Tag Archives: Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester

Can major Gloucester paintings by Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer come back home? Appealing to Bill Gates and private collectors: please remember Gloucester!

Legions of fans visit local, national and international museums to see icons of American 20th century art by Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer. Some of this art was inspired by Gloucester, MA. One more Hopper or Homer Gloucester scene in any collection would be welcome, but in Gloucester it would be transformative.

The City of Gloucester boasts a world class museum that would be the ideal repository for a major Hopper and Homer of Gloucester. It hasn’t happened, yet. It should! I feel not enough of a case has been made for having originals right here in the city that inspired some of their most famous works and changed their art for the better.

Edward Hopper Captain’s House (Parkhurst House), one of the few original Hopper works remaining in private hands, is slated as a promised gift to Arkansas’s Crystal Bridges Museum of  American Art. Crystal Bridges opened in 2011 and will have acquired 4 examples of Hopper’s art — 2 paintings, 1 drawing and 1 print–with this gift. (I think Arkansas would have been ok with 3.)

Edward Hopper Parkhurst's House Captain's House 1924 watercolor private collection 100+ Gloucester homes and vistas inspired Hopper

 

The only known Winslow Homer seascape painting still in private hands is a great one inspired by Gloucester. Bill and Melinda Gates own Lost on the Grand Banks, 1885.  I saw it at the auction house back in 1998 just before the sale.  What a fit for Gloucester and Homer if it found its way back here!

 

Winslow Homer Lost on the Grand Banks 1885

 

Edward Hopper’s Gloucester Street also went to the west coast, purchased by Robert Daly. I’d love to see this one in person! The corner hasn’t changed much since 1928 when Hopper painted the street scene.

 

Gloucester Street edward hopper painting

Gloucester street painted by Edward Hopper TODAY.jpg

 

Hopper’s downtown Gloucester scene, Railroad Gates, is not on public display.

Edward Hopper Railroad Gates Gloucester MA

I’m surprised and hopeful that there are paintings of Gloucester by Hopper that could be secured. There are tens of drawings including major works on paper. I saw this Gloucester drawing, Circus Wagon, by Edward Hopper at the ADAA art Fair back in March 2016.

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Davis House (25 Middle Street) was sold at auction in 1996.

Edward Hopper Davis House, Middle Street Gloucester MA.jpg

I’m keeping tabs on most of them. The only way they’re going into any museum is through largesse. Why not Gloucester?

Homer and Hopper watercolors in private collections can’t be on permanent view due to the medium’s fragility. (Exciting developments in glazing and displays are being developed that go beyond the protective lift.) The Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester, MA, cares for works of art as well as any institution.

 

 

Film Cape Ann forwards P-town theater casting call for the role of artist Edward Hopper!

Apparently they have already cast the part of Jo Hopper (1883-1968), depicted sketching here in Gloucester on Good Harbor Beach, in a watercolor portrait by her husband, Edward Hopper (1882-1967),  in the collection of the Whitney Museum.

watercolor Jo sketching collection Whitney Museum- more than 110+ Edward Hopper all Around Gloucester

From CP CASTING

cp casting

CASTING MALE LEAD
Hopper’s Ghosts by Kevin Rice

Role: Edward Hopper, painter, age range, 40 – 55, tall, over 6’2″. Cultured, well-read, sophisticated, stoic, great sense of humor. Looking for experienced actor for two-character play about the famous realist painter Edward Hopper and his wife Jo.

Rehearsals begin August 21, 2017 
and play runs September 6-17, 2017.

This is a Payomet Performing Arts Center production with performances at the Provincetown Theater. Looking for union and non-union actors. Housing provided. Please send resume and headshot to: Kevin Rice: ricenow@yahoo.com

Hopper’s birthday was July 22. For the method actors-  A couple of years back I posted a 1960s video clip of the Hoppers in their NYC studio and home in NYC.  Click here to have a peek at what they looked like then!

 

What if Edward Hopper couldn’t take the train? MBTA train closure mitigation forum June 5 City Hall Gloucester

MBTA Mitigation Public Forum June 5 at 6:30pm in Gloucester City Hall-Kyrouz 2nd floor

landscape with bridge watercolor whitney

One of the most celebrated and beloved American artists of the twentieth century, Edward Hopper, frequently traveled by public rail from New York to Gloucester. Usually it’s fairly simple to experience Gloucester as Hopper and other notables did–by train and on foot. Hopper walked to lodgings just a short jaunt from the train station in downtown Gloucester and to the many sites he sketched and painted. The result was more than 110 works of art, including views of the Annisquam River Bridge to Cape Ann, the boarding house in downtown where he stayed, the railroad gates, and numerous other subjects still visible.

