Tag Archives: Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library

47 years ago today…the art of the first moon landing and Gloucester’s front page

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Today is the anniversary of the first moon landing on July 20, 1969. When I think about this momentous day, I mostly remember the artist Robert Rauschenberg, one of the established artists paid a tiny honorarium to travel to see space launches first hand. NASA gave artists total freedom to create any visual response if so awed. They were. Decades later, Rauschenberg agreed to loan rare works of art inspired by the space program for a solo exhibit that I co-curated. It was a big surprise when he scheduled a visit. He spent a morning at the show with me, closely observing each and every piece, some he hadn’t seen since he made them.  Many were created long after his residency. He was flooded; it’s very emotional.

Artist studio spaces and artist residencies are in my thoughts. As a reminder: there are two possible small and FREE temporary spaces within the inspiring Fitz Henry* Lane house that Mayor Romeo Theken has requested for Gloucester artists. Schooner Adventure and Sail GHS are generously sharing space within their headquarters in this historic City building if there’s a match. There are specific limitations and constraints. If interested in signing up for a month block of time, or to learn more please email sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov and leave complete contact information. *Fitz Henry Lane was formerly known as Fitz Hugh Lane. Henry is a longer name than Hugh which may help with remembering which name to use. (It took a long time to determine that Henry is the name.)  Sail GHS has extended an offer to artists to come sail and sketch with them, plein air plein sail.

While I’m in a wishing and reflective mode, may I add that I look forward to the day when all Massachusetts newspapers are scanned and searchable. In the meantime, the Gloucester Daily Times coverage of that inspiring moon walk is on microfilm at the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library. Enjoy the headlines and some local quotes from 1969.

“Older folks take moon in stride–They’ve seen a lot, but this one…” by Henry Meyer, Gloucester Daily Times

article excerpts including quotes from Arthur Jones, Mrs. Bertha Silva, and John Bordreau (91)

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This moon shot business: Can you dig it?  Arthur W. Jones, 67, who lives at the Huntress Public Medical Institution can. Jones and some of his fellow residents on Emerson Avenue have seen the entire panorama of the development of aircraft… “This is one of the greatest things that has happened to our country.” The moon shot had helped to “unite people together,” he said…“When this country gets together, they do things right. No matter what they start, they finish it.”

Mrs. Bertha Silva said that Lindbergh’s flight was exciting back then. However she agreed with Jones that the landing of the first man on the moon really outdid all other flying feats…

John Bordreau, 91, also a resident of the institution was delighted by the whole affair. Boudreau predicted that astronauts soon will be flying all over the solar system…”We’ll just have to wait and see where they’re headed.” Both Jones and Boudreau said they had heard there was oil and gas on the moon. Boudreau remarked, “That’s kind of a long drive for just a couple of gallons of gas. Jones predicted that within 10 years men will be living on the moon. Some scientists said over the radio that there were eaves on the moon where people might live. He said there was oil up there and that they might be able to extract water from rocks.”…One person said that at her age she tended to be leery of these things…Others expressed confusion at the speed at which this generation seems to be moving…

excerpts from Our men on the moon: ‘A long day’…a hazardous return, by Edward K. Delong, Space Center, Houston, UPI article ran in the Gloucester Daily Times.

Mrs. Stephen Armstrong, Neil’s mother who watched her son on television from her home in Wapakoneta, Ohio, noticed this: “I could tell he was pleased and tickled and thrilled,” she said.

“Magnificent desolation,” commented Aldrin. “It has a stark beauty all of its own. It’s much like the desert of the United States.”

“It’s different, but it’s very pretty out here,” said Armstrong, who lived in California’s Mojave Desert when he was flying the X15 rocket plane. Armstrong and Aldrin, both about 5’11” cast 35 foot shadows…Zint said he was surprised by the emotion in Armstrong’s voice when he stepped onto the moon. “That was more emotion than I’ve ever heard him express before. Even when he talked about things he was excited about like space travel he always had a calm voice.”

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Dogtown Days

Join the Friends of Dogtown to kick off a weekend celebrating Dogtown!

