Tag Archives: Gloucester Harborwalk

Gloucester majestic Boulevard construction: public works bringing the plans to life

FAST STATS

Contractor: Newport, Nashua, NH, Brian McCabe is the Project Manager
Status: in progress
Progress April 2017: nearing finish line
Project start (historic): pre 1900
Modern project start: 1999
Funding Awarded: 2013

  • from State: $5,600,000 Seaport Advisory Council
  • from City: $1,120,000 + contingencies
  • Funding in place: 2015
  • Gloucester seawall grants over the last 18 years include: Cripple cove/ Robinsons landing; small sea wall by beacon marine and pirates lane; fort square; Stacy (Stage Fort through Blynman); plus emergency work on Blynman collapse

Bid Open and contract amount: 2/24/15 approx $7 million
Contract completion: on schedule, estimated spring 2017
Locations: Stacy Boulevard and Blynman
Priority: Top Level! Unique and exceptional project– Mayor’s Office considers seawall boulevard a priority necessity, for safety, a centuries infrastructure project with immeasurable quality of life benefits for residents and visitors and essential to economy
Temporary work site chain link fence: Required. The chain link fence is installed by the contractor to protect the work zone and define it better.
Tender house at Blynman and bridge: These are State not city/DPW purview. The new bridge house is temporary (thankfully). The entire bridge needs to be replaced and when it is a new tender’s house will be constructed. I will write more about the bridge house and Blynman in other posts.
Local jobs scroll below

IMG_20161202_095731

photo above: fencing subcontractor on a beautiful work site readying for railing. Railing required diamond coring like old granite quarrying. Stacy Boulevard December 2016. 

IMG_20161202_094837

photo caption: Railing! 2000 feet of new galvanized railing. (The replaced railing was not galvanized. DPW replaces railing: it’s simply a matter of funding.)

IMG_20161202_100234

photo caption: Alex Karp – GZA Field Engineer Boulevard construction. The GZA company acquired (David) Vine Associates. GZA is the design engineer for the boulevard project.  David Smith at GZA (formerly Vine) has worked with Gloucester since 1999. 

IMG_20161202_093910

photo caption: Gloucester’s DPW construction along the Boulevard

IMG_20161202_093606

photo caption: CAP STONE! It’s more than decorative. It has two exposed sides that need to be trimmed to look perfect. Mike Hale, Boulevard construction, November (of course note beard) 2016

IMG_20161202_093005

photo caption: Stacy Boulevard contruction capstone and harbor

IMG_20161202_093354

photo CAPtion!: Stacy Boulevard dazzling dizzying scope of ocean and capstone as far as the eye can see

IMG_20161202_102206

photo caption: Mike Hale with Brian McCabe, Project Manager, Newport construction, November 2016, Gloucester Boulevard

LOCAL JOBS

Along with the Mayor’s office and current administration, Gloucester’s DPW and Newport Construction work with subcontractors including local ones such as:

GZA – national with corporate headquarters in Norwood, MA – Engineering

Gloucester Transit Mix Concrete, Gloucester, MA,  – huge part of project!

Cape Ann Stone, Rockport, MA, Bruce Johnson (owner) – granite

MBT Electricians, Gloucester, MA –  electrical and lighting

Essex County Landscaping, Gloucester, MA, J D Aspesi (owner) – irrigation and sod

Anne Gilardi Johnson –  additional new gardens, site and landscape design for the Boulevard (building upon the successful Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Memorial)– Johnson , a Gloucester native and multi award winning landscape architect, was commissioned by the Fishermen’s Wive Memorial board back in 2000 to design the landscape for Morgan Faulds Pike bronze sculpture, dedicated August 2001. “A series of design plans, and finally a study model, was produced as part of an interactive process between the designer, sculptor, and the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association.” Johnson is a member of the Boston Society of Landscape Architects (largest chapter of the national organization), “known for her design of urban spaces including parks, playgrounds, memorials and streetscapes in Boston,” Worcester, and Gloucester. Her award winning designs include Boston’s (James) Hayes and Childe Hassam Parks in the South End. Generous Gardeners is planting the new beds on the Boulevard: thousands of tulip and daffodil bulbs were planted by many volunteers last fall to bloom this spring!

