Tag Archives: Fitz Henry Lane

Great crowd for Quentin Callewaert & Safety Gloucester Harbor Loop concert

Different musicians every Thursday, 6-9PM sponsored by Pratty’s, Go Spring Water, Seacoast, Rhumb Line, Noble Electric and Maplewood Car Wash 

These photos are scenes from the Quentin Callewaert & Safety concert August 3, 2017.

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Maritime Gloucester’s aquarium sign mural looks good!

 

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August 3 2017 Thursday nights Harbor Loop summer concert series Gloucester MA

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Join American Craft Week Oct 6-15 | Gloucester made the USA Top 10 list and you should be in the guide!

Here’s a super easy and great opportunity to share what you do or help your friend’s work get noticed.  Crafters, artisans, makers, retailers, creatives: make sure to sign up before July 1, 2017 when it’s just $25.

Please share. Also, please encourage any under 30 Gloucester to showcase their work. Perhaps they’ll be designated next year’s ‘rising stars’. Participants & Events :: American Craft Week :: HOW TO JOIN  and check out their resource page- “PR power packet page”

Here’s why Gloucester won

gloucester is top 10 town in USA for craft lovers winner 2017

It’s tough to match Gloucester for the range and depth of fall art fairs and events –including American Craft Week– and Gloucester’s heritage of artists and artisans of yesterday and today (more on the pioneers below.) Pauline Bresnahan participates and drummed up the vote: “Gloucester has always encouraged creativity, individuality and artistic expression. Honored to be able to participate and encourage others to take part in this celebration for everyone who has fallen in love with their art and craft that shows their creativity.”

October is BEAUTIFUL!

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I’ve gathered special events and festivals that run annually each October/Fall in Gloucester and on Cape Ann.  Make sure to look into the monthly art gallery exhibitions, live music, performances, and readings going on in the many art and culture venues as well as non-traditional spaces, businesses, organizations, accommodations, and restaurants. Mind you this is only the fall (October!) listings:

Just in October

Founded in 2016-  Cape Ann Plein Air Note that Paint Essex annual Plein Air  (founded in 2012) moved from a summer slot to the fall to coincide with Cape Ann Plein Air in 2016

Founded in 2016- Look for Magnolia Sip and Stroll nights –  “Enjoy complimentary food, beverages and live music while visiting the wonderful shops on historic Lexington Avenue in Magnolia, MA”

Founded in 2015- Brace Cove 2nd Annual Art Market (one day only!) 1pm till dark.

Founded in – Oktoberfest at Cape Ann Brewing Company

Founded in 2010 /in Gloucester 2014 – Annual American Craft Week held in October Gloucester recognized as one of America’s top 10 towns for craft lovers | 2017 Annual American Craft Week October 6-15  Last year Pauline’s Gifts and Cape Ann Artisans participated. I think we can increase that list a bit! 

Founded in 2015 – Pumpkin Carving at Cape Ann Art Haven

Founded in 2012- Fall Fest at Mile Marker 1 by Bridge Cape Ann

Founded in 2009- the Annual DoctoberFest Documentary Film Festival curated by Cape Ann Cinema & Stage (estab.2008)

Founded in 2006- Cape Ann Farmers Market outdoor market Thursdays into October, also features artisans and makers.

Founded in 1984- Annisquam Arts & Crafts show Oct 8 & Oct 9, 10-5

Founded in 1984-  Annual Art Auction, Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library

Founded in 1983-  Cape Ann Artisans Studio Tour (the oldest continuous in the country) featured as part of Artweek Boston 2016

Founded in 1979- Gloucester Stage is world class professional American theater in our country’s oldest seaport. Look for fall Premiers

Founded in 1972- Annual Essex Clamfest October

VENERABLE ARTS  TRADITION

Start with a visit to Cape Ann Museum a world class American art museum with a not to miss fine art and archive collections founded in 1873. Just Go! Outsider art and fine craft maker high lights include Folly Cove designers repository,  1893 Columbian Exposition Chicago World’s Fair harbor diorama, Fiesta oars, and the Community of Neighborhoods quilt cycle.

In each and every decade, printed ephemera and guides capture Gloucester’s long proud cultural history. Guides matter. Here are a couple of pioneer examples with a craft emphasis from the 1960s and 1892. American Craft Week is the digital equivalent of a who’s who in the American craft scene.

