Tag Archives: Gloucester Daily Times

Stars Wars Rogue One under the stars | next up HarborWalk Summer Cinema

What it’s like as the crowd fills in on Gloucester’s FREE Wednesday night movies — before the start of last week’s Moana, 8pm

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in case you missed the Gloucester Daily Times “TALK OF THE TIMES”

Outdoor movie nights

Gloucester’s waterfront I-4, C-2 property — still used primarily as a downtown parking lot — returned to its added summer role as an outdoor movie venue this week, when hundreds of parents and children flocked to a free showing of Disney’s 2016 film “Moana” to open the fourth annual HarborWalk Summer Cinema series.

The free Wednesday night movies, a cooperative effort between the city and Rob Newton’s Cape Ann Cinema and Stage, begin at dusk, and will run through Aug. 23 when the original “Jaws,” released in 1975, will be shown. “Jaws” was to open the series on July 12, but the showing was postponed because of rain and thunderstorm warnings.

Christopher Sicuranza, the city’s director of constituent services, said the series continues to gain in popularity.

“It just seems to keep growing year after year,” he said, “and we’re getting more and more calls from outside the city, too. As much as people can watch these films on their iPads or at home, there’s nothing like getting out for these at such a community event — and that’s what these have become.”

Sicuranza, an admitted and unabashed “Star Wars geek,” said he’s especially looking forward to next week’s showing of 2016’s “Rogue One.”

The rest of the schedule calls for the “Lego Batman Movie” on Aug. 2, “The Princess Bride” on Aug. 9, and “Sing!” on Aug. 16.

Long Beach shifting sands and seawall: Rockport DPW targets nature and infrastructure

The other Singing Beach

As with Manchester Singing and other North Shore beaches, the white or “dry”  sand of Long Beach sings a musical sound as you scuff ahead. Lately though it’s whistling a shorter tune because there’s an astonishing loss of the dry grains.

Over the last 10 years,  so much sand has been washed away from Long Beach most every high tide hits the seawall. Boogie boarders need to truncate their wave rides else risk landing on the rip-rap.  It’s become a competitive sport to lay claim to some beach chair and towel real estate if you want a dry seat. On the plus side, low tide is great for beach soccer and tennis, long walks and runs. Bocce ball has replaced can jam and spikeball as the beach games of summer 2017.

Seasoned locals recall having to ‘trudge  a mile’ across dry sand before hitting wet sand and water. In my research I’ve seen historic visuals that support their claims.

Vista: Entrance from the Gloucester side of Long Beach

Historic photos and contemporary images –from 10 years ago– show a stretch of white sand like this one looking out from the Gloucester side of Long Beach to the Rockport side.

Long Beach

photocard showing the pedestrian walkway prior to the concrete boardwalk. Historic prints from ©Fredrik D. Bodin (1950-2015) show the damage after storm, 1931. See his GMG post and rodeo (ca. 1950)

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After the Storm, Long Beach, 1931   Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin (1950-2015) “Printed from the original 5×7 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #88657-134 (Long Beach looking toward Rockport)”

Fredrik D. Bodin Long Beach

Vista: Facing the Gloucester side of Long Beach

This next vintage postcard flips the view: facing the Gloucester side of Long Beach –looking back to glacial rocks we can match out today, a tide line that shows wet and dry sands, and the monumental Edgecliffe Hotel which welcomed thousands of summer visitors thanks to a hopping casino. The white sand evident in front of  the Edgecliffe bath houses (what is now Cape Ann Motor Inn) has plummeted since a 2012 February storm and vanished it seems, perhaps temporarily, perhaps not. It’s most evident where several feet of sand was cleaved off from the approach to the boardwalk.

