Tag Archives: gloucester

MCELHENNYS SPIED AT THE LOBSTER TRAP TREE!

After painting buoys, the McElhennys stopped by the police station to meet several of the awesome Gloucester police officers. Dax could not have been more thrilled with his official Gloucester police sticker badge and officer cards.

Dax, Ruby, and John

WEST PARISH LOBSTER TRAP TREE BUOY PAINTERS!

Art Haven’s Executive Director Traci Thayne Corbett and Cathy Kelley are doing a fantastic job managing the fabulous buoy painting taking place daily after school. Today they were joined by volunteers Michael Kelley and Lianna Sours. The finished buoys are gathering in great piles all around the studio. Today’s ernest artists were representing from West Parish Elementary. Saturday, December 2nd, buoy painting continues, and is open studio day for any young person.

Michael and Cathy Kelley, Lianna Sours, and Traci Thayne Corbett

 
West Parish Elementary: Friday – 12/1 – 3:30-5:00pm
Open Day for Everyone: Saturday – 12/2 – 10:0am – 1:00pm
Rockport Elemenary School:  Monday 12/4 – 3:30-5:00pm
O’ Maley Middle School:  Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm
Open Day for Everyone: Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm
Manchester/Essex Elementary:  Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm

Lobster Trap Tree Lighting and Party at Art Haven after

December 9th, 4:30 pm, Main St at Lobster Trap Tree

Buoy Auction

January 26, 5-8pm, Cruiseport

Goodlinens Studio 1st Year Celebration

Gloucester’s goodlinens studio celebrated its first year in business with a Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting at 130 Main Street, where shoppers find useful, well-designed goods for kitchen, bath, home and gift.  Thank you to all of our patrons!

2017 11 30 Very Misc G15 Good Linens 050

BUOY PAINTING SEASON HAS BEGUN!

Art Haven was filled with the joyful sounds of happy painters. Today, Veterans and East Gloucester Elementary School kids participated in Gloucester’s traditional buoy painting. Tomorrow, Plum Cove and Beeman students:)

East Gloucester Elementary: Wednesday 11/29 – 3:30-5:00pm
Veterans Memorial: Wednesday 11/29 – 3:30-5:00pm
Plum Cove Elemenary: Thursday 11/30 – 3:30-5:00pm
Beeman Elementary: Thursday 11/30 – 3:30-5:00pm
West Parish Elementary: Friday – 12/1 – 3:30-5:00pm
Open Day for Everyone: Saturday – 12/2 – 10:0am – 1:00pm
Rockport Elemenary School:  Monday 12/4 – 3:30-5:00pm
O’ Maley Middle School:  Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm
Open Day for Everyone: Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm
Manchester/Essex Elementary:  Wednesday – 12/6 – 3:30-5:00pm
Lobster Trap Tree LIghting and Party at Art Haven after
December 9th, 4:30 pm, Main St at Lobster Trap Tree
Buoy Auction
January 26, 5-8pm, Cruiseport

BUILDING THE LOBSTER TRAP CHRISTMAS TREE #GLOUCESTERMA


As of Friday afternoon, and in preparation of building the Lobster Trap Tree, the base of the tree was aligned in a circle. Many more traps were stacked neatly in piles around the perimeter.

David Brooks and the Art Haven crew began building the tree Saturday morning. Around and around and around the crew worked stacking traps all day, carefully securing each and every pot with ties. As the tree grew taller and taller, the man on the ground passed the lobster trap to the next person in the chain, hand to hand, to the top of the tree. By early evening Saturday the last lobster trap was in place and the tree construction complete.

The Lobster Trap Tree lighting ceremony takes place December 9th on Saturday afternoon at around 4:30.

Teamwork!

Unlike in previous years where our local lobsterman have generously donated their working traps, this year’s brand spanking new traps were donated by Three Lanterns Marine & Fishing. The lobster traps are deep green, with lighter bright green nets, and red plastic escape vents. As Joey Ciaramitaro and lobster boat Captain Mark Ring explained, modern lobster pots are designed with in-trap escape vents, which allow for freedom of movement in and out of the trap by lobsters that are too small to catch legally. The larger in-trap escape vented lobster traps are one of the many ways Massachusetts lobstermen work together to insure a sustainable lobster fisheries for future generations.

A VERITABLE BLIZZARD OF SNOWY OWLS COULD BE COMING OUR WAY!

Snowy Owl at Captain Joe and Sons, East Main Street, Gloucester

Audubon “Birds in the News”
By Leslie Nemo
November 17, 2017

Will this winter bring an irruption of the Arctic raptors to the continental U.S.? A few clues from up north have Project SNOWstorm predicting yes.

Four years ago, thousands of Snowy Owls stormed the northern United States, taking up posts in surroundings drastically different from the flat Arctic tundra over which they typically preside. Some whiled away the hours peering at dog walkers from suburban fences; one learned to hunt around a Minnesota brewery with mouse problems. In a typical winter, around 10 Snowies visit Pennsylvania, but in 2013 the state was graced by 400. They were part of the largest Snowy Owl irruption, or influx of a species into a place they don’t usually live, the U.S. has seen since the 1920s.