1960s

“We are told in the print that the American public is hungry for art…untouched by the machine. Cape Ann craft workers can satisfy that hunger…given a chance.” Henry Bollman, 1961

Bollman a ceramicist volunteered to chair the crafts section VIII of the 10th annual Gloucester Arts Festival: Ruth Balch, leather sandals; Henry Bollman, ceramics; Harriet Curtis, weaving and trays; Doris Frankbonner, ceramics and jewelry; Folly Cove Designers, Block Printing; Heather Godfrey, furniture decoration; Max Kuhne, silver leaf; Morris Lubin, Metal work; Reina Martin, silver and gold; Robert Natti, Pottery; Ruth Powers, Rugs

1961 Gloucester MA artisans

1960 list craft exhibition: John Black (silk screen); Henry Bollman (Ceramics); Greg Burke (Mosaics); Doris Coleman (Rockport Beach Glass jewelry); Edward Coleman (Rockport Beach glass jewelry); Carol Creed (mosaics); Alfred Czerepak (wood sculpture); Otis Dana (old pine furniture); Preston Donn (stained glass); Anne Daukas (woodwork); Folly cove designers (printed fabrics); Hazel Gaudreau (pottery); Heather Godfrey (hand painted trays and furniture); Thelma Karr (fabric designing); Evelyn Krames (enameling); Sol Krames (enameling); Max Kuehne (silver leaf); Gene Lesch (pewter and soft metals); Moris Lubin (art metal work); Ada Maker (ceramic coffee table); Barbara Marshall (cabinetmaker); Reino Martin (gold and silversmith); Sandra Matheson (cermaics)

1960 craft exhibition

Detail from one of the maps indicating the “General location of artists residing in same place permanently or each summer.” This one shows Gloucester Bay View, Lanesville, Folly Cove area mainly painters and sculptors among them: Paul Manship, Walker Hancock, Leon Kroll, George Demetrios, Virginia Lee Burton, Folly Cove Designers

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The Gloucester Arts Festival scheduled ancillary programming like Cape Ann Festival of the Arts guided hikes and arts and writing exhibitions and contests for Gloucester’s youth.

1892

The Art and Loan Exhibition for The Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town of Gloucester held August 24-29   featured “a representation collection of the antique and artistic from the many homes on Cape Ann…In connection with the exhibit a souvenir silver scarf pin was sold representing a fishing schooner under full rig with the dates 1642-1892 in raised work, and found ready purchasers…A piece of room paper from the walls of the old Ellery House, the first wall paper used in Gloucester, is exhibited…an interesting bit of fancy work is a frame inscribed in letters worked in silk Hannah Masters her Sampler May 8 1768…Another piece of family work which shows evidence of much labor and painstaking is a Clark family tree worked in silk on canvas in 1832 by Mary B. Clark, mother of Mayor Andrews…” The loan and art committee were reimbursed  $1195.81; the souvenir pins inventory was $211.40. Thankfully the city published a “true and detailed account of the 250th anniversary observance and illustrated these Lane and Beach works. The 1817 view of Gloucester by Capt Beach was loaned by Asa G. Andrews, too. JB Foster was the one and only artist on the extensive exhibition checklist (321 detailed items) that listed his work for sale $100 “At the Wharf Gloucester Harbor”. James Pringle wrote the seminal digitized “History of the town and city of Gloucester, Cape Ann, Massachusetts” 1892.

1892 art and loan on exhibit for Gloucester MA 250th

American Craft Week

Lane and the Crane

Fitz Henry Lane house, Harbor Loop, Gloucester, MA. For more information on Lane visit Cape Ann Museum’s amazing digital catalog raisonne   http://www.fitzhenrylaneonline.org or the museum at 27 Pleasant St., Gloucester, MA. Maritime Gloucester discovery museum is just around the loop from the Fitz Henry Lane house. The crane is part of the National Grid remediation work by Solomon Jacobs Park.

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Juni Van Dyke solo exhibition at Jane Deering Gallery: Artist of such expressive power and spirit

Juni Van Dyke’s show at Jane Deering Gallery 19 Pleasant Street Gloucester MA opens Saturday October 29 5-7PM and continues through December 2017. I think Juni’s art transposes her passions and delights into works of sumptuous color and significance. They are beautiful, moving and resonant with her life experiences.

