underfoot, literally.  Walk by the Legion and Main Street to see the first two mixed media works for his temporary public art installation, With Every Street There’s a Story. People were so positive talking with Justin as he worked. There was so much energy and great shared stories.

Over the coming weeks, there will be 20 unique and temporary, mixed media crosswalks throughout downtown. Each one will feature a HarborWalk story moment through digital art and color field painting. Desilva’s goals involve the promotion of healthier people, neighborhoods and communities.

At work on Joan of Arc

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At work on T.S.Eliot

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Want to help? Contact Friends of the HarborWalk  gharborwalk@gmail.com

The HarborWalk was designed by Cambridge Seven Associates for the City. Everyone helping envisioned public spaces being used by residents, employees and visitors in an infinite variety (some have started):  relaxing, working by the granite markers, meeting family, live radio broadcasts, dance pieces, fitness and movement classes, art classes, movie screenings, cook offs, restaurant vendor tastings, poetry readings, theater performances, roving music, family programs, playground in a box, field trips, partnering with seniors, tours of all scope, education, on and on. Have an idea? Want to get involved or volunteer? Please email friends of the HarborWalk gharborwalk@gmail.com or visit http://www.ghwalk.org

Cambridge Seven Associate’s design included the irresistible combination of nature juxtaposed with our industrial harbor.  The trees and blooms, sustainable butterfly gardens,  garden lectures and more are all directed by the uber talented, Kim Smith. For the gorgeous gardens Friends of the HarborWalk contact Kim Smith directly kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com

The 2013 Gloucester HarborWalk Public Art Challenge was a competitive, two-stage, open process established and administered by the Committee for the Arts (CFTA) on behalf of the City of Gloucester, and at the direction of Mayor Kirk and the City’s Community Development Department under Sarah Garcia. Funding for the purchase of public art was provided through a grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Seaport Advisory Council. The awards reflect discussions, community development, planning and determination to remember and work towards incorporating the creative arts broadly alongside other city efforts. Gloucester hearts art! For further information Gloucester Committee for the Arts