Tag Archives: gloucester

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION TO BAN SINGLE USE PLASTIC BAGS AND POLYSTYRENE

Please join the Gloucester Clean City Commission, Councilors Melissa Cox and Sean Nolan, and Seaside Sustainability, Inc. in supporting a ban in Gloucester on all single use plastic bags and polystyrene (Styrofoam) containers like coffee cups and takeout food containers.

PLEASE SIGN HERE

We believe this initiative is important in maintaining the beauty of our city and the health of our ocean and land. Given the availability of biodegradable and reusable alternatives and the economic benefits of the proposed ban, we anticipate support from Gloucester’s residents and businesses.

This proposed ban is similar to those already passed in dozens of cities and towns in Massachusetts (and counting) including our neighbors Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, and Newburyport. Cities and towns (and entire states – Hawaii) along the coast line of our country have been particularly vigilant in creating this ban.  Just between 2015 and 2016, bills similar to ours were proposed in 23 states regarding the regulation of single use plastic bags and/or polystyrene.  In a recent investigation of Gloucester Harbor using an ROV (remotely operated underwater vehicle), observers reported an abundant amount of plastic bags and Styrofoam cups on the ocean floor.

There are economic and feasible alternatives to these products that all businesses, large and small can stand behind and support!

This petition will be delivered to:

  • City of Gloucester, MA Mayor’s Office
    Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken
  • City of Gloucester, Office
    Councilor Sean Nolan
  • City of Gloucester, Councilwoman
    Councilor Melissa Cox

 

GLOUCESTER’S AWESOME DPW HARD AT WORK AND ON THE JOB!

Phil Curcuru shares that a new and improved boardwalk is being installed this week at Good Harbor Beach at the #2 location, directly in front of the snack bar. The boardwalk will be wide enough to be handicap accessible.

Thank you Phil and Mike, and thank you to the Gloucester DPW for the tremendous job they do maintaining Good Harbor, and all of Gloucester’s public beaches, throughout the year.

VIDEO: AERIAL FILM OF THE TULIPS!

A  very huge thanks going out to all of the hard-working folks at GenerousGardeners.org for helping add some amazing beauty to our little island. Keep up the great work!

$2400 Gloucester liquor license up in the air “feels like the lottery” and suggestions by Brian Hamilton

Another Gloucester Licensing Board meeting is scheduled for Tuesday May 9, 6PM at the City Hall Annex on Pond Road. Once issued, will it be flipped or will it be held?
Here are some scenes from last week’s liquor license meeting at City Hall. Setting local caps on liquor licenses is outlined here Massachusetts laws. Those in favor of caps feel the policy laws help residents weigh in on whether additional local licenses are desirable, and prevents favoring new business at the expense of established businesses including some that spent tens of thousands on permits. Those against it maintain that it’s arcane, random and a hindrance to economic development. There are year round and seasonal licenses issued. For example, Gloucester Cinema & Stage, the Cave and Topside Grill have seasonal liquor ones. It’s a rarity here. Holyoke added 13 additional licenses in 2015. This interactive Google map of MA liquor licenses dates from that time. You can use  +-  keys on the map to zoom in to Gloucester as in screenshot below.

Brian Hamilton’s thoughtful input at the Licensing board meeting last week:

 

Tulip Festival on the Boulevard

On a grey and wet day a great celebration and opening of the Tulip Festival on the boulevard with a blast of color. Accolades to all involved with this project!!! It was a fun time and congratulations to the winners of the tulip prizes.

Eye candy at the boulevard

A big thank you to all the hard work done by the Generous Gardeners and everyone else who made these beautiful gardens for us to enjoy….and tons of fun to photograph..  The Festival is Saturday morning starting at10 AM.

 

MONARCH BUTTERFLY PRESENTATION TONIGHT IN SALEM

Learn about the life history, decline of, current status, and how the use of GMO Roundup Ready crops are killing Monarchs and pollinators. Learn how you can help the Monarchs breed in Massachusetts during the summer months and on their annual migration to Mexico in the fall. Lecture and slide presentation at the Salem Garden Club. For more information, email kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com

Female Monarch depositing egg on Milkweed foliage and buds.

BEAUTIFUL CAPE ANN FOGGY DAYS

Greater Yellowlegs foraging in the marsh.