EdgeCliffe Hotel and surf Long Beach Gloucester Mass postcard

 

Seasons of sand

I find the annual sand migration on Long Beach a fascinating natural mystery. It’s dramatic every year. Here are photos from this last year: fall (late Sept 2016), winter (December-  sand covers rip-rap), spring (April -after winter storms with alarming loss), and summer (today)

FALL

September 2016

 

WINTER

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SPRING April rip-rap uncovered, exposed. Climbing to the boardwalk is an exciting challenge for two boys I know (when the sand is filled in like the December photo it’s a short drop)

April Long Beach

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SUMMER July 14 sand is coming back though all boulders are not entirely submerged

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Storms (namely February) strip the silky soft top sand away and expose the boulders strengthening the seawall. It’s easy to feel alarmed that the beach is disappearing. By summer, the sand fills back, though not always in the same spot or same quantity. Some rip-rap expanses remain exposed. Most is re-buried beneath feet of returning sand. New summer landmarks are revealed. One year it was a ribbon of nuisance pebbles the entire length of beach. The past two years we’ve loved “the August Shelf”. (Will it come again?)

This year there’s a wishbone river.

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“Apparently you do bring sand to the beach, according to the selectmen appointed committee ascribed with repairing the Long Beach seawall, which could cost up to $25 million.” 

In case you missed the Gloucester Daily Times article “Rockport Looks to Fix Long Beach Sea Wall” by Mary Markos, I’ve added the link here. They hope to finish by 2025. I look forward to learning more and reading about it. If extra sand is brought back will high tide continue to hit the seawall? (In the past it could hit the wall or blast over in storms, but dry sand remained lining the wall.) Will the new wall occupy the same general footprint? Will it be higher? Thicker?

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O’Maley Academy benefit Thursday May 4th: dine and enjoy the Drama Club’s medley of Broadway music and theater!

Mike Springer photograph for Gloucester Daily Times “Olivia Heasley rehearses a scene in “Be Our Guest” a musical revue at O’Maley Middle School…Dinner and drama: Performance meal to benefit  O’Maley Academy 18 (after school) clubs” 

  • Tickets: $10 adults, $5 kids and seniors, $20 per family, includes dinner and medley of Broadway musicals and drama
  • Date: Thursday May 4, 2017
  • Time: 6PM
  • Where: O’Maley
  • O’Maley Drama Club O’Maley Academy

 

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In the news: Congratulations Kurt Lichtenwald for leading Gloucester High School robotics and engineering program and students to another recognition–this one national! And those smart Monnells…

Well deserved. See wonderful story by Ray Lamont in today’s Gloucester Daily Times: GHS Engineering program wins national award, Photo by Mike Springer shows Kurt with students Austin Monnell and Conor Williamson.

NATIONAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE FROM THE INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION  

TEACHER EXCELLENCE AWARD 

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It’s close to Kurt’s 20th anniversary at Gloucester High School. Here’s a throwback photo I took in February 2012 at East Gloucester Elementary. Kurt brought the high school students in to the elementary school to lead science and robotic stations for all the kids. He told me then about his approach:

“For too long; students who could memorize facts were considered highly intelligent. In my classes students must learn to apply the knowledge and prove that they learned the topics. This is a different kind of intelligence (kinesthetic – hands on intelligence)  that for so long has gone unappreciated and unrecognized.  Mixing the two types of intelligences (multi level) in a class just makes common sense and great products (student work).”-Kurt Lichtenwald

 

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Walk this way: Gloucester’s stately Stacy Boulevard public works project is breathtaking and one for the ages! Part 1

This view will be changing imminently! Today’s Motif Monday is the work on the Boulevard.

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The marvelous engineering and construction for the boulevard is a HUGE story. In all the collective excitement to walk this way, let’s remember to take a moment to acknowledge this feat.

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Mike Hale, Gloucester’s Director of Public Services, was hired in July of 1999, the very same year that this ambitious boulevard infrastructure planning and funding search began for this project. It was funded in 2014.  That means the current project timeline spanned 4 Mayors, administration, staff and city councils. The construction has been exceptionally well managed and I predict it will be or should be nationally recognized with awards. I have been documenting the progress and in the coming days will post several tributes, contemporary views, historic photos and background to rev up anticipation and respect.

Coincidentally, April 16, 2017 will mark the 94th anniversary of an important piece of the boulevard’s construction.

