Tag Archives: Gloucester Ma

Lee’s and JT Farnhams on top 10 favorites list for BRAVO Top Chef judge

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can’t miss Lee’s at Gloucester corner – there’s an Edward Hopper drawing of the line up of homes on Lee’s side of the street

Article link: “Want to eat like Gail Simmons? Here are 10 of her Favorite Restaurants in the country (and Canada)!” 

 

Lee’s – 2 East Main Street, Gloucester, MA  5AM – 1PM  (978) 281-3873  
At least one of us orders an apple cheddar omelette

JT Farnhams – 88 Eastern Avenue, Essex, MA
Open seasonally. Fried clams for me. My kids like that they brand the hot dogs. Founder of Farnhams from Gloucester.  

December 2016 view from JT Farnhams Essex

winter view from Farnhams

Bravo The Nosh blog Top Chef

Listen to Gloucester’s own author Hannah Kimberley live on NPR’s All things Considered!!

Listen Sunday August 13th at 5pm on NPR for Hannah’s interview about her new book A WOMAN’s PLACE IS AT THE TOP! (Some states may air at different times.)


Share the love folks!! Congrats Hannah!!!

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Do You Love a Fisherman? Fresh fish Friday

Where were we? Beautiful family on that flyer

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If you haven’t guessed by this photo, we were here:

Gloucester Market- Turner’s Seafood, 4 Smith Street downtown Gloucester

My friend tipped me off to the amazing oyster rockefellas they make and we’ve bought salmon and swordfish for special events. We’re lucky to have several places to buy fresh fish and we shop at all of them– though not nearly as much as we should. What is your favorite fish to grill?

Long Beach shifting sands and seawall: Rockport DPW targets nature and infrastructure

The other Singing Beach

As with Manchester Singing and other North Shore beaches, the white or “dry”  sand of Long Beach sings a musical sound as you scuff ahead. Lately though it’s whistling a shorter tune because there’s an astonishing loss of the dry grains.

Over the last 10 years,  so much sand has been washed away from Long Beach most every high tide hits the seawall. Boogie boarders need to truncate their wave rides else risk landing on the rip-rap.  It’s become a competitive sport to lay claim to some beach chair and towel real estate if you want a dry seat. On the plus side, low tide is great for beach soccer and tennis, long walks and runs. Bocce ball has replaced can jam and spikeball as the beach games of summer 2017.

Seasoned locals recall having to ‘trudge  a mile’ across dry sand before hitting wet sand and water. In my research I’ve seen historic visuals that support their claims.

Vista: Entrance from the Gloucester side of Long Beach

Historic photos and contemporary images –from 10 years ago– show a stretch of white sand like this one looking out from the Gloucester side of Long Beach to the Rockport side.

Long Beach

photocard showing the pedestrian walkway prior to the concrete boardwalk. Historic prints from ©Fredrik D. Bodin (1950-2015) show the damage after storm, 1931. See his GMG post and rodeo (ca. 1950)

fred bodin long beach after the storm

After the Storm, Long Beach, 1931   Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin (1950-2015) “Printed from the original 5×7 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #88657-134 (Long Beach looking toward Rockport)”

Fredrik D. Bodin Long Beach

Vista: Facing the Gloucester side of Long Beach

This next vintage postcard flips the view: facing the Gloucester side of Long Beach –looking back to glacial rocks we can match out today, a tide line that shows wet and dry sands, and the monumental Edgecliffe Hotel which welcomed thousands of summer visitors thanks to a hopping casino. The white sand evident in front of  the Edgecliffe bath houses (what is now Cape Ann Motor Inn) has plummeted since a 2012 February storm and vanished it seems, perhaps temporarily, perhaps not. It’s most evident where several feet of sand was cleaved off from the approach to the boardwalk.

EdgeCliffe Hotel and surf Long Beach Gloucester Mass postcard

 

Seasons of sand

I find the annual sand migration on Long Beach a fascinating natural mystery. It’s dramatic every year. Here are photos from this last year: fall (late Sept 2016), winter (December-  sand covers rip-rap), spring (April -after winter storms with alarming loss), and summer (today)

FALL

September 2016

 

WINTER

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SPRING April rip-rap uncovered, exposed. Climbing to the boardwalk is an exciting challenge for two boys I know (when the sand is filled in like the December photo it’s a short drop)

April Long Beach

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SUMMER July 14 sand is coming back though all boulders are not entirely submerged

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Storms (namely February) strip the silky soft top sand away and expose the boulders strengthening the seawall. It’s easy to feel alarmed that the beach is disappearing. By summer, the sand fills back, though not always in the same spot or same quantity. Some rip-rap expanses remain exposed. Most is re-buried beneath feet of returning sand. New summer landmarks are revealed. One year it was a ribbon of nuisance pebbles the entire length of beach. The past two years we’ve loved “the August Shelf”. (Will it come again?)