IMG_20161202_093234

some prior posts:

April 2017 Part 3- Gloucester’s boulevard public works construction Part 3: compare high res plans from 1922 and 1923 with today

April 2017 Part 2: Boulevard Public Works stunner | Gloucester is an early client for the Harvard and Olmsted trained landscape designer, Thomas Warren Sears. His 1908 photos are a must see!

April 2017 nearing the finish line Part 1- 

September 12 2016- Stacy Boulevard construction update: historic Blynman the Cut Bridge project scope plans and engineering details

August 2016 

Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2017: the dates and titles for the free outdoor movies are…

Rob Newton, Cape Ann Community Cinema and Stage, announces the 2017 summer line up:

Save the dates! Six free movie nights begin Wednesday July 12th!

July 12 ::: Jaws
July 19 ::: Disney Moana
July 26 ::: Rogue One Star Wars Movie
August 2 ::: Lego Batman Movie
August 9 ::: The Princess Bride
August 16 ::: Sing!

July 12, 19, 26 and August 2, 9, 16. Rain dates  August 23, 30.

Over 5000 Cape Ann residents attended the HarborWalk Summer Cinema series in 2016.

Awesome North Shore 104.9 amps the pre-show festivities!

Contact Rob for 2017 partnership options.

Desktop10

ghw sc2015

Congratulations Essex Heritage on a big 20 year anniversary! And about that 2017 Trailblazers ballot? Go KIM SMITH!

Congratulations Essex Heritage on 20 years of leading Essex County by helping us connect, celebrate, and preserve our exceptional cultural and natural resources!

20161007_122443

Essex Heritage hosted Scaling Up! conference at Peabody Essex Museum October 7 2016. I took the group portrait on site intentionally– “Intersections” by ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA “meditation on what is universal in our shared human experience…”   L-R : Annie Harris, Chief Executive Officer, Essex Heritage;  Bob McIntosh, Retired Associate Regional Director, Northeast Region, National Park Service; Stephanie Toothman, Associate Director for Cultural Resources, National Park Services; Brent Mitchell Senior Vice President, QLF/Atlantic Center for the Environment; and Emily Bateson, Coordinator, Practitioners’ Network for Large Landscape Conservation

Essex Heritage established the Essex County Scenic Byway and annual Trails and Sails weekends. They bring stakeholders together as they did with Scaling Up at Peabody Essex Museum. They have partnered, supported and funded dozens of ideas and projects in Essex County including in Gloucester and on Cape Ann. Let’s do something easy that they’re asking in return.

Please help Essex Heritage narrow down that big, big list of worthy Essex County contenders for a special shout out at the 20th Anniversary Gala.  It’s up to us to choose which 4 Trailblazers will get a toast at the Essex Heritage’s milestone 20th Anniversary Gala on April 5, 2017. This idea is a very Essex Heritage thing to do: reflecting on what’s fine and good and sharing it around.

No surprise, I’m going all in Gloucester for this ballot.

Yes, they are all wonderful and deserving nominations, and you’ll recognize favorites throughout the county. BUT this isn’t an everyone gets an award type of deal. You have to narrow it down to one in each category; –  thankfully else Joey might need to add an arts rant 🙂 post.

Here’s the rundown as I see it. For Category 2 “connecting people to place” it has to be Kim Smith. She is a one of a kind and exceptional artist. Kim is inspired by the people, wildlife and the natural world all around us. Right here. We are so, so fortunate that she shares her visual experiences and art every day.

And she has memorably captured nearly ALL of the other nominees in photo or film!

Here’s the crib sheet breakout through a Gloucester lens:

1. Who is the best at Preserving the special region? CHOOSE ONE

Schooner Adventure, Gloucester

Cape Pond Ice, Gloucester

Good job to Cape Ann Trail Stewards, Essex County Greenbelt, Great Marsh Coalition, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge,  Thacher Island Assoc…

2.Who is Best at Connecting People to Place? CHOOSE ONE

Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce

Cape Ann Museum

Discover Gloucester

Gloucester HarborWalk

Schooner Thomas E Lannon

Kim Smith

Stage Fort Visitor Center

Also love Trustees, Ipswich Visitor Center (go Kerrie Bates :)), Rockport Art Association, North of Boston Convention and Visitors, but …go Kim!

