Tag Archives: gloucester


For Immediate Release
September 24, 2015

Mayor Romeo Theken Announces Public Art Policy Meeting

Art consultant Elizabeth Keithline to present options for the presentation of contemporary public art of all types and discuss best practices.

(Gloucester, MA) –The City of Gloucester and the Gloucester Committee for the Arts will present the first of three meetings on public art policy on Wednesday, September 30th at 7:00 pm at City Hall, 9 Dale Avenue. The meetings will be led by public art consultant Elizabeth Keithline of Wheel Arts Administration. The public is encouraged to attend.In order to formulate how the City of Gloucester’s public art policy can best serve its residents, Keithline and her advisory committee have developed the following questions:

· What is your vision for public art in Gloucester? What would you like to see happen here?
· Do you have any recommendations on how that vision can become a reality?
· Name and/or describe public art in Gloucester that you like or don’t like.
· Do you have any recommendations on how Gloucester can improve its public art processes?
· Do you have any specific recommendations on what a public art policy for Gloucester should contain?

Over the past month, Keithline has interviewed many residents. At the meeting on September 30th, she will report on the results of those interviews, present options for the presentation of contemporary public art of all types and discuss best practices.

On Tuesday, October 30th at 7:00 pm at City Hall, Keithline will present to the Gloucester City Council on regional developments in public art policy and will seek the opinions on various issues such as Percent For Art programs, (for both private developers and municipal initiatives), gifts of art, deaccession, process of selection and decision-making.

Keithline will present her final recommendations at a third public meeting will take place on Tuesday, November 10th at 7:00 pm at City Hall.

For further information on public art: http://www.americansforthearts.org/by-topic/public-art

Contact: Elizabeth Keithline
Wheel Arts Administration


HarborWalk update few new signs replaced and repaired

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

News from the Gloucester HarborWalk. Over the last couple of days, you may have noticed that some of the permanent granite markers for the HarborWalk trail were shrouded. Replacement signs were required for some of the plaques. As with the original installation back in July 2012, new signs need a day or so to cure before they’re securely installed, hence the black plastic wrap. Sometime this morning they’ll all be unwrapped.

For the longest time there was really just one damaged sign, the map atop the Birdseye marker. It’s likely that one was yanked off, vandalized. The only one! I think that’s remarkable. Also, none of the signs were damaged by weather or general wear and tear. A couple had dramatic demises- backed into by a semi-truck, things like that. The rest suffered accidents similar to fences and curbs this past winter: snow removal required getting to places off the beaten track. A couple of signs we updated at the same time as the damaged ones. For instance the whale marker by Washington and Main had an illustration that was printed in reverse. We note changes over time. The raised symbols that people can trace and collect were installed two ways, both accepted practice and tested before. The one that seemed on paper to be the best process turned out not to be.

We’re pleased the signs are ready for Trails and Sails this weekend, Cyclocross and student field trips this fall. And for all the walkers. Currently there is one sign with some damage, the marker for Fitz Hugh Lane. If you notice other problems along the HarborWalk anytime, please email friends of the HarborWalk gharborwalk@gmail.com.

GLOUCESTER 18up and Under30: COOK UP SOME GOOD ART THIS SEMESTER and let your hometown buy Thanksgiving Break Pop Up Art Fair

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

Check out this great idea! Pauline Bresnahan, artist owner Pauline’s Gifts, mom of three (one a 4th generation Gloucester artist herself) had this great idea to help kids with the business side of art.

Save the date pop up art fair for gloucester college

Gloucester College Students

Thanksgiving Break Pop Up Art Fair sale and exhibit

Thanksgiving is a time to reflect on how grateful you are and remember others. We want to thank you by celebrating your art. Home for the holidays- or not- here’s a chance to show what you’ve done and add an exhibit to your CV! Way better than calling your mother. But do that, too.

Where: the HIVE part of Art Haven (established 2008!) amazing arts center is the host venue, 11 Pleasant Street, Gloucester, MA 01930.