This year there’s a wishbone river.

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“Apparently you do bring sand to the beach, according to the selectmen appointed committee ascribed with repairing the Long Beach seawall, which could cost up to $25 million.” 

In case you missed the Gloucester Daily Times article “Rockport Looks to Fix Long Beach Sea Wall” by Mary Markos, I’ve added the link here. They hope to finish by 2025. I look forward to learning more and reading about it. If extra sand is brought back will high tide continue to hit the seawall? (In the past it could hit the wall or blast over in storms, but dry sand remained lining the wall.) Will the new wall occupy the same general footprint? Will it be higher? Thicker?

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GHS Class of ’74 kick back & enjoy Gloucester Harbor Shuttle charter

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“A lot of my classmates from GHS Class of ’74 chartered the Harbor Shuttle for a 2HR cruise around the harbor.  Our evening couldn’t have been more perfect. Old and dear classmates and some friends shared great conversation, an amazing night and a beautiful tour of the harbor where we all grew up. We all  brought our own refreshments and let Steve do the driving . If you are looking to find a memorable way to enjoy the scenic view of the city and want a great evening with friends you should consider chartering Cape Ann Harbor Cruise.”  – Pauline Bresnahan

http://www.capeannharbortours.com/shuttle.html

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FILMING SUPER COOL ASTON MARTIN ON GLOUCESTER’S BACKSHORE!

Atlantic Road was closed for a brief period of time this morning while an Aston Martin raced up and down the shoreline. One member of the film crew thinks the car is an Aston Martin DB9, but he wasn’t one hundred percent entirely sure. Any car buffs, please weigh in. Thank you!

Don’t miss the Alice Gardner art exhibition at The Bookstore of Gloucester | dozens of Fiesta books already sold!

The Bookstore of Gloucester
hosts
Alice Gardner | St Peter’s Fiesta Gloucester, Massachusetts
A solo exhibition featuring the original illustrations (gouache, pen&ink, some acrylic) for her NEW children’s picture book published ©2017 the 90th Anniversary of Gloucester’s St. Peter’s Fiesta!
Address: 61 Main Street. Gloucester, MA 01930
Exhibition dates: June 3, 2017 – Fiesta and beyond!
Bookstore phone: (978) 281-1548

SAVE THE DATE: Saturday June 17

The first St. Peter’s Fiesta book launch and debut reading will be held at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library as a special part of a celebration program for the 90th Anniversary Party of St. Peter’s Fiesta thrown by the library, The Bookstore and Caffe Sicilia on Saturday June 17, 10-11:15AM 

“After coming to Gloucester so much I finally said I have to get a studio so I can spend my days here!”

She did. Alice Gardner maintains a studio in downtown Gloucester, next to the Cape Ann Museum. She has lived on the North Shore for more than 40 years. St. Peter’s Fiesta is a subject Gardner has photographed, chronicled and painted for over a decade.

Gardner says that multiple programs and contacts stemming from the Cape Ann Reads initiative and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators were critical in getting this new book into production. “Just do it!” was a motivating topic from a Steven Pressfield talk sponsored by the latter. She did. She created an entire new body of some of the Fiesta moments that have touched her most, alive with color and completed in time to coincide with the 2017 90th year Anniversary. Gardner was also inspired by Anita Silvey’s Cape Ann Reads presentations. She said Silvey mentioned “calling all these celebrities for “Everything I need to Know I learned From A Children’s Book.” It made me think that. Why don’t I just call? I wanted to talk to the Mayor. I wanted to talk to many people…This is a Gloucester story. They all grew up with Fiesta. I did not. They became part of creating the book…”  Gardner’s generous acknowledgement narrative is given great attention in the design.

The new paintings on exhibit are not for sale, but you can see a small selection of Gardner’s joyous responses to the spirit of Fiesta in larger, earlier works at The Book Store; or call ahead and visit her studio. “I am inspired by public events that make people happy, they’re doing things where there’s a unique sense of place and culture.” Gardner painted a series inspired by Boston icons– like the Boston Common swan boats– for Massachusetts General Hospital’s Illuminations. She’s also captured the seasonal charm of Manchester by the Sea at Fourth of July.

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Studio next to Cape Ann Museum http://www.alicegardnerstudio.com/

The Bookstore has a substantial children’s book section The Bookstore of Gloucester Facebook link

Alice print exhibit at the books store for Sebastian Junger reading and Fiesta 2016 

Alice photos OF Fiesta featured on GMG

7 Seas Whale Watch adds a great preview for Sail Boston | Tall Ships Sunset Cruise June 16

From 7 Seas Whale Watch Reserve tickets online or by calling 978-283-1776

7 seasJoin us June 16th as we set sail to view the Tall Ships lined up outside of Boston harbor, in position for The Sail Boston Parade of Sail.