3. Who is best at advancing our educational mission? CHOOSE ONE

Maritime Gloucester, Gloucester

Kestrel Education Adventures, Gloucester

3

also love Essex Shipbuilding, Buttonwoods, and Wenham Museum  

 4.Who is the best at Building and growing our future? CHOOSE ONE

Vote YMCA of North shore (includes Gloucester)

also love Peabody Essex Museum, Brooksby Farm, Russell Orchards, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), Essex County Community Foundation,  and Community Preservation 

Read more about it in the Boston Globe David Rattigan article

Read more

$100,000 outright NEH grant awarded to MA Center for Independent Documentary for Walking Cinema and 15 other projects in Massachusetts

The awarded project “Walking Cinema: Museum of the Hidden City” is headed by Michael Epstein, Untravel Media. You can see more about their work at www.walkingcinema.org including the one that is part of the Gloucester HarborWalk designed by Cambridge Seven Associates, and earned a 2013 Gold Muse Award from the American Alliance of Museums. Epstein also produced an audible original podcast, “Pen and Place”. Congratulations!

To see the National Endowment for the Humanities complete list of grant recipients across Massachusetts and the country: NEH announces $16 million in awards for 290 projects  

screenshot_010917_112457_am

Happy New Year! Onward

Dusting of snow along the back of Anna Hyatt Huntington’s superb Joan of Arc WWI memorial, such a multifaceted muse and Gloucester landmark.

Whatever brings you there– artist, subject, sculpture, setting, history –its surplus of qualities alone and together reward gaze and inquiry. I took several photographs early December 30th, careful compositions against a gift of blues and vault of morning sky. For this one, I roughly edited out the telephone wires for my thoughts. Shake off 2016 and frame up a fresh start for the year ahead!

img_20161230_063347

(See Joan of Arc HarborWalk story moment for more information.)

Haunting for Halloween: Pumpkin carving and poetry John Greenleaf Whittier & Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

Jack o’lantern traditions. There’s this – our annual amateur foray

20161023_191235

 

and then this public art tableau  that we stop for each year, just past 370 Main Street, Gloucester (before the Crow’s Nest heading into downtown Gloucester)

20161023_081522

 

20161023_081514-1

The history of carving jack o’lanterns includes a description in a Victorian era poem by John Greenleaf Whittier (b.1807 Haverhill, MA-d.1892 Danvers, MA; resided/buried in Amesbury)-  a Massachusetts poet, legislator, journalist, editor, Quaker, and abolitionist. Cape Ann, North Shore, Essex County, and New England appear in his prose. 

Excerpt from The Pumpkin, ca.1846 Thanksgiving poem

Oh, fruit loved of boyhood! the old days recalling,

When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling!

When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin,

Glaring out through the dark with a candle within!

When we laughed round the corn-heap, with hearts all in tune,

Our chair a broad pumpkin,—our lantern the moon,

Telling tales of the fairy who travelled like steam,

In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her team!

 

Whittier was a contributing founder of Atlantic Monthly.  He was wildly popular, successful, and influential in his time. He helped many other writers. Letters to Whittier “poured in at the rate of ten, twenty, and sometimes thirty a day, making all manner of unreasonable requests and sending innumerable axes to grind…” In 1887 “deluged by over a thousand letters and manuscripts at his birthday, he put a public notice…that he could not answer any letters or read any manuscripts…”* Schools, cities and towns across the country were named after him. “People seem determined to use my name lately in many ways. Within a week I have had two ‘literary Institutes’** named for me, and a big vessel launched last week from Newburyport yard carries “Whittier” in brass letters to her element. I hope I shall not next hear of my name attached to notes of hand!”
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps was “one of the many woman writers Whittier befriended, but their relationship was especially close. Whittier wrote her scores of letters during his life and they met often to discuss religious themes. Whittier once wrote of her: Miss Stuart Phelps was there-an intense nature-frail but strong-a Puritan with passion and fire of Sappho and the moral courage of Joan of Arc.”** Phelps spent her summers at the seaside in East Gloucester, and was equally compassionate about social concerns.
Whittier and Phelps joined other luminaries at gatherings held in the Cambridge home of James (editor/publisher) and Annie Fields (writer) and other salons.  Who might be mixing it up there? Charles Dickens, Mary Abigail Dodge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Dead Howells, Sarah Orne Jewett, Lucy Larcom,  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Phelps, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Celia Thaxter and Whittier. Jewett, Longfellow and others visited and wrote about Gloucester. Here’s a link from the Cornell University library to Phelps’ Atlantic Monthly article The 10th of January  about the tragic 1860 Pemberton Mills collapse and fire in Lawrence, MA*** (estimated 90-200+ killed), less known than the horrific 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire (146 killed).
*Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier 1861-1892, Volumes I II III, 1975, Harvard, edited by John B. Pickard. Fun read!  We’re told one of the colleges was Whittier college, Salem, Iowa
**ditto above and below any mentions from letters in the timeline