On that day in history, Gloucester’s city council approved the purchase of two lots, the Grant and Low properties:

“Whereas it is the desire of the board of park commissioners of the city of Gloucester to take in fee by purchase or otherwise certain land in said Gloucester lying between Western Avenue and the sea,

“And whereas, the said board has estimated the expenses of acquiring the same to be $8000,

“It is hereby ordered that the sum of $8000 be and hereby is appropriated from the $90,000 Western Avenue act of 1922 to the board of park commissioners as provided by law for the purpose of acquiring and laying out as a public park such land as the said board of park commissioners consider desirable therefore, being the land as shown on a plan entitled ‘Proposed taking for highway and park purposes, Gloucester, Mass, dated April 16, 1923, John H. Griffin, City Engineer,’ having reference to that portion as shown on said plan as is proposed to be taken for park purposes.” I’ve added the bold emphasis to note the big vision of Western Avenue as a public park and extension of Stage Fort in 1923.

The significant original investment was tangible and long lasting, hallmarks of any successful public works project. Did the Boulevard improve the quality of life in Gloucester? It wasn’t easy. Houses and roads were moved.

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Photo caption: “A VIEW NOW OF THE PAST. Most of us are familiar with the Above View. it Shows the Dwellings which Once Lined the Western Avenue Waterfront Before Work was Started Constructing the New Boulevard.”

These photographs were published in August 1923 and retrieved from the Gloucester Daily Times microfiche reel at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library.

The caption below describes Kent Circle “where grand stand has been erected for the review of the parades” for Gloucester’s tercentenary celebration. 

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Awaiting full access in 2017 is a mere blip of an inconvenience when considering how fundamental the Boulevard is for Gloucester. Its benefits are priceless.

Tomorrow’s post BRINGING PLANS TO LIFE

Prior posts

LETTER TO THE TIMES: CATHERINE RYAN ROCKS!!

We’re sharing this lovely letter about GMG’s own Catherine Ryan, which was sent to the the Gloucester Daily Times, and written by Pauline Bresnahan.

To the editor:

The year 2013 was the first year I was asked to be on the city of Gloucester’s Tourism Commission. I have met many people who love the city and want to use their area of knowledge to help our community.

It was then that I met and started working alongside my now dear friend Catherine Ryan. I am constantly in awe of her dedication to her family and her love of Gloucester and Cape Ann.

Some of the wonderful projects that she has in some way positively impacted and in many cases quietly but with great passion championed are: Gloucester’s Harborwalk, the Downtown Cultural District, Committee for the Arts, the Tourism Commission, the Pop Up Art event at The Hive for Young Artists, Cape Ann Reads and murals at City Hall. She has also helped to guide her sons in their desire to preserve and display the Bachelor Civil War coat at Gloucester High School.

It is a great privilege and honor to be able to call Catherine a friend but even more to let her know that I cannot thank her enough for what she does for us here in Gloucester. I have amazing respect for this amazing woman and I wanted to just let her know that.

If you know Catherine, you also know she is a humble woman who never asks for recognition but will be the first to recognize others for their work. You will often see her posts on Good Morning Gloucester. She is always sharing the work of others in the city and helping to promote events. Catherine does not hesitate to help a young person who might need some help or advice. Her ability to research stories and share factual information for the readers of the blog are extremely useful.

If you know Catherine let her know how much you appreciate what she does for all of us. I know I will.

Pauline Bresnahan

Chairwoman, Gloucester Tourism Commission

SUSPECT ARRESTED IN PAPRIKA GRILL ARMED ROBBERY

By Ray Lamont

George Doherty told Gloucester police Tuesday morning that his alleged crime the night of Feb. 20 was a “spur of the moment” action.

He said he had left the home of a female friend on Veterans Way after finding a bottle of Xanax on the ground, drinking heavily, and arguing with her, he told police.

He walked down Washington Street, then stopped to sit for a moment at Oak Grove Cemetery. But he began experiencing withdrawal from drugs and alcohol, he said, and realized he was desperate for money.