I have loved this past month’s atmospheric and textured, misty April weather. Do you recall an April as foggy? I don’t. Whenever out and about and a spare moment was mine, I grabbed my camera and had a go at capturing beautiful fog-shrouded Cape Ann.

Piping Plover

Trying out the new teleconverter–note the little tiny figure fishing on the breakwater in the photo on the left, which was shot at 18mm, and then with the 400mm lens plus tele.

Same focal lengths with Ten Pound Island.

And then the sun came out.

MICHAEL PERRINE CONSTRUCTION DISMANTLING COLLAPSED NORTH ATLANTIC FISH/CHANNEL FISH BUILDING

Mike Perrine and his team are on the job, systematically dismantling the collapsed North Atlantic Fish/Channel Fish building. According to Mike, the use of a barge and crane were considered but just the movement alone of the barge would have guaranteed even further damage to the wharf. Considerable expense is saved by manually removing the building. As Mike’s team is pulling the building down, the debris is being loaded onto a trailer on site.

The work area is fenced off and Mike warns that people not try to sneak on site. This is a very dangerous work zone. The dismantling can easily be viewed from I4-C2 and from the Cape Ann Brew Pub.

Michael Perrine

Mike and his son ZacK.

The two mastiffs are Mike’s and they are named Beauty and Beast 🙂 I didn’t catch ZacK’s dog’s names. Dog friendlies may recognize Mike and ZacK as they generously installed the waterlines for Gloucester’s dog park.

Booming off the water on Friday evening to insure debris does not contaminate the Harbor.

View from the Cape Ann Brew Pub Friday night.

For more information on the collapse see the Gloucester Times here. 

 

RAISING MONEY TO ASSIST JOEL CATULO’S FAMILY

Pietro Cannavo writes, “As you may already know that a friend and a member of our community passed away unexpectedly. We are trying to raise money for his family to help pay for expenses. Any amount will be greatly appreciated. Please find it in your hearts to help in anyway. Thank you. We miss you Joel.”

PLEASE DONATE HERE

UNDULATUS ASPERATUS CLOUD FORMATIONS OFFICIALLY RECOGNIZED

Last September we wrote about the rare undulatus asperatus clouds over Gloucester Harbor. According to WBZ-TV chief meterologist Eric Fisher, they were recognized by the Wold Meteorological Organization in March as an official cloud formation. The clouds could be seen over Boston the past few days. You can see a photos of the wavy formations here:  Good Morning Gloucester Undulatus Asperitus.

Undulatus asperatus clouds over Gloucester Harbor from Rocky Neck Railways

To learn more about undulatus asperatus, read more here.

 

BREAKING: NEW RESTAURANT ITALIANO ON MAIN STREET GRAND OPENING TODAY!!

Congratulations to Deo and Paula Braga, and their son Dominick, for the grand opening of the Braga’s newest venture, the restaurant Italiano. Today’s joyful ribbon cutting ceremony was attended by Mayor Sefatia, Ken and Kerry from the Chamber, family, friends, and Barry Pett, who was representing Senator Bruce Tarr. Located at 64 Main Street, Italiano is serving lunch and dinner daily in an elegant yet child friendly atmosphere. The menu looks delicious and the staff are simply terrific. For information about hours and seating call 978-559-7638.

Snapshots from this morning’s ribbon cutting ceremony.

Mayor Sefatia sharing history about Gloucester’s Militello family photo, circa 1952

PIPING PLOVERS HAVE RETURNED TO CAPE ANN BEACHES!

Male Piping Plover

The sweetest and tiniest of shorebirds has been spotted at several of our local beaches, including Wingaersheek and Good Harbor Beach. They have also been seen at Plum Island, as well as other Massachusetts barrier beaches, for several weeks. The Plovers have traveled many thousands of miles to reach our shores and are both weary from traveling and eager to establish nesting sites.

What can you do to help the Piping Plovers? Here are four simple things we can all do to protect the Plovers.

  1. Don’t leave behind or bury trash or food on the beach. All garbage attracts predators such as crows, seagulls, foxes, and coyotes, and all four of these creatures EAT plover eggs and chicks.
  2. Do not linger near the Piping Plovers or their nests. Activity around the Plovers also attracts gulls and crows.
  3. Respect the fenced off areas that are created to protect the Plovers.
  4. If pets are permitted, keep dogs leashed.