Selected Whittier links and timeline bits:

1908 poem: The Gloucester Mother, by Sarah Orne Jewett, copy of McClure’s Magazine where it first was published: http://www.unz.org/Pub/McClures-1908oct-00702
1888: Whittier “Was there ever such a droll thing?”** letter to Annie Adams Fields gossiping and happy for Elizabeth Stuart Phelps in love with a younger man “Love seems to have cured her…I feel rather aggrieved that I wasn’t consulted.” He calls her E.S.P.  To Celia Thaxter who Whittier visited on the Isle of Shoals, “treasuring evenings in her parlor room where she told ghost stories or they exchanged folk tales:   “What do you think of Eliza Stuart’s marriage to young Ward? He is a good fellow and Elizabeth for once in her life is happy!” Phelps married Herbert Dickinson Ward in 1888–he was 27 and she was 44. It didn’t go well: she bucked his surname within three years and wrote Confessions of a Wife in 1902.
1888 Whittier letter to Annie Fields after editing a new edition of his poetry: “I hope I am correcting a little of the bad grammar, and rhythmical blunders, which have so long annoyed my friends who have graduated from Harvard instead of a country district school.”
1886 Whittier poem: To a Cape Ann Schooner
1886 Whittier letter mentioning Elizabeth Stuart Phelps sending a “very pretty shade of fine lace work…because of its exquisite color” gift on Christmas Eve, which Whittier re-gifted 🙂
1884 Whittier letter to Annie Fields: “Have you seen Elizabeth Phelps lately? I am not in favor of capital punishment, but the burglars who robbed her of her hard earnings would fare hard if I were on the jury that tried them…”
1882 Whittier letter “The world can no longer be to me what it was while Emerson and Longfellow lived. They should have outlived me, for Emerson was never sick, and Longfellow until the last two years had splendid health. A feeling of loneliness and isolation oppresses me. But as Emerson said to me the last time I saw him ‘the time is short’ “ collection of Swarthmore college
1879 Whittier letter to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps: “Dr. Bowditch says that a man of active brain ought to make a fool of himself occasionally and unbend at all hazards to his dignity.” admittedly hard for these two
1877  Mark Twain (work friend),  Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow at Whittier’s 70th birthday celebration. Hawthorne and Whittier were not exactly fans of each other’s works.
1873: Whittier thank you note to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps for sending her book
1868: Whittier letter to Annie Fields complimenting Elizabeth Stuart Phelps The Gates Ajar “Good in itself and full of promise.” 1869 he’s promoting it to Harriet Minot Pittman
1868 Whittier thank you note to James Thomas Field for paying him the $1500 check
1866 Whittier poem: Snow bound: A Winter Idyll  his bestseller and dedicated to his family- memories from childhood
1857 Whittier poem: Garrison of Cape Ann* opens with a view of Cape Ann as seen from Po Hill: “From the hills of home forth looking, far beneath the tent-like span,
Of the sky, I see the white gleam headland of Cape Ann.” For readers that have come this far–the complete Garrison of Cape Ann follows the break.
1843 Whittier poem: Massachusetts to Virginia (in reference to George Latimer, alleged fugitive slave) “The fishing smacks of Marblehead, the sea-boats of Cape Ann…”  Woodie Guthrie 1958 This Land is Your Land feels like a 20th Century connection.

Read more

Live blogging- passengers come ashore in Gloucester from Holland America cruise ship Zuiderdam.