When: One day only, Saturday 11/28/15, from 4-8pm, Thanksgiving break weekend

It’s also “Small Business Saturday” – just after Black Friday. Come downtown and support our local shops and young artists. BONUS! 8pm is still early night for young creatives

Who: Gloucester creative collegiates, recent grads, 18 up and under 30

What: Exhibit a sample of your art, any media (sculptor, song writer, musician, poet, jeweler, dancer, graphic designer, ceramicist) Take us from “Hey my kid could do that” to “Hey my kid did that!” and “I want it!” We’ll help figure out the display if you can’t. You are responsible for delivery and take away. Stay in touch for more information.

We’re in the ‘save the date’ early planning stage and hope:

· that you can be there in person to experience the pop up art fair exhibit and celebration, host your ‘booth’, network, and more. If you can’t your art can (and your friends and family at home can drop by. More than turkey for the empty nesters.)

· that you can sell something

· that a digital one page tear sheet for each artist is created

· that you buddy up with one TAG artist

· that a directory is fostered – like an alumni news so you can together share contacts and expertise, friendship,  and that you can build a contact list of people interested in your work

· Did you know that Pauline’s daughter, Kate, David Brooks (founder Art Haven) and Leon Doucette (currently working at Cape Ann Museum) graduated the same year from Gloucester High? What other local news will we learn?

Contact: Email Pauline Bresnahan paulinebresnahan@hotmail.com

if you want to exhibit, if you’re a parent of a college student who may want to hear about it, if you’d like to help, if you’d like to be a sponsor. Three artists have already signed up Kate Bresnahan, James Curcuru and Nicole Dahlmer.

PUBLIC ART and more: mark your calendars! ESSEX HERITAGE TRAILS AND SAILS 2015 this weekend!

Cat Ryan submits-

PUBLIC ART and more: mark your calendars! ESSEX HERITAGE TRAILS AND SAILS 2015 this weekend!


It’s coming! Here’s your annual chance to check out two weekends of 150+ FREE events throughout Essex County, September 18-20 and 25-27.

The schedule can change with new and wonderful additions, but as of today here are some public art and other highlights in Gloucester.


Climb up City Hall Tower hosted by City Hall Restoration

Gloucester HarborWalk: three self-guided walking tours including some new selfie postcard fun for the mini trail mobile tour. Also new for 2015, the HarborWalk historic exhibit along Fisherman’s Wharf by Latitude 43.

City Hall murals Talking Walls guided talk and tour 1:15  on 9/19  and open 1-3 on Sunday 9/20 hosted by the Committee for the Arts

FISH NET and peek at Art Haven/Hive mural in progress on Parsons Street’s private building

Hopper’s Houses Walking Tour, Cape Ann Museum      

Historic Art Trail Walk, Rocky Neck

Historic Ice House Tours, Cape Pond Ice

Maritime Gloucester and Schooner Adventure Family Games and Fun

Magnolia Library & Community Center’s

“It’s not a weed: food, medicine and magic of wild plants”

Tour of Babson Boulders in Dogtown

REI Intro to Outdoor Rock Climbing


Laurellin Kruse MMoAA Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015 copyLaurelin with the 1968 Cardinal trailer that serves as the Mobile Museum of American Artifact’s home.

The Mobile Museum of American Artifacts curator Laurelin Kruse is looking for donations from Gloucester residents. She is most interested in objects of a personal nature that tell a story about the owner. Stop in tonight at the Lanesville Community where the museum will be open and Laurelin will be accepting donations.

Laeurelin writes, I’ll be at the Lanesville Community Center tonight during the Mayoral Debates and Thursday at the Cape Ann Farmer’s Market. Otherwise I can usually be found at the Rocky neck parking lot [on the causeway to Rocky Neck] or check my Instagram (name: theMMoAA ) for my whereabouts. 