If you missed it, you might be in luck. Project SNOWstorm, a volunteer-fueled Snowy Owl-tracking organization founded after that irruption, predicts another wave of Arctic raptors will hit North America this winter, according to their most recent blog post.

Scott Weidensaul, one of the directors of Project SNOWstorm, says the clues point to a big irruption, but the group also fully admits there’s no way to definitively know how big it could be or if it will even happen at all. “There’s a little bit of voodoo and black magic in all of this,” Weidensaul says. Though Snowy Owl migration patterns are mostly mysterious, there have been some tell-tale signs that the birds are on their way.

For one, some Snowy Owls already seem to be retracing the last irruption’s process. Data are sketchy and variable, but it appears that big southward movements occur about once every four years. That’s because lemmings, their preferred prey, go through regional population explosions at about the same interval. In 2013, those little Arctic rodents had a banner year on the Ungava Peninsula in Northern Quebec, fueling a highly successful breeding season for the owls that flocked to that area. Sure enough, this past breeding season, Canadian wildlife biologists studying caribou reported an unusually high number of owls flapping around the same area, reports others have confirmed.

READ MORE HERE

Snowy Owl and East Gloucester Kids at Bass Rocks

AN OTTERLY DELICIOUS BREAKFAST!

The North American River Otter is making an amazing comeback, not just on Cape Ann and all around Massachusetts, but in many regions throughout the United States. River Otters need unpolluted wetlands, streams, rivers, and ponds to survive, along with secluded places to den. Hollows in the banks of ponds and rivers make excellent dens and so do former Beaver lodges. As the perpetually-lodge-building Beaver has returned, so has the North American River Otter.

River Otters also need plenty of prey. Locally, they eat fish, frogs, snakes, and EELS!

This summer over in West Gloucester there appeared to be two Otter families, one mama with three pups and another mama with four pups. After watching the romp of Otters eat tadpoles and frogs early in the summer, by midsummer they had graduated to American Eels. I at first could not figure out what they were doing skirmishing around in the tall grass at the pond bank. Compared to diving and resurfacing with a mouthful of frog, this was entirely new behavior. There was much excited chortling when one of the pups caught an eel, which then seemed to set off a chain of eel ambushing and eating. One morning I had the great fun of observing three otter siblings chomping down on an otterly delicious breakfast!

First one pup catches an eel and brings it to the old wooden perch, which is also the otters favorite place to play hide and seek with each other.

Then the second pup, and soon all three were chowing down on eels!

The first one was getting jostled by his siblings and sought out more private room in which to dine.

 

American Eels can grow up to five feet long and weigh as much as 16 pounds. These Eels were about three to four feet long. American Eels spend most of their lives in freshwater and only return to saltwater to spawn and then die.

The pups deftly use their feet to hold fast the slippery eel.

Photographed on a different day, I think this pup is eating a snake. Notice the tapering tail in the above photo. 

Why is clean water so important for River Otters? Pesticides, industrial pollution run off such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mercury are absorbed by the River Otters prey. The chemicals accumulate in the River Otters, causing illness and death.

SUPER EXCITING NEWS: SINGLE USE PLASTIC BAGS BANNED!!!

Ainsley Smith from Clean Gloucester writes, “We’ve got some great news! Gloucester is now Massachusetts’ 57th municipality to reduce our reliance on plastic bags! Thank you to everyone who came out and spoke in support or sent in emails. We look forward to working with our City Council on successfully rolling out this ordinance and related education to all of Gloucester’s residents.” The vote was passed seven to one.Gloucester Clean City Commissioners Nick Lilades, Ainsley Smith, Eric Magers, Councilor Melissa Cox, and Bev Low

BREAKING: DRAMATIC CAPTURE ANNE ROWE FREED!

For a few moments she was on her side and I think I could hear my heartbeat. She righted herself, was towed away from the rocks by Unity, and headed home by her own power. 

The Anne Rowe became grounded at about 4:30am. Crew members self-evacuated onto the rocks as the Coast Guard was dispatched. Rescuers waited until near high tide before towing. The Anne Rowe was safely towed off the rocks by Unity at about 2:00pm, an hour before high tide.

Anne Rowe Heading Home Eastern Point Lighthouse and Mother Ann

BREAKING: LOBSTER BOAT ANNE ROWE GROUNDED ON EASTERN POINT

Anne Rowe grounded on Gloucester’s backshore at Eastern Point. The crew self-evacuated and the Coast Guard is waiting for the tide.

Lobster Boat Anne Rowe grounded on the backshore #gloucesterma #fishingboat #lobster

A post shared by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Rambling Rose and Lady J on the scene.

This is very close to where The Miss Fern went aground a couple years back-

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