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Jane Deering Gallery is located within the 1842 home built for Capt. Harvey Coffin MacKay and  Sally (Somes) MacKay. They were married in 1816. The building is one of many distinctive assets within Gloucester’s Central Historic District. There aren’t many wood structures dating from this time because of fires.

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McKay’s name is on the 1821 First Fire Club list, established in 1766, appointed to Engine No. Two.  Members agreed to 14 Articles: “to be helpful to each other in case of fire; 2, each member to provide two good leather buckets and two strong bags of not less than three bushels capacity, the fine for non-compliance being 12-1/2 cents; 3, to meet annually, also quarterly, with a fine of 12-1/2 cents for non-attendance; 4, a committee of two to inspect each other’s premises and inspect all fire apparatus quarterly; 5, a moderator and clerk to be elected; 6, prescribe the duties of the clerk; 7, to expel members absent from four quarterly meetings and refusing to pay the fines and assessments; 8, to pay for buckets or bags lost at any fire; 9, each member to pay 50 cents for a printed copy of the articles; 10, a secret watch-word for the society, the fine for divulging the same being 40 cents; 11, a fine of 12-1/2 cents for buckets or bags being out of their proper places; 12, fines and assessments to be paid to the Clerk; 12, a three-fourths vote necessary for admission, etc.; 14, a quarterly assessment of 25 cents to meet ordinary expenses.” See The Gloucester Fire Department: its history and work from 1793 to 1893 by John J Somes, ©1892 

Capt. MacKay was born Joshua Gee Whittemore, Jr; records indicate that on February 13, 1813 he was “allowed to take the name of Harvey C. Mackay,…and be called and known by the said name; and the said name shall forever hereafter be considered as his only proper and legal name, to all intents and purposes.” At one time MacKay was Fitz Henry Lane’s landlord. Fitz Hugh Lane changed his name to Fitz Henry Lane in 1832. You can learn more about Lane at the Cape Ann Museum, right next door to the Jane Deering Gallery. The MacKay house jogged my memory about something else I learned from the Cape Ann Museum in a brief article by Stephanie Buck. In 1879, Sarah Johnson, a MacKay lodger, was the first woman to vote in Gloucester for a public official.  Buck’s article reveals who was second, third and fourth in line!  I thought about that when I peeked through the window at Juni’s show. Here’s a solo exhibition by a woman, at a gallery owned by a woman, next to a museum run by Ronda Faloon, with nearby exhibits featuring other solo shows by women, galleries and businesses owned by women, and Mayor Romeo Theken at City Hall. I hope we can raise money to commission original portraits of Mayor Kirk and Mayor Romeo Theken to add to City Hall.  They are the only Mayors that aren’t represented.

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In 2014, a trunk filled with archival material attributed to Captain MacKay including papers about the ship Parthian fetched $900 (est. $150-200) at online auction site, Invaluable, for The Gallery at Knotty Pine in West Swanzey, NH.

“I, Harvey C. Mackay do solemnly, sincerely, and truly swear, that the within REPORT and LIST, subscribed with my name and now delivered by me to the Collector of the district of BOSTON AND CHARLESTOWN, contains, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the names, age, sex and occupation of all the passengers, together with the name of the country to which they severally belong, and that of which they intend to become inhabitants, which were on board the London Packet whereof I am at present master, at the time of her sailing from the port of London or which have at any time since been taken on board the said vessel. And I do likewise swear, that all matters whatsoever in said report and list expressed, are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, just and true. SO HELP ME GOD. (Signed) Harvey Mackay, MASTER. Sworn to before me, this twenty-fifth day of April 1827, (signed) J. W., Dy. COLLECTOR.” See the (short) Passenger list on board the packet Ship London from England to Boston, Massachusetts on 25 April 1827 

 

A fishing schooner built in Essex in 1866 was named for ‘intrepid Capt Harvey C Mackay (1786-1869). From Out of Gloucester, http://www.downtosea.com: On December 24, 1879: The Sch. ‘Harvey C. Mackay’ Given Up as Lost: The Schooner Harvey C. Mackay, for whose safety fears have been entertained, and for whose coming back to port anxious ears have long been waiting, has been given up as lost by her owners, and she must be added, with her crew of hardy men, to the list of lost fishermen. She left port… 

New Jane Deering Gallery opens in Gloucester

 

piping plovers on Coffins Beach: intertidal mile and they’re holdin’ on.