On the 24th at 7pm I will have an on open studio in the Rocky Neck parking lot where I’ll show all the artifacts I’ve collected from Gloucester in a final exhibit inside the Mobile Museum and will discuss my process and experience here. 
Until then, I’m looking for objects from people in Gloucester with personal stories behind them. People can email me at museum@themmoaa.org to set up an appointment to donate their artifact. Or they can come find me during one of my scheduled outings. 
This is all thanks to the Goetemann Artist Residency at the Rocky Neck Art Colony. 
Thank you!!
MMoAA George Sibley Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015

For more information about the Mobile Museum of American Artifacts, see E.J.’s previous post here: MMoAA.

and visit their website here: MMoAA

“The Mobile Museum of American Artifacts (MMoAA) is a touring museum of personal objects and their histories. Housed in a small vintage trailer, MMoAA travels from town to town, conducting an “archeology of the present” that uncovers objects of significant (and insignificant) connection to everyday American life. MMoAA’s presence in a city sparks a sense of local pride and inspires people to look into their communities for what gives them and their hometown a sense of place.

MMoAA is an exploration in the everyday, the local—the lives we live and the places we inhabit—and sees the present tense on its way to becoming a story, a thing regarded, the rough draft of memory.”

MMoAA surf board wax balls Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015

Surfboard Wax Balls

MMoAA George Seine Field arrowheads ©Kim Smith 2015

Arrowheads from Seine Field

Mini exhibit housed in a mini trailer at the causeway on Rocky Neck.

A photo posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on


Gloucester’s 5th Annual Overdose Vigil

Some pictures from last nights 5th Annual Overdose Vigil. A time to remember those lost and to highlight the epidemic heroin addiction has become; an issue Gloucester has become a widely recognized leader for coordinating police to get help for addicts, not arrests. Speakers told about their loss, experience and hope that one day there will be no need for a vigil. With candles lit, the names of all family and friends lost was read to close out the evening.


Coming next weekend, the 4th through the 6th, the spectacular 31st annual Gloucester Schooner Festival is an event not to be missed. Organized by the Gloucester Schooner Festival Committee and Maritime Gloucester, click here for a complete list of activities throughout the weekend.

UPDATE MA State House official Governor portraits come and go plus Dorothy Lamour

Cat Ryan submits-

I asked why Governor Baker selected Governor Volpe’s portrait for the Governor’s office at the State House. 

Here’s an update and photograph from the State House curator, Susan Greendyke Lachevre:

“I have attached an image of the Volpe portrait, which was selected by the governor himself, as is customary, for display in his office.  Governor Baker’s father served under Volpe while he was secretary of transportation In Washington…The State House is one of the oldest state capitols in the country, and the building is on the National Register.  Renovations started almost as soon as it was occupied in 1798 with the coppering of the wooden dome.   As a functioning seat of government and a popular visitor attraction, it gets a lot of wear and tear, and is constantly undergoing careful historic renovation or updating somewhere within its 600,000 square feet.   I doubt if it will ever stop.”

Catherine adds:

The official Governor portrait for John Anthony Volpe was painted by Pietro Annigoni, 1963. Governor Romney and Governor Cellucci also picked the Volpe portrait by Pietro Annigoni. What about Governor Volpe? For his first term, Volpe selected a portrait of Governor Christian Herter. Herter’s father was artist Albert Herter who painted the murals in the House chamber. His grandfather, Christian, owned Herter Brothers, the legendary 19th-century cabinetmaking and decorating firm. I don’t have a picture of the Governor Herter portrait.

For Volpe’s second term, he displayed the Robert Gordon Hardie portrait of Governor Marcus Morton (1840-1841, 1843-1844).

For Volpe’s third term, he chose a portrait of Governor Leverett Saltonstall III. The Saltonstall portrait remained on view through 1975 for Governor Francis Sargent. At that time the predecessor portrait was displayed behind the governor.