Happy travelers are such a joy! Meet Dean and Cathy King from Adelaide. They went to Washington and New York where they caught this Holland America cruise to Canada. They said the entertainment director outlined the demographics: 110 Aussies, 700 or so Canadians, 700 or so Americans, many countries represented by 10+ passengers and 13 New Zealanders, “to be precise.” They were squaring away their plans in Cruiseport until an 11:45AM tour to Rockport, and later walking downtown Gloucester. Their friends signed up for an 8AM tour. I spent time in Adelaide and loved it. I hope they have as great a time here, and memorable trip all around.

20160909_110039

Before reaching Cruiseport, passengers like the Kings are shuttled ashore by tender boats.

Screenshot_090916_115936_AM.jpg

The tenders hold more people than you think!

20160909_104140

As they came ashore they were greeted with soaring vocals of Three Sheets to the Wind.

20160909_104038

What a reception! Many visitors stopped to take their photo.

20160909_104226

Passengers stream upstairs to happy greeters.

20160909_104407

The lines ebb and flow with every tender.

20160909_103921

20160909_104321-1

Maps and brochures are selected as passengers head outside to enjoy a day in Gloucester and Cape Ann.

20160909_110505

Volunteers like Peter Webber, Kathie Gilson, Lorre Anderson,  Charlene, Linn, Jeanne, and Elizabeth helping passengers

20160909_103342

CATA trolley route

20160908_174129

20160909_121531

HarborWalk map is popular

Happy helpful greeting at the CATA table. How could it be otherwise–Heidi Dallin!

 

20160909_103405

20160909_110524

20160909_103842

Passengers heading downtown on the CATA trolley while others stand waiting for a CATA scenic bus.

20160909_103145-1

screenshot_090816_085001_am

Unidentified American artist, “It’s good to be on a well-run ship, Holland America Line,” mid 20th century, ink on paper, gift of Stephen S Lash, 2010, collection of Peabody Essex Museum. The museum is featuring the art of Ocean Liners: glamour, speed, and style on view May-October 2017

 

Art museums in Massachusetts are closer than they appear. Gloucester, Google maps and upcoming exhibitions

 

museums-in-massachusetts-in-google-maps-by-catherine-ryan

Last week I was in the Amherst area to meet with clients at a museum. I added on a couple of exhibitions that I knew were closing before I’d be back in that area. I have to map out shows or I miss them.

If you do an online search for ‘art museums in Massachusetts’ or ‘best of’ museum inquiries there are several helpful lists that pop up. The New England Museum Association for one has stepped up their digital presence for their membership directory. Still, must-see institutions on the North Shore and Cape Ann are rarely high lighted, buried deeply, and frequently absent from compilation lists ( see omissions at Artcyclopedia, Massvacation, Tripadvisor, visit Massachusetts, art-collecting, etc.)

Here’s a link to Massachusetts Art Museums created in Google maps. Part 2 Massachusetts 2016 fall/winter museum exhibition guide coming!

Upcoming show trends include: illuminated manuscripts, citizenship, art of picture books, and vintage and contemporary photography.

 

 

 

The waze and wikipedia of bird sightings- Ebird, crowdsourcing since 2002- shows Gloucester whale watching great for birding and

The online database collaboration of Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society compiles aggregate data from engaged birders. What a staggering quantity of volunteers taking the time to share and record data!

Although Cape Ann towns are not ‘hot spots’

it’s fun to sift through the information and peek at some public competition. The top 100 birders in MA are predominantly male.  (We know Cape Ann is a birding hot spot though it may not be a recording hot spot.) There are plenty of reports from scenic North Shore sites: Cranes Beach, Plum Island, Chewbacco Woods, Coolidge Reservation, Eastern Point, and Halibut Point. Less traveled spots such as ‘Lanesville Community garden’ and local cemeteries have a diary entry feel to them and fun to peruse. Checklists indicate the distance and effort taken for any given outing, and the duration, often significant.

There are scores of reports from Gloucester whale watch trips –customers and staff. Look for ‘Stellwagen Bank’ as a listed location. I think I’d like the location column added to one default screen, and a category for whale watching.

ebird

Screenshot_073016_054904_AM

Screenshot_073016_070550_AM Screenshot_073016_064734_AM

 

Screenshot_073016_064814_AM

 

eBird: An online database of bird distribution and abundance. eBird, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Available: http://www.ebird.org. (Accessed: Date [July 30, 2016]).