20160715_143652Gloucester’s Coffins Beach is a long, long stretch of wide open sandy seashore framed by dunes, sea and sky. Growing up, we called it the private side of Wingaersheek. I could hear piping plovers and saw two ‘in the zone’– the intertidal bit that is still wet at low tide and well under water at high tide. I didn’t see birds in the safe retreats by the upper part of the beach, but heard the melodious chirps that inspired their nickname.

Listen to the piping plover

 

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Essex County Greenbelt protective measures in concert with  MA Wildlife

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dog prints by the rope fence

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saw 5 dogs on the beach

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Fitz Hugh Lane, Coffins Beach, MFA

 

Piping plovers have quite a story. In Massachusetts, the vast majority are south, Cape Cod and the islands. By the close of the 19th century, these birds were near extinction. They rebounded successfully by the 1950’s.

I spoke with Dave Rimmer of Essex County Greenbelt, Marion Larson with Ma Wildlife, Deborah Cramer and Chris Leahy. All of them have updates for GMG which I’ll add next. First,

Chris Leahy, MA Audubon, explained that a second age of precipitous piping plover decline occurred in the 1960’s and 70’s. What do you think it was?

Read on to find out.
Read more

Co-Authors of Fitz Henry Lane – Family and Friends

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Sarah Dunlap and Stephanie Buck co-authors of a book about Fitz Henry Lane.   The book can be purchased at the Gloucester Archive department, where Sarah volunteers, and also at the Cape Ann Museum where Stephanie works.

Also available at Amazon (Fitz Lane) 

 

Many thanks to both Sarah and Stephanie for all their help in my own research project.

 

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Guided Walking Tours Offered by Cape Ann Museum

Explore downtown Gloucester through the historic lens of maritime painter Fitz Henry Lane

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (September 11, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Fitz Henry Lane’s Gloucester, a guided walking tour, on Saturday,  September 26 at 10:00 a.m. Explore downtown Gloucester and discover what it was like in the 19th century when Fitz Henry Lane roamed the streets and painted the views. Tours last about one and a half hours and are held rain or shine. Participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. Cost is $10 for Cape Ann Museum members; $20 for nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x10 for more information or to reserve a space.

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Fitz Henry Lane was a Cape Ann artist, printmaker and world-renowned American marine painter. With his subtle use of gleaming light, Lane is generally regarded as one of the finest 19th century practitioners of the style known as luminism. The Cape Ann Museum’s unparalleled collection of works by Fitz Henry Lane – which includes paintings, drawings and lithographs – is on permanent display in the gorgeously renovated Lane Gallery, a space fully devoted to Lane’s life and work.

Image credit: Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865). Gloucester Harbor at Sunrise, c. 1850, oil on canvas. Gift of Lawrence Brooks, 1970. [Acc. #2020]

Explore downtown Gloucester through the historic lens of maritime painter Fitz Henry Lane

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The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Fitz Henry Lane’s Gloucester, a guided walking tour, on Saturday, September 5 at 10:00 a.m. Explore downtown Gloucester and discover what it was like in the 19th century when Fitz Henry Lane roamed the streets and painted the views. Tours last about one and a half hours and are held rain or shine. Participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. Cost is $10 for Cape Ann Museum members; $20 for nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x10 for more information or to reserve a space. This tour will be offered again on September 26.

Fitz Henry Lane was a Cape Ann artist, printmaker and world-renowned American marine painter. With his subtle use of gleaming light, Lane is generally regarded as one of the finest 19th century practitioners of the style known as luminism. The Cape Ann Museum’s unparalleled collection of works by Fitz Henry Lane – which includes paintings, drawings and lithographs – is on permanent display in the gorgeously renovated Lane Gallery, a space fully devoted to Lane’s life and work.