I don’t have a great photo of the Saltonstall portrait, but I liked the signing ceremony with Hollywood star, Dorothy Lamour, visiting the State House promoting and presenting a War Bond prize:

“To the winners of the Ward Bond prize awarded to the first set of twin War Bond Babies Contest…Whereas the Motion Picture Industry has been designated as the spearhead of the US Treasury Department September Billion Dollar Drive for the sale of War Bonds and Stamps…extend thanks to the Massachusetts Division of the War Activities Committee and the undersigned managers and theater owners for untiring efforts…” The Governor’s office looks packed.

Post 2


Post 1


Schoner Adventure Concert Under Sail With Marina Evans and Bernardo Baglioni

11845101_10153220549729585_1111632168866124104_oJoin us Sunday afternoon, August 23, at 3:00pm for an afternoon of acoustic folk under sail aboard the historic Schooner Adventure, with a pair of Cape Ann’s most acclaimed young musicians. Tickets are $60 General Admission, and $45 for members! For more information and to make your reservation, call our office at 978-281-8079. For more information about Marina and Bernardo, visit http://www.marinaevansmusic.com/, or her FB page: http://facebook.com/marinaevansmusic. See you there!

Naomi Lee shares her art in Gloucester and around Cape Ann. Also, This Sunday August 16th 2015 at The Magnolia Historical Society from 2-6pm. 46 Magnolia Ave Magnolia, Massachusetts

Naomi Lee (Glimcher Panarello) who has made her home here in Gloucester for the past eight years was a long time resident of Revere for thirty seven years and moved on to Marblehead for 18 years. She has been interested in art since early child hood. Always creating something from paint, mud and clay, she has even mentioned how she loved to get punished, knowing she would be sent to her room on purpose. It was there she could be secluded and create her art. She remembers painting birds on vinyl window shades. Also, one of a beautiful parrot that her mother gave to a neighbor who had mentioned how much she loved it.

At the age thirteen she went to the Museum Of Fine Arts and took a course in sculpture and that’s only training she has gotten, everything else was self taught. Because of her skills she ended up working in Parks and Recreation teaching children to senior citizens to create things from clay, later working at two different Jewish community centers one in Revere and one in Marblehead. For one season she was the Art Director at the Eastern Yacht club for the summer program. This was around the early 1990’s and continued teaching until the early 2000’s. Her last position was at Temple Emanuel teaching pottery in Marblehead 2002.

Two and a half years ago she was juried into the Guild of Beverly Artists, while looking to make money to get her car fixed, during that time she did five shows and many others on her own since.

There are many paintings to see of Gloucester’s landscape these happen to be a favorite subject of Naomi’s. Paintings can be done by photo or by eye. She believes in the warmth of the sun the calm of the moon the strength of the wind and power of sea.

Naomi calls this seascape of Good Harbor a miracle painting after a serious decision in her life and seeing the rainbow confirmed her choice. This is the product of doing so.

Naomi Miracle

Here are some other pieces of Naomi’s  art work.



My favorite of The Annisquam Lighthouse.

Come by and visit me Sunday at The Magnolia Historical Society from 2-6pm. Many great paintings by local artists, including yours truly.

My artwork can also be seen at the new Salem Art Gallery at 179 Essex Street. Open Thursday and Friday 4-8 and on weekends 12-6. My art is on display until Octobe

Naomi Lee contact


(781) 710-1080

WHAT’S THE ART DISPLAYED BEHIND GOVERNOR BAKER? Here’s a tip for all those political handshake photographs: please add the artist and art to the list of names

Cat Ryan submits-

Joey, Good Morning Gloucester is really something! After my post about local artists and art displayed in City Hall and the White House Collection, the artist, proprietor, FOB, and fun Pauline Bresnahan sent me a picture with a note. She was thinking about art at the State House:

“Yesterday the Mayor was sworn in at the State House (for the Seaport Economic Advisory Council) and she put some photos on FB and I was wondering who did the painting over the Governor’s shoulder in the photo that I attached and am sending to you?”