 

The last is the most difficult for folks to understand. Dogs threaten Piping Plovers in many ways and at every stage of their life cycle during breeding season, even the most adorable and well-behaved of pooches.

Dogs love to chase Piping Plovers (and other shorebirds) at the water’s edge. After traveling all those thousand of miles, the birds need sustenance. They are at the shoreline to feed to regain their strength.

Dogs love to chase piping Plovers at the wrack line. Here the birds are establishing where to nest. Plovers are skittish at this stage of breeding and will depart the area when disturbed.

Dogs love to chase Piping Plover chicks, which not only terrifies the adult Plovers and distracts them from minding the babies, but the chicks are easily squished by a dog on the run.

Please keep dogs leashed when at the beach. Thank you!

Female Piping Plover

*   *   *

Dave Rimmer, Greenbelt’s director of land stewardship, is giving a lecture about the Piping Plovers at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge on Thursday, April 27th, from 2:00 to 4pm. Preregister by email at: Andrew@ecga.org.

 

1938 no-nonsense classroom film New England Fishermen shows Gloucester, schooner, steam, and diesel trawlers

At the dawn of talkies, ERPI (Electrical Research Products Inc) sought to “bring the world to the classrooms” via 16mm A/V equipment and a catalog of films. ERPI was a subsidiary of AT&T and a forerunner of Encyclopedia Britannica Films.

They produced GLOUCESTER FISHERMEN (under 9 min) in 1938 with backing from Clark University. The film’s narrator was James Brill. There was also a 1938 film titled Shell-Fishing. 

from the A/V Geeks archive youtube channel

1938 ERPI film

Here’s James Brill narrating and before the camera in the 1946 film: FROM DEMOCRACY TO DESPOTISM, 1946, Encyclopedia Britannica Films.

Gloucester, Mass.: An Imperfect, Perfect New England Travel Destination

By Eric Hurwitz

Gloucester, on the North Shore of Massachusetts, is a worthwhile New England coastal travel destination, but not in the precious, slick and refined ways that have come into vogue lately by the sea.

Yes, you will find some great lodging, seafood dining, beaches, a classic harbor and so many earmarks familiar to a typical New England ocean vacation, but what’s overwhelmingly evident here is that it’s a working class community with a long fishing history. It is America’s oldest seaport, discovered in 1623 by an offshoot group of the Pilgrims three years after they landed at Plymouth, MA. You can see the history in the old buildings and homes, and the narrow crooked streets and sidewalks, Some of Gloucester represents the best of coastal New England, while other city elements show a need for revitalization. Gloucester certainly doesn’t share the gentle, gentrified look of neighboring Rockport and Manchester, but it’s just as much worth a visit for very different reasons. For example, Gloucester has done a great job moving the city in the right direction — especially the wonderful,classic seaport downtown with interesting little shops and restaurants, charmingly tucked away in the narrow streets around the corner from the sea. It’s full of character and doesn’t have a phony bone in its strong community foundation. This is the real New England, not some Hollywood set with all the latest retail bells and whistles full of elitism and attitude. There’s a humble, modest feeling here, quite understandable given the city’s working class roots.

– See more at: http://www.visitingnewengland.com/gloucester-ma.html#sthash.5tbNcbUj.dpuf

CAPE ANN WINGED CREATURE UPDATE

Featured: Brant Geese, Black-capped Chickadees, Black-crowned Night Heron, Blue Jays, Cardinals, American Robins, Mockingbirds, Savannah Sparrows, House Finches, Red-breasted Mergansers, and Common Grackle.  

Beautiful iridescent feathers of the Common Grackle.

Spring is a fantastic time of year in Massachusetts to see wildlife, whether that be whale or winged creature. Marine species are migrating to the abundant feeding grounds of the North Atlantic as avian species are traveling along the Atlantic Flyway to summer breeding regions in the boreal forests and Arctic tundra. And, too, the bare limbs of tree branches and naked shrubs make for easy viewing of birds that breed and nest in our region. Verdant foliage that will soon spring open, although much longed for, also obscures nesting activity. Get out today and you’ll be richly rewarded by what you see along shoreline and pond bank.

Male Red-winged Blackbird singing to his lady love.

Once the trees leaf, we’ll still hear the songsters but see them less.

Nests will be hidden.

Five migrating Brant Geese were foraging on seaweed at Loblolly Cove this morning.

Red-breasted Merganser Bath Time

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