 

Sunset Tours of Gloucester Harbor

Sail away on the Schooner Ardelle to the world of Fitz Henry Lane

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 1, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum, in partnership with Maritime Gloucester, is pleased to offer a narrated tour of Gloucester Harbor aboard the Schooner Ardelle onWednesday, July 15 at 6:00 p.m. The cost for the Fitz Henry Lane Sunset Harbor Cruise is $30 for Museum members; $45 for nonmembers. Space is limited; reservations required. For more information please call (978) 281-0470 or visit maritimegloucester.org. This program will also be offered on August 12.unnamedFitz Henry Lane, Gloucester Harbor at Sunrise, c. 1850. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum.

Sunset Tours of Gloucester Harbor

Sail away on the Schooner Ardelle to the world of Fitz Henry Lane

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (June 4, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum, in partnership with Maritime Gloucester, is pleased to announce three dates for their popular Fitz Henry Lane Sunset Harbor Cruise this summer. The narrated tour of Gloucester Harbor aboard the Schooner Ardelle will be offered on the following Wednesday evenings: June 17, July 15 and August 12. Cost is $30 for Museum members; $45 for nonmembers. Space is limited; reservations required. For more information please call (978) 281-0470 or visit maritimegloucester.org.

Lane-GloucesterHarborSunrise1851Image: Fitz Henry Lane, Gloucester Harbor at Sunrise, c. 1850. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum

The newly renovated Cape Ann Museum celebrates the art, history and culture of Cape Ann – a region with a rich and varied culture of nationally significant historical, industrial and artistic achievement. The Museum’s collections include fine art from the 19th century to the present, artifacts from the fishing & maritime and granite quarrying industries, textiles, furniture, a library/archives, and two historic houses. For a detailed media fact sheet please visit http://www.capeannmuseum.org/press.
The Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10.00 adults, $8.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. For more information please call: (978)283-0455 x10. Additional information can be found online at http://www.capeannmuseum.org.

Cape Ann Museum Annual Meeting

Celebrating the accomplishments of 2014

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (May 8, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum will hold its Annual Meeting on Tuesday, May 19 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Staff reports and Board elections will be followed by Fitz Henry Lane Revealed, a brief discussion of new research based on infrared photography presented by Board member and FHL Online Project Manager, Sam Holdsworth. Refreshments will follow.Annual Mtg

Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865), On the Wharves [detail with infrared photo overlay], 1847. Oil on panel. Gift of Jane Parker Stacy in memory of George O. Stacy, 1948. [1289.1b]

 

Mayor Romeo Thekan Showcasing Fitz Henry Lane During Cape Ann Museum Tour

Re-opening the Cape Ann Museum: From ceramic shards and Lane’s light to more than 1000 prisms

Click below for the video with Cape Ann Museum Director Ronda Faloon

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Catherine Ryan writes-

RE-OPENING THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM with Director RONDA FALOON

Part 3 of 3: From ceramic shards and Lane’s light to more than 1000 prisms

In part 3 of touring the Cape Ann Museum’s recent renovation, Director Ronda Faloon heads upstairs and inspires several portrait shots by Joey Ciaramitaro.

designLAB Architects were tasked with orchestrating four projects for this Cape Ann Museum 2013-14 renovation. The museum required interior repairs and updates for older parts of the building “studs in” such as electrical, plumbing, fire and security systems. There was some necessary upkeep and care of fifty year old surfaces. Underutilized spaces were re-configured. Lastly, the renovation provided an opportunity to reinstall the permanent collection. Prior to this renovation, one of the museum’s last building projects was the Graham Gund master plan, a dramatic facility expansion and redesign begun in 1990 and completed in multi-stages so the museum could remain open.

It’s not easy to temporarily close a Cape Ann mainstay. In order to continue to encourage such a superb experience and repeat visitation, the Cape Ann Museum has continually improved. The museum has been in existence since the 1870s. The various buildings, architects and additions are part of its history and success in sharing the arts and culture of Cape Ann.

When the museum re-opens in August 2014 , as visitors ascend the familiar Graham Gund staircase to the second floor (or elevator—Cape Ann Museum is fully accessible), they’ll encounter a new gallery space custom designed for the massive and rare first order Fresnel Lens, one of 39 remaining in the United States. French physicist Augustine-Jean Fresnel designed these lens in the early 1820s. This one was manufactured in Paris, France, and installed on Thatcher Island in 1861. The lens is remarkable for the science and history and is just one of many objects of notable design in the museum’s collection.