Here’s Pauline’s attachment


The dramatic harbor scene is on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and was created by JONAS LIE (1880-1940), The Fisherman’s Return, ca.1919, John Pickering Lyman Collection, Gift of Miss Theodora Lyman.

You read that correctly. His name is ‘Lie’. I know, located in the State House—the state capitol and house of government—the symbol of the Commonwealth of MA, politics and its people—it may seem at first an unfortunate selection when you read the surname.

Not to worry, his painting skills and life story are a great fit for the State House.

Lie was a well-known early 20th century painter and his peers considered him a master. One example of his stature and connections: Lie, Stuart Davis and Eugene Speicher were charged with the selection of paintings as members of the Central Arts Committee for the legendary exhibit, American Art Today at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. Holger Cahill was their Director. Artists John Gregory, Paul Manship and William Zorach selected sculpture. John Taylor Arms, Anne Goldthwaite and Hugo Gellert selected the prints and drawings.

Is there a Gloucester, MA, connection? You bet –and one you can see in many of Lie’s works. He was a summer traveler to Cape Ann before WW1 along with other New England locales through the 1930s because he was a mainstream American artist of his time. He had a studio on Bearskin Neck and lived on Mt. Pleasant in Rockport. Later the studio was Max Kuehne’s. 

Lie was born in Norway to an American mother, Helen Augusta Steele of Hartford, Ct. His Norwegian father, Sverre Lie, was a civil engineer. One of his aunts was the pianist Erika Lie Nieesn and he was named after an uncle, the major Norwegian writer Jonas Lie. After his father died in 1892 he went to live in Paris with family, before joining his American mother and sister in New York City the following year. They settled in Plainfield, NJ. After art studies, Lie found work as a shirt designer, took more classes, exhibited and received prizes. William Merritt Chase bought two works in 1905. In 1906, he traveled back to Norway to visit family and again to Paris. He was deeply inspired by Monet. When he returned he resumed his art career. He admired the Ashcan artists and their American style. Another trip in 1909 to Paris, Fauvism and Matisse. 

Lie painted the engineering project of his time, the building of the Panama Canal. The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Detroit Institutes of Art acquired a work from this series. The rest were eventually gifted to West Point in 1929 as a memorial to US Army Corps of Engineers Colonel George Washington Goethals, Chief Engineer of the building of the Canal. Goethals was credited with having the forethought to ensure that a record of the project was preserved in art. Art form(s) actually. Leave it to the engineer to appreciate the art and beauty in industry. Right?

Lie was invited as a guest of General Goethals along with Joseph Pennell who created the gorgeous etching portfolio The Building of the Canal, 1912. Goethals also selected artist William B Van Ingen to paint 4 large murals, mounted on site in the rotunda in 1915. The Panama Canal opened softly the preceding year, on August 15, 1914 as World War 1 eclipsed any coverage.

Lie was involved with the installation of the famous Armory show of 1913, and 4 of his works were exhibited. In the printed matter, his name shows up alphabetically between Fernand Leger and George Luks. See the 1914 journal advert. Charles Hawthorne urged summer students to Provincetown while the New York School of Fine and Applied Art hoped that students would paint with ‘Jonas Lee, one of America’s foremost painters’.  He was quite active in the arts community. He organized the Society of American Painters in 1919. He purchased a home in the Adirondacks to be near the hospital where his wife sought treatment for and eventually succumbed to TB. In 1933 he gave Amber Light, a painting of FDR’s yacht to the President, his friend.

Lie is known for his vivid color and impressions of New England harbors, boats and coves, painted during summer visits, his New York City scenes, landscapes, seasons, Utah copper mines, and the Panama series.

What about the Governor’s suite, the historic restoration, the Governor’s portrait, protocol and tradition?

The Massachusetts State House includes the state legislature and the offices of the Governor. The 1798 building was designed by Charles Bulfinch and was designated as a National Historic Landmark* in 1960. This magnificent landmark needed an overhaul and major renovations. Restoration has been happening throughout the structure, mostly for the first time in a century.  It’s difficult to invest in heritage and modernize facilities without public criticism. Years of research span terms. The Governor suite in particular came under fire for its historic restoration. It was expensive.