Gloucester HarborWalk marker for birds/birding is located along the walkway by Gloucester House, I4C2, and Topside Grill.

Gloucester HarborWalk marker for whales is located just outside Tonno.

SEVEN SEAS WHALE WATCH +1-888-283-1776
CAPE ANN WHALE WATCH +1-800-877-5110
CAPT BILL & SONS +1-800-339-4253
YANKEE FLEET +1-978-283-0313

 

Sculpture Walk

The boys and I went up to Meredith, New Hampshire earlier this week to spend some time at a friend’s lake house.  As we walked into the town of Meredith for dinner one night we I was stricken by how lovely it was to be able to appreciate some gorgeous art installations along the way.  34 sculptures in all dot the lakefront and beautify the town.  For the 3rd year in a row the town of Meredith has welcomed artists from throughout the Northeast to display their work as part of the Meredith Sculpture Walk.  Since its beginning, some of the sculptures have actually been donated to the town to serve as permanent art to be appreciated year after year.  Many others are refreshed yearly….giving new artists the opportunity to participate and residents and visitors the opportunity to appreciate new pieces of art.

It reminded me of our very own Gloucester HarborWalk.  Something else that I am completely in love with.  If you have not taken the opportunity to complete the walk and read the 42 stories that tell Gloucester’s rich history, you really should.

READ MORE ABOUT THE GLOUCESTER HARBORWALK HERE

READ MORE ABOUT THE MEREDITH SCULPTURE WALK HERE

Below is a map of the Sculpture Walk and just a few of the installations

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 9.57.14 PM

Finding Nemo fun at HarborWalk Summer Cinema

What a treat! I wish everyone could have heard the hundreds of happy cries of  “Mine. Mine. Mine.” with each unforgettable Finding Nemo seagull scene. This was real life surround sound right at Gloucester’s harbor, seagulls aloft and searching in the enveloping night.

IMG9568631

6pm–hundreds more will stream in before the movie starts!

IMG9568641 rn4

Aurelia Nelson 104.9 Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016

 

IMG9568721 rn2

Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2016 Awesome vendors

IMG9568711 rn3

OPEN DOOR at Gloucester HarborWalk 2016 Summer Cinema, with pre movie family activities and canned food drive. Finding Nemo sponsor

Thanks Rob, Cape Ann Community Cinema & Stage, for the community movie nights and for taking these photos. I didn’t bring my camera and was too busy eating even if I had!  What did we carry in and carry home?  On the way to the movies, we walked over to purchase delicious take-out subs from Leonardos for a picnic, and bug spray (not needed it turned out) and sundries from Walgreens. From the vendors at the outdoor movies we picked out candy, Kettlecorn and slush. We didn’t have the fried dough but there’s always next week!

Finding Nemo was the second movie of five FREE outdoor movies hosted by the City of Gloucester HarborWalk through the Cape Ann Community Cinema. Aurelia from North Shore 104.9 and Open Door hosted the festive pre-screening gathering.

The three premier sponsors for the HarborWalk Summer Cinema are North Shore 104.9, Cape Ann Savings Bank, and North Shore Community College. Finding Nemo was presented by Open Door. Next week’s Minions will be shown thanks to Toodeloos!

Read more

Gloucestercast 190 With Donna Soodalter-Toman, Cidalia Schwartz, @SchwEJ, Cat Ryan, @KimSmithDesigns and @Joey_C 7/3/16

GloucesterCastSquareGloucestercast 190 With Donna Soodalter-Toman, Cidalia Schwartz, @SchwEJ, Cat Ryan, @KimSmithDesigns and @Joey_C Taped 7/3/16

podcasticon1

subscribebutton

Topics Include:

Horribles Parade

Donna Soodalter-Toman Opened DIVA Donna’s Infinte Variety Of Adornments- Catwalk Curls Rock Conditioner www.adornmentdiva.com 161 Main Street Gloucester MA+

Stickie Of The Day- Craig’s Video On The New Pasta Making Joint

VIDEO: PASTAIO VIA CORTA

Cidalia Schwartz Bluefin Blowout www.bluefinblowout.com August 4th-6th www.lyonwaugh.com