For the first time since 2000, the Tall Ships are visiting Boston! On the evening of June 16th the ships will be at anchor just outside Boston harbor awaiting the “Grand Parade of Sail” the next morning. This is your oppotunity to view these beautiful ships as they were meant to be: At sea! With any luck, you will also get to enjoy viewing the ships as they are illuminated by the brilliant colors of sunset which, thanks to the time of the year, isn’t until 8:23PM.This is a rare opportunity to peacefully view the Tall Ships away from the crowds and traffic jams of the city. So we hope you will join us for this special cruise to the Tall Ships in June!

  • Friday, June 16, 2017 ~ 7pm / Returning at 11pm
  • Departing from 7 Seas Wharf in Gloucester
  • $65 Per Person
  • Full Narration
  • Complimentary Hors d’oeuvres
  • Full Cash Bar & Galley
  • DJ will provide music & dancing on our open air top deck

 

Sunset behind the tall ships and Boston’s skyline could be a spectacular photo opportunity (weather permitting)

June 17 – June 22, 2017 – SailBoston17 Participating Ships

Joey’s post Check out the Tall Ships on five trips offered by the Cape Ann Whale Watch Hurricane reservations 

Calling all photographers: This may be the most famous photograph from the Tall Ships in Boston Harbor 1976. Can someone line up the Boston skyline and feature the Adventure during Sail Boston 2017?

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VIDEO: AERIAL FILM OF THE TULIPS!

A  very huge thanks going out to all of the hard-working folks at GenerousGardeners.org for helping add some amazing beauty to our little island. Keep up the great work!

Meredith Glaser Plum Cove Grind thanks her customers and best wishes for The Cove Cafe

The cozy business at 1064 Washington Street in the heart of Lanesville keeps pumping with a new name and owner, Alisha Clayton. Plum Cove Grind is now The Cove Cafe.

Mary is there early baking all the morning goodies.

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Grab a coffee and stay an extra moment to meet with Ward 4 City Councilor, Val Gilman, most every Friday morning. Chief McCarthy might be there as well.

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And for those wondering about former Plum Cove Grind owner, Meredith Glaser, she writes about her next chapter:

“All is very ok! Plum Cove Grind was a “life style” business. It allowed me to stay close and raise my kids and provide a nice business for the community and beyond( we had a lot of people from all over the world). Thanks to so many great customers. 

After 11 years in business, my kids are all grown up so I had decided to look for a buyer. 

The buyers were local people (Yay!), and I think they will do well. I’m thinking they will keep the great coffee and lattes and offering of yummy goods. So stay in touch, I’m certain it will be exciting to see what they do. 

Say hi to Joey for me.”- Meredith Glaser

The Cove Cafe entrance April 2017. A new custom sign for the business is coming.

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The Cove Cafe April 2017

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Semiconductor legend: you couldn’t make a chip without ion implantation| RIP Peter H Rose (1925-2017)

Rockport resident, Rose was a notable North Shore physicist and entrepreneur who founded seminal global manufacturing companies in Gloucester (Extrion Corp. 1971/ then Varian/now Applied) and Beverly (Nova Assoc, 1978)/now Axcelis). Who were the customers? Who wasn’t! Intel, IBM, …Rose received a National Medal of Technology in 1996 for his work on ion implantation. He was awarded a PhD in physics in 1955 from London University.

I enjoyed this video clip from a panel discussion held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA, April 1-2, 2008:

Risto Puhakka Moderator: “A lot of the ion implantation technology really came from the– and still is in– the North Shore of Boston. What was the biggest contributing factor that it all practically came from there which is today’s ion implementation technology?”

Peter H Rose: “Well it started (on the North Shore) because that’s where we built the companies. It’s where we lived.

And in fact we did suffer– or maybe we didn’t suffer– from the fact that we were isolated from silicon valley. I’ve often wondered what would have happened if we started a company (there) my guess is that there would have been 20 start-ups in the second year. Luckily we’re far enough away that the technology didn’t leak out quite so quickly.”

 

from YouTube credit: Peter Rose joined a panel moderated by Risto Puhakka of VLSI Research to discuss the development of ion implantation. The panel was part of a conference organized by SEMI and the Chemical Heritage Foundation called Empowering the Silicon Revolution: the Past, Present and Future of the Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Industry, held April 1-2, 2008 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.

Boulevard Public Works stunner | Gloucester is an early client for the Harvard and Olmsted trained landscape designer Thomas Warren Sears. His 1908 photos are a must see!