It was then he decided to burst into the nearby Paprika Grill, brandishing a knife and demanding cash from the owner and an employee while covering his face with a jersey he had been wearing.

Doherty, 26, of 16 Columbia St., Apt. 1, is being held on charges of armed and masked robbery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and larceny of more than $250 for robbing the eatery at 8 the night of the Presidents Day holiday.

Doherty was arrested Tuesday and arraigned in the afternoon in Gloucester District Court, where Judge Joseph Jennings III granted assistant district attorney Aimee Conway’s calls for no bail and a dangerousness hearing. The judge set the hearing for Tuesday, March 14, again in Gloucester District Court.

A conviction for armed robbery without the use of a gun can bring a sentence of up to 10 years in state prison.

READ COMPLETE STORY WITH PHOTO OF THE SUSPECT HERE

DMV RMV at Gloucester Crossing Part 2: Legislators Urge Decision on new site for Registry

img_20170203_093649The decision on the location for a new North Shore DMV registry branch remains undecided.  There are service centers on the other peninsula, Cape Cod. Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard host full DMV service centers as do towns with smaller populations, like Greenfield and North Adams. There isn’t a uniform state model.

The day after the GMG post musing What about a DMV branch at Gloucester Crossing?, Paul Leighton wrote an article in yesterday’s Gloucester Daily Times “Legislators urge decision on new site for Registry” Thursday February 2, 2017 with more info.

According to the article: “Six property owners submitted bids in October. A spokesman for the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance, which oversees state leasing, said those bids are still being reviewed…In addition to Speliotis, local legislators who signed the letter to the state included state Sen. Joan Lovely of Salem and state Reps. Paul Tucker of Salem, Tom Walsh of Peabody, Jerry Parisella of Beverly, Lori Ehrlich of Marblehead and Brad Hill of Ipswich, who represents Manchester.”

Leighton’s prior Gloucester Daily Times article about the DMV branch location “Registry considers Peabody, Beverly sites for new branch” was published July 21, 2016.

New Libraries of Massachusetts MBLC poster includes preservation examples and combos. Zoom in!

Direct and zoomable link to the “New Libraries of Massachusetts” excellent poster (PDF), created by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC) and covering projects completed up to 2012. Many are historic combos and a few bypass parking compliance (Boston Public Library).

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Late last night, Ray Lamont filed a story for the Gloucester Daily Times about January 11 library building meeting.

gdt-headline-jpgI’ll add links to the Q&A from last week and last night  if they’re available. Identifying an architect of the preliminary plans and building architect are part of filing intent. And the FAQ spells out: Eligibility: …Applicants must have local approval to apply for, accept, and expend grant funds as well as approval for the proposed preliminary design. 

See more information about the Massachusetts Public Library Building Program in the video they produced, and Sawyer Free showed last week at the corporators meeting.

 

 

Sawyer Free at a crossroads: building plan meetings tomorrow January 11 at 4:00pm and 6:30pm

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Sawyer Free Building Committee is meeting at 4pm January 11, 2017 to discuss schematic design, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC grant opportunities), and ready another presentation. At 6:30pm they’ll give a second public presentation with the building team. (Today’s Gloucester Daily Times article by Ray Lamont has more information: Commish Questions: Library board presenting proposal at community forum Wednesday night) Below are photographs from the January 4th meeting for coporators and other invited guests. The library’s building committee and the new building team gave a presentation and fielded comments and questions. Attendees expressed both support and dismay. Like the schools, it’s a big topic.  There are similarities: seeking a matching state grant, steep building compliance requirements, same project manager as West Parish and architects as West Parish. Questions and concerns can be directed to a communications consultant engaged by the library who will help to connect you with answers. There was a scrumptious catering spread from Willow Rest. I liked the artisan flatbread school of fish display. Melissa and the Willow Rest team are so creative.

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The current North Shore Magazine gives a shout out to Beverly Library for being rather library-ish, “unlike a lot of libraries, it’s quiet.” Plus more interior photographs of the Boston Public Library.