“The executive office now looks like it did in 1798, Petersen said. It cost $11.3 million to renovate and restore these 19,000 square feet of the State House, including the lieutenant governor’s office, constituent services on the second floor, and what will soon be an emergency response room on the fourth floor. The executive offices now have temperature control, wireless Internet capability, sprinklers, blast-resistant storm windows, security cameras, including some with facial recognition, and sensors that can detect if a room is occupied.”

Daunting! I can understand why Governor Baker selected the former Chief Of Staff’s office for his everyday office. “I want a regular office where I can spill a cup of coffee and not worry about it,” the governor said.

The Jonas Lie painting is prominent in nearly every ceremonial signing and photograph because it’s hung directly behind the Governor’s desk. It is difficult to find any mention of the artist and painting. When staging formal photographs if there is a featured artwork in the frame, it is my recommendation and hope that credit to the artist and artwork are listed along with people featured in the photograph.

The State House is working on their website and there’s a great virtual tour. Visit https://malegislature.gov/VirtualTour

So what does the Governor see from his vantage of the signing seat during ceremonies and meetings? More tradition, history, and art. Each incoming Governor selects a portrait of a former Governor which is installed above the mantel and across from the desk.  Former Governor Patrick’s choice was John Albion Andrew, Massachusetts 25th Governor. Governor Baker selected former Governor John A. Volpe, a North Shore Wakefield native, who served 1961-63 and again 1965-69, the first 4-year term in MA. He resigned midterm in his final year to accept President Nixon’s appointment to head the Department of Transportation. You can read more about it here http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_massachusetts/col2-content/main-content-list/title_volpe_john.html

The incoming Governor selects this portrait fairly quickly. Volpe’s national policy led to Amtrak. With the winter and MBTA crises at hand, comparisons can be drawn…I will ask! I haven’t been in the Governor offices. But Fred Bodin and I had a great look around earlier this year and Senator Tarr gave us a brief impromptu tour. Ask him about the Cod. There was an installation of local artists in the hall outside the Senate Chamber. 

*Boston has 58 properties with National Historic Landmark designation. Gloucester has 2: Schooner Adventure and Beauport. City Hall should/will have this designation.

Link to yesterday’s post https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2015/08/11/this-is-what-gloucester-looks-like-at-the-white-house-and-city-hall-its-all-local/

Also find it at Joey_C’s twitter http://t.co/upEgxcTajq

This is what Gloucester looks like at the WHITE HOUSE and CITY HALL: it’s all local!

Cat Ryan submits-

There’s a magnificent permanent art collection displayed throughout Gloucester’s City Hall, its public buildings and many outdoor locations. In an effort to promote, encourage and share current local art and artists with the public, Mayor Romeo Theken showcases a wide variety of media on temporary loan throughout the Mayor’s office. I took some photos back in February. She requested that buoys painted by our local youth at Art Haven be featured in Kyrouz Auditorium, along with the ‘Downtown Quilt’, the 13th panel from the Gloucester Neighborhood Quilt Project. These quilts are made by residents creating art with Juni Van Dyke, the Art Program Director Gloucester Council on Aging at Rose Baker Senior Center. (Twelve panels were prominently displayed for the 2014 Inauguration for former Mayor, Honorable Carolyn Kirk.)