 

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The Gloucester Daily Times published this image in 1923 with the photo caption: “Now Under Construction on the Southern Side of Western Avenue, this Project When Completed Will Give Gloucester one of the Finest Approaches of Any City on the Atlantic Seaboard.”  The meticulously hand drawn credit within the drawing itself caught my eye as much as the drawing: “Proposed Treatment of Waterfront, Gloucester, Mass. Thomas W. Sears Landscape Architect, Providence RI”. Thomas W. Sears was a remarkable 20th Century landscape designer. The modern Boulevard work completed in 2014-17 gracefully carries out and returns to the original dreams for the Western Avenue highway and park that are more than a century in the making.

 

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photo caption: Boulevard construction progress © Catherine Ryan, December 2016 

Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966) preliminary designs for Gloucester’s future Boulevard

Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts, and grew up in this modest family abode at the corner of Beacon and Charles Street. This black and white house portrait was shot in 1897.

1897 Thomas William Sears the Sears family home Brookline corner of Beacon and charles streets

Here’s a Google street view photo for comparison today.

google earth brookline sears family home

 

After being ousted from the New York City parks department, the ‘father of American landscape design’, Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), launched his business a ten minute walk from the Sears family home.  The headquarters at 99 Warren Street was named “Fairsted” and was in operation until 1979 when it was declared a National Historic Site and transferred to the National Parks.

 

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photo caption: Frederick Law Olmsted Fairsted  © Jack Boucher, Library of Congress collection

Sears worked for the Olmsted Brothers immediately after receiving two degrees from Harvard– his BA in 1903 and his BS in 1906. (There may have been an earlier Brookline connection.) Rather quickly Sears left to set up his own firm: first in Providence, RI, when he did work for Gloucester’s Boulevard, and not long after in Philadelphia. In 1911 he gave a talk for the Proceedings of the Engineers’ Club of Philadelphia 28 (April 1911):147-158., “The Functions of the Landscape Architect in Connection with the Improvement of a City” available online as part of an urban planning anthology compiled by John W. Reps, Professor Emeritus, Cornell University.  I wonder if he shared his Gloucester photographs as part of his talk?

“There are two main approaches to cities: (1) On water by boat, and (2) on land by railroad. Along both of these lines of approach land should be taken for public use, and for very different reasons. Take first the use of water fronts: Unless some provision is made for the public, the whole water front, whether it be river or harbor, may be usurped by commercial enterprise and the public deprived of ever seeing the water except when aboard a boat. In certain cases, as in New York, where the water front must of necessity be utilised for dockage, a combination of commercial and public use may be successfully employed. There the docks are owned by the city and leased by the steamship companies; in this way their appearance can be controlled. At present it is planned to build on the tops of these docks huge recreation parks which may be used by the public.”- 1911 Thomas W. Sears

Mike Hale’s contemporary perspective shares a similar philosophy with Sears:

“An effort has been made in this paper to show clearly that landscape architecture is utilitarian quite as much as esthetic; that whatever one is designing, whether it be a city plan or any of the elements in a city, the design should be governed by use as much as beauty.” – 1911 Thomas W. Sears

By 1917 Sears was commissioned regularly and had a long, full career including notable designs for the Reynolda estate now part of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the wildly influential outdoor amphitheater for Swarthmore College, the Scott Outdoor Auditorium. His work in Gloucester is rarely mentioned.

Since the Gloucester drawing was marked ‘Providence’, I knew the drawing was done long before the 1923 construction. I tentatively dated the schematic ca.1910. Thankfully Thomas Warren Sears was a photographer, too. Turns out that this image is a Sears’ photograph of a lovely Sears’ design. The glass negative is dated 1908 which squares with his professional career timeline.

 

thomas Warren Sears rendering and photograph aag title a perspective drawing for the area along what is now stacy boulevard

ALL NEW LED LIGHTS

One of the modern design elements is the welcome ornamentation of lights. They feel like they were always here because line is such an essential part of design and they add the vertical visual interest. When I saw the new light bases I thought of the line of trees in the Sears drawing. I love the mix of natural and formal design in his rendering, but am equally gobsmacked by the sweeping open vista. Both are sensitive approaches and part of the context of the Boulevard’s build.

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photo caption: animation emphasizing new lights, late November 2016, ©c. ryan

BEFORE THE BOULEVARD- Sears photos

Thomas Warren Sears photographed Western Avenue for his preparatory work. See the homes along the beach that were later removed for the construction of the Boulevard; distant vistas to the Surfside Hotel (built after Pavilion burned) and Stage Fort park; and Western Avenue street scenes looking east and west before the road was widened.

 

Thomas Warren Sears seawall and park area1908 Thomas Warren Sears looking west along the seawall

Thomas warren Sears glass negative houses along the beach later removed for the creation of Stacy Boulevard

More photos and Gloucester designs:

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