Wing and Creature Update

Cape Ann Museum Walking Tours

Water Feature At Burnhams Field- Lots of Fun

TJ Ciarametaro New Harbormaster Chad Johnson Named deputy Harbormaster

Harborwalk Movie Night Grease July 13th Wed

Captain Dave Marciano Taking Wounded Vets Out /Yankee Fleet Providing The Boat Destinos Donating Food Mayor Sefathia Giving The Vets Gift Bags

Crazy Animal Attacks

GMG PODCAST copyright Kim Smith

New Harborwalk in Beverly. Salem’s new Remond park honors abolitionists

Read more of Ariana McNeil’s report on Beverly‘s new harborwalk (may include public art), and Dustin Luca writes about Salem’s new Remond Park  (twenty years in the making). Both stories in the Salem News

Beverly

Salem

Today’s Google Doodle has Gloucester Ma connection

120th-anniversary-of-first-modern-olympic-games-google doodle

Today is the first day of track and field at O’Maley Innovation Middle School. On this 120th anniversary of the first day of the modern Olympics (thanks Google Doodle), may our student athletes be inspired by James Brendan Connolly. Before he was a Harvard spurner, a Veteran, a Gloucester Master Mariner, a sea tales chronicler and beloved writer,  James Connolly was one of 14 American athletes (5 were Bostonians) to compete in the international Games of the I Olympiad in Athens, Greece, 1896.Twenty percent of the international competitors were from the United States.

Connolly medalled. Twice. On the first final of the opening day, Connolly won what is now the triple jump and came in 2nd in the high jump. He sailed home a champion, the first Olympic medal winner in 1500 years. This recognition no doubt helped his byline and he rapidly gained a reputation as a fantastic writer. The Boston Globe published his first war correspondence, “Letters from the Front in Cuba” where he served with the Irish 9th Infantry of Massachusetts. His career soars after writing about Gloucestermen from his days working in Gloucester. I’ll let Connolly take it from here, it’s so good:

Read more

BREAKING NEWS: Harvest Moon Music Fest Tix On Sale NOW!

We’ve just put tickets on sale for the Harvest Moon Music Festival benefit to help save Addison Gilbert Hospital.

Five years after Celebrate Gloucester, top north-shore musicians once again take the stage at Gloucester’s award-winning HarborWalk for an extraordinary day of music, food and family fun to help the Addison Gilbert Hospital Citizens Fund save our local hospital.

This is an all-ages festival with plenty of food, an artisan marketplace and a beer and spirits tent for people over 21.

North Shore Curtain Up host Aurelia Nelson will MC the show.

Dance, eat, drink, party and feel good about it because you’re contributing to a great cause.

Get your tickets right now, right here!

FLEDGLING HOMIE RESCUE UNDERWAY AT SEVEN SEAS WHALE WATCH (EDITED)

UPDATE: HOMIE LEARNED TO FLY!

Seagull fledgling ©Kim Smith 2015Heather Dagle from 7 Seas Whale Watch reports that this sweet fledgling appeared several days ago after its nest, which was located at Fisherman’s Wharf, was destroyed in a recent storm. He/she has yet to learn how to fly however, its Mom stops by daily to feed it regurgitated food. After seeing how much the fledgling enjoyed splashing around in a bowl of water placed there by Heather and Kate, I dropped off a big galvanized tub. Heather promises to send a picture if he jumps in!

7-seas-whale-watch-51d2377354b9720f71005f0b

Did you know that 7 Seas Whale Watch was voted best Boston’s Best Whale Watching company by WGBH-Boston Reader’s Poll? Check out their website Here.

3c11236

gray-seal-3Gray Seal Eating a Striper

All images except fledgling gull courtesy Google image search.

Thank You Lynn Bird, Catherine Ryan, Charles, and George

For giving up another Sunday morning to help at the HarborWalk. I am so thankful for your continued help, especially this spring with our daughter’s upcoming wedding. You are doing a tremendous job. I just can’t express how greatly appreciated is your time, energy, hard work, and thoughtfulness. Thank you also to Lise Breen, Amy Kerr, Leslie Heffron, and Beth Chiancola for your help many Sunday mornings this spring.