Funding support also tells the story of a museum. This project was successful in raising 5 million for a capital campaign including funding from the Gloucester Community Preservation Act, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Henry Luce Foundation, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, among others- and most recently the NEA for the upcoming Fitz Henry Lane Online project.

Although we could not pin her down on a new favorite spot to recommend (“Hopeful that folks will find their own!”)

THREE QUESTIONS FOR MUSEUM DIRECTOR RONDA FALOON

Congratulations on the successful capital campaign and major facilities renovation and collection updates! When did you start as Director?

“I worked as the Assistant Director from 2004-06 and was hired for the Director’s position in 2006. I’ve lived on Cape Ann for 25 years.”

How does it feel to be almost opening?

“10 months is a long time to be closed- I look forward to having people in the museum enjoying and enlivening the spaces!  Everyone here on staff has done more than 200% to make this transformation a reality.”

Is there anything you’ll miss from the prior design?

“Change is hard and it was tough to see rooms you loved being disassembled, but now that they have been replaced with something wonderful it’s exciting! We are so grateful to the members, friends, and community for being so very generous and offering such broad support.”

SAVE THE DATES

August 16 – Cape Ann Museum Reopening Gala

August 19- Museum grand reopening to the public

August 20 – Director’s Tour

August 21 – Members’ Reception

August 27 – Curator’s Tour

Cape Ann Museum website: www.capeannmuseum.org

Architect 2013-14 renovation: designLAB

Lighting designer: LAM Assoc

Exhibition consultant: Naomi Chapman

Display cases: Jeff Westlake

Locals businesses: Timberline, Spittle Electric, Hiltz, Clean Pro and many more

For more on the legacy of artists on Cape Ann and how important the Cape Ann Museum is…

LOOK UP this August to see Hopper, Homer, Hassam, Lane and more on billboards across the country. The Art Everywhere US campaign will feature works by American artists on displays, ads and transportation platforms across the country. Popular vote decided which images will go large. Visithttp://arteverywhereus.org/art-gallery to see the 58 works of art that were crowd sourced from high lights of 5 museums. Hopper, Homer, Lane, Hassam, Heade: images by artists with some Massachusetts and/or Cape Ann –and Cape Ann Museum–connections are represented. Edward Hopper’s Nighthawksat the Art Institute of Chicago received the most votes. Look for Homer’s Gloucester image, Breezing Up (A Fair Wind), from the National Gallery (which granted Gloucester permission for the Winslow Homer story moment marker for the Gloucester HarborWalk) and Lane’s Boston Harbor, Sunset, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Several artists have more than one image chosen (Homer, Cassatt, and O’Keefe to name a few).

You have to come see these works: Illuminating the world’s largest collection of America’s master luminist Fitz Henry Lane

Click for video with Cape Ann Museum Director Ronda Faloon-

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Cat Ryan writes-

RE-OPENING THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM with Director RONDA FALOON

Part 2 of 3: illuminating the world’s largest collection of America’s master luminist Fitz Henry Lane

 

 

In part 2 of touring the Cape Ann Museum, Director Ronda Faloon shares some of the NEW as we follow along with her. GET READY TO SEE THINGS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.

The Cape Ann Museum’s focus on art and artists is everywhere.

The dramatically redesigned welcome area and exhibition galleries enhance access and connections. There are new windows bringing the outside in. New amenities (welcome desk! coat room! lockers! bathroom!) on the ground floor orient and encourage us to get ready to take a breath, stop and look.

Hundreds of legacy pottery shards with transferred text from the museum’s archives are tucked along four new walls in Diane KW’s new installation, At World’s End- The Story of a Shipwreck.

When the Cape Ann Museum re-opens in August, the world’s largest repository of Gloucester’s very own Fitz Henry Lane collection will be 10x brighter thanks to new installation and lighting design. There’s more to Lane still to be revealed. Thanks to higher resolution images and powerful new media, the museum is producing a state of the art catalogue raissone and research tool, The Complete Works of Fitz Henry Lane, that will glow with close ups, archives, artifacts and stories. Nothing though can take the place of standing close and viewing these beauties in person. As Joey insists, “You have to come see these!”