Donna Ardizzoni, business owner, GMG contributor https://ardizzoniphotography.wordpress.com/about-2/


Ana Connoli, photograph, Gloucester from Port. Hill


Phil Cusumano, painting, http://www.philcusumanoart.com/


Tina Greel, statue, https://www.facebook.com/tina.greel


Jennifer Johnson, photograph


Ken Knowles, painting, http://www.kenknowlesfineart.com/ken_final/home.html


Marty Luster, photograph, GMG contributor


Bridget Matthews, photograph


Sam Nigro, painted oar, http://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/local_news/talk-of-the-times-gloucester-man-grows-a-squash-for/article_76b0f29b-1e05-527f-b676-889ee7768aa9.html


Shelly Nugent, photograph


Eileen Patten Oliver, painting, http://eileenpattenoliver.com/ and here https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2015/03/03/14-works-by-eileen-patten-oliver-at-island-art-and-hobby/


Premier Imprints, tea tray, http://www.premier-imprints.com/


Louise Welch, photograph City Hall


The local art on display had me thinking about the collection at the ‘People’s House’ for our Nation: what’s the best art inside the White House? No matter what is your artistic preference, Gloucester and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts could top the charts as the City and state with the best and most art ties featured at the White House. Let’s break down a selection of that Massachusetts list currently on display at the White House room-by-room, shall we?


In the Oval Office:

Not one, but two Edward Hopper paintings, lent by the Whitney Museum of American Art, are installed one over the other, Cobb’s Barns, South Truro and Burly Cobb’s House, South Truro.  There are more than 100 Edward Hopper works inspired by Gloucester, MA. The Childe Hassam’s painting, Avenue in the Rain, and Norman Rockwell’s painting, Statue of Liberty, remain on view.


In the Blue Room:

Fitz Hugh Lane’s Boston Harbor gifted by Lew Wasserman


In the East Room:

Gilbert Stuart’s Washington, John Singer Sargent’s Roosevelt


In the Green Room:

Sargent’s Mosquito Net, John Marin’s Circus, George Peter Alexander Healy’s painting of Adams and Polk and Louisa Adams by Stuart


In the Red room:

Martin Johnson Heade’s Sunrise, Bricher’s Castle Rock Nahant, more portraits by Stuart and Healy


In the State Dining room:

Healy’s portrait of Lincoln


In the Ground floor corridor:

Healy’s Millard Fillmore portrait, Thomas Ball Daniel Webster sculpture, a craftsman chair attributed to Samuel MacIntire, and Charles Hopkinson’s portrait of Calvin Coolidge


In the private quarters:

William Glackens Pavilion at Gloucester, and two Maurice Prendergast’s paintings, Boston Harbor and Revere Beach


More examples in the collection and in storage such as: Augustus Saint-Gaudens bronze bust of Lincoln, John Henry Twachtman’s oil painting, Captain Bickford’s Float; Henry Hobart Nichols painting, Gloucester Dock; and Worthington Whittredge oil painting, Thatcher’s Island off Rockport, MA.


Several artists are represented by more than one piece. How does the White House collection work? It is unusual for the White House to accept art by living artists. There are more than 450 works of art in the permanent collection. New art enters the collection after its vetted and is restricted to works created at least 25 years prior to the date of acquisition. For the public rooms, the Office of the Curator works with the White House advisory committee, the First Lady serves as the Honorary Chair, and the White House Historical Association. The private rooms are the domain of the First Family. Works of art from collectors, museums, and galleries can be requested for temporary loans and are returned at the end of the President’s final term. The Obamas have selected contemporary art, including abstract art, from the permanent collection, and borrowed work for their private quarters. Besides the Hopper paintings and John Alston’s Martin Luther King sculpture, they’ve selected art by *Anni Albers, *Josef Albers, Edgar Degas, Jasper Johns, Louise Nevelson, *Robert Rauschenberg, Edward Ruscha, and *Alma Thomas. * indicates works that have been donated to the permanent collection. The Obama Administration upgraded the website so that anyone unable to visit in person can have open access. I encourage visits to the website https://www.whitehouse.gov/about/inside-white-house/art. I love the diverse rooms and all the interconnected doors such as the splendid Green Room installation with the Marin and the Jacob Lawrence activating the threshold.


My gratitude to Chris Pantano, Office of the Mayor, Gloucester, MA,  and the Office of the First Lady and the White House Office of the Curator for various courtesies shown to me while I prepared this entry.

« Older Entries Recent Entries »