Through working on the HarborWalk I have met some of the nicest and most kind hearted people one could ever hope to meet. If you would like to lend a hand and come work with the amazing Friends of the HarborWalk, email me at kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com.Charles and George King ©Kim Smith 2015

Today we planted patches of butterfly, bee, and songbird attracting annuals. I am so proud of the job George and Charles accomplished–64 plants all on their own!

 

WOW! What a Team ~ Thank You Friends of the HarborWalk Volunteers!

My best #GloucesterMA HarborWalk Helpers Charles and George!

A post shared by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Thank you Lynn Bird, Amy Kerr, Catherine Ryan, Charles and George for an awesome and fabulous job! We spent the morning weeding and getting the HarborWalk beds ready to plant butterfly attracting annuals. Lynn, Amy, and Catherine are just amazingly helpful and super hard workers. With special thanks to Charles and George for their enthusiasm and wonderfully positive attitude. The boys pitch right in and just really attack the worst of the oversized weeds–we especially enjoyed the funny names they’ve assigned the most offensive weeds, names such as tidy whities!

Gloucester HarborWalk volunteers ©Kim Smith 2015

Gloucester HarborWalk Volunteers Lynn Bird, Amy Kerr, Catherine Ryan, George, and Charles

Pollinator Gardening Tip: Deadheading

Tufted titmouse Baeolophus bicolor ©Kim Smith 2014Tufted titmouse ~ Baeolophus bicolor

In my garden design practice, the topic of deadheading flowers comes up often, especially at this time of year. The habitat garden is designed for people and for pollinators and the objective is to find a balance between the two. Esthetically speaking, to some, a garden only looks its best when every plant is tidily trimmed and every spent flower blossom removed. But to a hungry bird on the wing, an expiring sunflower or cosmos is bird food. Some plants should be deadheaded and pruned however, the next time you get a jones to neaten a plant, take a moment to look at it from the perspective of a songbird.

Black-capped Chicakdee Poecile articapillus ©Kim Smith 2014

Black-capped Chicakdee ~  Poecile articapillus

I like a bit of unruliness in the garden and don’t even deadhead cosmos any longer. They will continue to flower whether deadheaded or not. A few weeks ago while working with several of our wonderful HarborWalk volunteers, I was explaining what plants to deadhead and what plants not to deadhead, and why, when at the very moment that I was speaking those very words, three brilliant cadmium yellow goldfinches flew on the scene and began devouring the seed heads of a nearby coneflower!

American Goldfinch male Cosmos bipinatus ©Kim Smith 2014

American Goldfinch Eating Cosmos Seeds

And too, a batch of Echinacea not only provides mid-winter sustenance to hungry birds, the seed heads sure look pretty silhouetted by new fallen snow.

Coneflowers in the snow ©Kim Smith 2012Gloucester HarborWalk

Best Places to Photograph Butterflies

Monarch Butterfly Gloucester HarborWalk ©Kim Smith 2014

Monarch Butterfly Nectaring at the Gloucester HarborWalk

Reader Gia Vento writes the following:

“Dear Kim,
I met you at the Stoneham Garden Club two years ago.
I’d like to take butterfly photos for my own collection.
Is it too late in the year to do so outdoors?
Can you recommend a good outdoor place where I could capture some images–especially monarchs, other butterflies, ladybugs, and hummingbirds?
I appreciate your time.”
Gia Vento”

My response:

I recall our meeting and so good to hear from you Gia. No, its not too late. Many species of butterflies are on the wing during the late summer and early autumn months, as long as the warm weather holds up. Hopefully, too, the monarch migration will be more successful this year than last. I find the best time of day to see the most species of butterflies is from about 10:30 to about 3ish (generally the warmest and sunniest hours of the day).

The Massachusetts Butterfly Club offers a great publication, The Massachusetts Butterfly Club Guide to Good Butterfly Sites. Several of the best places featured are right here on Cape Ann! Follow this link to purchase the guide from their site (scroll down the webpage about half way): Massachusetts Butterfly Club Guide to Good Butterfly Sites

Happy Photographing!

Warmest wishes,

Kim
guide-cover

American Lady Butterfly New York Ironweed ©Kim Smith 2014

Painted Lady Butterfly Nectaring at New York Ironweed, Gloucester HarborWalk

« Older Entries