It’s a GMG mission to make sure everyone understands how amazing this museum is and how fortunate it’s here in Gloucester.

SAVE THE DATES

August 16 – Cape Ann Museum Reopening Gala

August 19- Museum reopens to the public

August 20 – Director’s Tour

August 21 – Members’ Reception

August 27 – Curator’s Tour

 

Cape Ann Museum website: www.capeannmuseum.org

 

More on Diane Chen http://www.dianekw.com/ and here Cape Ann Ceramics Festival’s 2nd ambitious promotion of the medium is coming up August 7 –September 1 www.capeannceramicsfestival.org

Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane? Wall Street Journal focus on Fitz Henry Lane

Cat Ryan Submits-

Hi Joey

Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane?

Check out John Wilmerding’s review of Fitz Henry Lane’s half-dozen foggy views such as Ship Starlight in the Fog (c.1860) which is in the collection of the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, OH.

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http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694?mod=wsj_streaming_stream&mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694.html%3Fmod%3Dwsj_streaming_stream&fpid=2,7,121,122,201,401,641,1009

For more hazy light and atmosphere, rivers and tides, and artists born in MA: the WSJ  has covered the James Abbott McNeill Whistler biography by Sutherland

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and current Whistler exhibitions which you can check out if you hustle. An American in London: Whistler and the Thames at Addison Gallery of American Art is closing April 13, 2014. Go!

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No deadlines:

Make time to visit Ipswich and seek out work by Arthur Wesley Dow.

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And when it re-opens, Cape Ann Museum for all things Lane.

Fitz Hugh Lane (1804 – 1865) – Painter and Name Changer

Nathaniel Rogers Lane / Fitz Henry Lane / Fitz Hugh Lane

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He is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery in the Stevens’ Family plot. (more information at Cape Ann Museum)

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Bridget a new comer to Gloucester introduces Fitz Park to visitors from Ireland.

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Statues & Plaques of Gloucester From Peter Dorsey-Fitz Henry Lane

Joey,

This is one of the statues that inspired my series of the last few weeks in Good Morning Gloucester. It was after I noticed this statue of Fitz Henry (Hugh) Lane and the Joan of Arc statue, that I started looking around Gloucester for more and more statues and plaques. It has been a fun and interesting search for me. The legacy of Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865) and his wonderful paintings is such an important part of the artistic heritage of Gloucester. Just go to the Cape Ann Museum, and look at their enormous collection of these detailed, soothing seascapes. These paintings are world famous glimpses into life on and about Gloucester’s harbor and shores.

One of the things I learned about Fitz Henry Lane was that he was crippled as a child by ingesting some kind of a plant. And it was because he was unable to run around like other children his age that he became fascinated with drawing and sketching; and the thing that was nearby was Gloucester harbor, and its shipping activities. And because he had all this time to sit quietly sketching, he was able to see the play of light evolving at different times of the day; and fortunately for us, he became fascinated with the interplay of darkness and light. He was one of the school of luminous artists. Because his only formal training was with a lithograph and printing studio in Boston; he also showed the fine intricate details of many of the things that he painted. He took the painted equivalent of snapshots for us of nautical things that might not have been preserved from the workings of the Gloucester and other harbors of this day. His house where he lived as an adult, and created many of his paintings and drawings was in the center of what is now Harbor Loop. If you look at old photographs of the early 1900’s this, the western edge of Gloucester Harbor was packed with houses, warehouses and docks. All but this one granite constructed residence remains, and it was from this elevated perch that Fitz Henry Lane looked out often to the harbor. This life-like copper statue of him that is here was “Sculpted by Alfred M. Duca in 1997 “, and carved into the granite base it says, “step into my shoes and become inspired”, and next to that are a pair of copper or bronze sandals that are welded to the rock.

“I am have been a residential real estate broker for 26 years. Also, I am a novice rower down on Harbor Loop at the Gloucester Rowing Club at Maritime Gloucester. I have roots in this city that go back to 1919 when my father was born here. My grandfather worked as a scientist for John Hays Hammond at the time. Every year, as I do business in this city, and travel around Cape Ann, I find more and more interesting things that I see for the first time. I like to share some of these special places here on Good Morning Gloucester with my camera.”

Peter Dorsey

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