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Boston Public Library passing through Daniel Chester French doors

 

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Longfellow among the 30 Boston notable mosaics

 

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Louis Saint-Gaudens twin lions, honoring Civil War veterans; grand stairs, ceiling, windows, partial peek at Puves de Chavennes murals

Balancing and balance

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Prior post: Proposed building plans. Plus universal access, consolidated archives and digitization

Are you going to be awake @ midnight 2017?

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James Montgomery Kicks 2016 outa here!

For us NYE is different every year.  Some years we struggle to stay awake.  Other years we’re in party mode. Like many of you, we’re eager to see 2016 gone and welcome 2017 in the most fun way possible, so we’re in PARTY MODE.

If you’re in party mode too, there’s lots to do (see here) — and all night long, meaning you don’t necessarily have to choose — YOU CAN DO IT ALL!  You could go to an early show that’s over by 9:30 and then bop down the road to Beverly’s Vittori-Rocci Hall and help blues legend James Montgomery KICK 2016 out and rock in 2017.  That’s where we’ll be.

Check out this story in the Gloucester Daily Times for a preview of what to expect.  In James’ own words, “It’s going to be a powerful show.”

Just in case you forgot what a true rock star he is, here’s a video of James Montgomery with the Allman Brothers Band about 4 years ago.

 

Cape Ann Reads picture book contest: local artist John Bassett steps up to volunteer

Reminder in the today’s Gloucester Daily Times that the Cape Ann Reads deadline to register for the original children’s picture book contest is two weeks around the corner– November 15th. The deadline for the book submissions by registered applicants is December 15.

Thank you to Rockport glass sculptor, John Bassett, www.basglas.com

for responding to the GMG post last week calling for   Volunteer artists and illustrators to assist local writers with their book submissions! There are three or four writers hoping to find a match. John made the generous offer of use of his images for a book applicant, plus the possibility of creating new work in response to their book. If you or an artist you know would like to volunteer please email capeannreads2016@gmail.com.

It’s easy to register for the Cape Ann creates for Cape Ann Reads children’s picture book contest

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Two weeks until Cape Ann Reads registration deadline (see the Desi Smith photo of Cape Ann Savings Bank ‘free shred day’)

 

3 more days for the Mayor’s Arts Challenge

Reminder about the Massachusetts Cultural Council 2016 Mayor’s Arts Challenge in the Gloucester Daily Times Talk of the Times by All Hands On Deck  (love that)

You can use your smartphone to watch it on the YouTube channel–you know you’re there when you can see the ‘thumb’s-up’ icon beneath the video window.

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Scary stories-scenes from City Council & School Committee Consolidation meeting

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See GMG for prior school consolidation meetings (with links)

Cape Ann TV link to the video (coming soon)

Building Management that works with MSBA

Samantha Verga’s Facebook Group (250+ and growing): Advocates for the Future of Gloucester Public Schools

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Ray Lamont’s Gloucester Daily Times article about the meeting

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How to save for Topsfield Fair: buy discounted ride tickets, don’t forget your kids’ Library Read & Win rewards, note active military and senior discounts

 

FREE admission for all active military on Tuesday October 4th, 2016.

Senior Citizens discounted entry on Monday October 3rd, 2016.

You can purchase advance discounted tickets from Topsfield Fair on line or at the fairgrounds. Ace Hardware in Gloucester has discounted admission and ride tickets for sale. Discounted admission tickets are also for sale at the Gloucester Daily TimesAnd Groupon.  Thank you Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library for participating in the Topsfield Fair Read&Win summer reading prize packet incentive which contains free entry, 2 rides and 1 yummy meal!

The 2016 Topsfield fair opens September 30th and closes October 10. Discounted ticket sales are limited and stop September 26.

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Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library one of many that partners with Topsfield Fair Read & Win — great kids reward packet for their summer reading

 

Bravo! Gloucester Stages’s YAW in the news- winter spring summer or fall the best kids acting classes around

Congratulations! Marvelous Heidi Dallin and crew really deserve this praise! 20160812_152926

LEARNING FROM AN OSCAR NOMINEE- Lindsay Crouse’s visit was on the front page of the Gloucester TimesWendy Waring’s visit was also on the front page of the Gloucester Times and in the Boston Sunday Globe!