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, in collaboration with the Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library, a day dedicated to all things Dogtown on Saturday, October 17 from 1:00p.m. to 3:00p.m. Hear from expert panelists on topics ranging from artists inspired by Dogtown to the geology of Dogtown and everything in between. This program is free and open to the public. For more information, please email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10.

unnamed-1Whale’s Jaw, Dogtown. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library & Archives.

Dogtown Days is a celebration of the art, history, archaeology, geology, ecology and mystery of Dogtown, from the remains of its colonial settlement to its treasures along the trails through the watershed land and glacial heaths that lie at the heart of Cape Ann. Its 3,000 acres serve as the inspiration for Saturday’s panelists: Mark Carlotto, Mary Ellen Lepionka, Ed Becker, Chris Leahy, Ted Tarr, Noel Mann, Shep Abbott and Tom Halsted. Join these Friends of Dogtown as they explore the cellars of Dogtown, the Native Americans who lived there and the many insects and birds that call the habitats of Dogtown their home.

Following the Dogtown expert panel discussion, the Friends of Dogtown invite all audience members to join them for a reception with cake and ale in the Friend Room at the Sawyer Free Library nearby.

 

Annual Day in April is Simple Yet Profound – Kids Clutching Poems…

Catherine Ryan submits ~

unnamedQueuing and sharing. Poem in Your Pocket Day fell on April 30. The power of poetry and listening was unforgettable. Try it yourself next year—bring extra Kleenex.

Mayor Romeo-Theken encourages Gloucester students to send their original poem to the Office of the Mayor, 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA. She promises to read them! Students should include their name, which Gloucester school, their grade and teacher’s name.

Look for Poem in Your Pocket Day each April. It’s free and simple to participate. Carry a Poem. Share a Poem. For more information, search for Poem in Your Pocket Day (PIYP Day) Academy of American Poets (www.poets.org) or New York City’s excellent web site, http://www.NYC.gov/poem. PIYP Day started in NYC in 2002 inspired by theFavorite Poem Project established in 1997 by Robert Pinsky, former Poet Laureate of the United States. East Gloucester Elementary initiated PIYP Day in 2012 because it always celebrates literacy and arts. Students are encouraged to submit poems to the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library’s Poetry without Paper contest.

The honorary post for the Gloucester Poet Laureate was created in 1998. There have been four poet laureates: Vincent Ferrini was the City’s first, then John Ronan, Ruthanne Collinson, and the current Poet Laureate, Peter Todd. The Committee for the Arts helps select a new Poet Laureate every four years.

Special thanks to the students; Mayor Romeo-Theken; East Gloucester Elementary school teachers and staff– especially Literacy Coach Melissa Francis; EGS PTO; poet laureate, Peter Todd, and former laureates John Ronan and Rufus Collinson. Student Cal White read Peter Todd’s poem, Friendship, for morning message. Visit Gloucester’s website for more information and to read the poems shared by the poet laureates.

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CROSSWALK ART: next two site specific Justin Desilva public art

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey

Justin Desilva’s 20 part work of art is titled, Every Picture Tells A Story. His crosswalk art enlarges and interprets HarborWalk story moment content through a combination of digital paintings that he’s printed and combined with long stretches of color field painted sky.

Here’s one by the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free library for the Samuel Sawyer story moment #31, an abstraction of the exterior and trees.

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Acting Director Freyja Sanger with artist Justin Desilva

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This one leads to the HarborWalk story post # for Temple Ahavat Achim across the street by the YMCA.

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The dory is on Main Street. The Harborwalk story moment #24 is over on Harbor Loop.

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Mari Martin Trio concert at Saywer Free Library

Last week, the Mari Martin Trio (Mari Martin, Ken Steiner, and Mark Retallack) gave a fantastic, free, hour-long concert at the Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library. (A wonderful institution, but have they considered renaming the place to something that can be said with fewer syllables?)  Here are some photos.

 

 

 

 

Check out the matching shoes and beret!

This library and this trio are just a part of the cultural wealth of Cape Ann!

Fr. Matthew Green