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Litter! Drugs! 1978 at the Quarries

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Did you read Ray Lamont’s article  Crackdown at the Quarries from Gloucester Daily Times? That is now and that was then. A few choice excerpts from an August 5, 1978 article by  Henry F Billings published in the North Shore Magazine insert of the Gloucester Daily Times.

The water is oil-slicked in places and the litter is out of control everywhere. There is obviously no one responsible for cleaning up the area. Apparently the people who use the area are making no effort to tidy up.

The litter ranges from beer bottles of now defunct breweries to yesterday’s Big Mac container to last Saturday night’s underwear. Careful collection of all the broken glass in the area would provide all the churches of the United States with enough material to make their own stained glass windows for the next millennium.

The persistent will not be deterred by this eyesore. they will follow the path that leads around to the left.

A  few steps beyond the first quarry is a second, much cleaner, one. Although there still is enough litter to keep a DPW crew busy for a week, this quarry does offer the bather a salubrious haven from the burdens of the world. 

Nude bathing adds a dash of spice to an already adventurous day of swimming…

And, if your sense of smell is weak then the acid rock punctuating the air is a dead giveaway. The message is clear: “come on , he’s got cocaine and morphine too…rocketships to get you high…

The first quarry is particularly renown as an automobile burial ground. No doubt a ‘stolen car’ or two has found its way to the murky depths. That would help account for the thick, localized oil slicks which are the legacy of a quick insurance claim. This explanation is given additional credence by a bit of graffiti on a cliff at the second quarry, “Park Cars Here” with an arrow pointing down. One of the stranger stories is the one about a man who dove from a high cliff only to be skewered by a car antenna. This improbable tale has produced an additional piece of graffiti, “Dean Man’s Cliff.” All of this lends an air of fascination to the place.

So if you can shield your eyes from the thoughtless refuse of others and are a strong adventurous swimmer with a disdain for crowds, then maybe a day at the Annisquam quarry is for you…

When a region as popular and crowded as the North Shore is during the summer, it may seem strange to talk of obscure swimming areas. In truth, there aren’t many left.

And those that we have are manifestly flawed. If you want guaranteed safety, clean water and privies with toilet paper, then you better stay with established areas…

photo caption: Quarries were not designed with swimming safety in mind

Castle Manor Inn Cape Ann Chamber Small Business of the year Awards

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Nice annual event. Gorgeous day at the Inn.

Congratulations Gloucester’s Mark Nestor. Last year it was GMG  Joey Ciaramitaro, “longtime co proprietor of Captain Joe and Sons Lobster Company in Gloucester and the creator and driving force behind the blog GoodMorningGloucester.”

read more about the four 2016 winners from the Gloucester Daily Times article:

http://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/local_news/chamber-s-business-champions-feted/article_331eced5-c418-50d3-b650-4ef740712b44.html

 

Boston Globe complimenting Gloucester’s gorgeous WPA era murals

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Did you see? Wonderful John McElhenny’s My View article to the Gloucester Daily Times thanking great work by the CPA committee and residents? And more this week in the Boston Globe? Nice to be the successful model. “In Gloucester, residents have leveraged funding for 80 units of affordable elderly housing in an old grammar school, replaced historic lead glass windows at the Cape Ann Museum, and restored Depression-era WPA murals at City Hall.”  Read more of the Boston Globe article here

Since April is National Poetry month it seems extra fitting to pause on the Charles Allan Winter mural–which by the way is notoriously difficult to photograph in that site. Nice job by photographer Pat Greenhouse / Boston Globe.

In 1931, he and his wife Alice Beach Winter, also a successful artist, came to live in Gloucester year round having spent summers since 1914 and building their Mt. Pleasant studio  in 1922.  Poetry was the third mural Winter completed in Gloucester.

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