Today, the MBTA route that Hopper took not only serves weekday commuters, but brings visitors to this historic port. Trains connect New England history, the arts, and natural beauty. Summer or winter, trains make it easy to reach a beach, historical site, or favorite restaurant, to get out of the bustle and enjoy lingering in our coastal towns. They offer a real allure, crossing some of the most incredibly scenic vistas of our special New England landscape, and seasonally charming riders.

There’s no question that planned closures in the busiest of seasons will have negative impact for commuters and visitors. Desperate infrastructure needs will regrettably impede long lasting economic developments tied to Massachusetts’ cultural assets, out door recreation opportunities, and other attractions. The necessary closures do offer an opportunity to think about how to increase MBTA ridership including promoting New England’s historical, artistic and natural riches–MBTA as “Massachusetts’ green go-Between for the Train and Arts scene.”

photo captions: There are more than 110 Edward Hopper works of art inspired by Gloucester, MA. Four reference trains: that’s how he rolled. Above Untitled Edward Hopper drawing in the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art (catalogue “Landscape with Bridge.”) It is Gloucester, MA. I hope the new bridge design can add a little yellow bridge house reference. Below: Allegra Boverman, Gloucester Daily Times,  2012.

Sign up for city notices like this News Flash from Chris Sicuranza, Office of the Mayor Romeo Theken, posted on May 30, 2017:allegra

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Gloucester foreclosures include one of the 100+ Gloucester MA houses that Edward Hopper painted

Hopper by lees

Edward Hopper, Gloucester Houses, 1923, Whitney Museum of American Art, Josephine N Hopper bequest. You can match the boulders in Hopper’s drawing that the domiciles were built upon; Lee’s Breakfast Restaurant at the far right;  and the stacked granite blocks to the left of #7.

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What if…a section of Dogtown brush was cleared away? If you missed Chris Leahy at Sawyer Free Library last week come to a summit by Essex County Greenbelt & Mass Audubon at Cape Ann Museum March 4

“This Saturday morning forum is offered in collaboration with Essex County Greenbelt, Friends of Dogtown, Lanesville Community Center and Mass Audubon and held at Cape Ann Museum. The forum will be moderated by Ed Becker, President of the Essex County Greenbelt Association.”

Register here

UPDATE: Cape Ann TV is scheduled to film the event!

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Edward Hopper Cape Ann Pasture watercolor drawing (ca.1928) was gifted to Yale University in 1930

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East Gloucester Atwood’s Gallery on the Moors as seen on the left in 1921–open vistas at that time

 

Chris Leahy gave a presentation at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library on February 23, 2017: Dogtown- the Biography of a Landscape: 750 Million Years Ago to the Present
A photographic history through slides presented by the Gloucester Lyceum and the Friends of the Library. Mary Weissblum opened the program.

Chris broadly covered the history of the local landscape from an ecological bent with a bias to birds and blueberry picking, naturally. New England is a patchwork of forested landscapes. He stressed the evolution of bio diversity and succession phenomenon when the earth and climate change. “Nature takes a lot of courses.” He focused on Dogtown, “a very special place”, and possible merits of land stewardship geared at fostering greater biodiversity. Perhaps some of the core acres could be coaxed to grasslands as when parts of Gloucester were described as moors? Characteristic wildlife, butterflies, and birds no longer present may swing back.  There were many philosophical takeaways and tips: he recommends visiting the dioramas “Changes in New England Landscape” display at Harvard Forest HQ in Petersham.

“Isolation of islands is a main driver of evolution”

“Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary in Worcester has the highest concentration* of native butterflies in all of Massachusetts because of secondary habitats.”  *of Mass Audubon’s c.40,000 acres of wildlife sanctuaries statewide. “The fact that Brook Meadow Brook is in greater Worcester, rather than a forested wilderness, underscores the value of secondary habitats.”

“1830– roughly the time of Thoreau (1817-1862)– was the maximum period of clearing thus the heyday for grasslands…As farmsteads were abandoned, stages of forests return.”

Below are photos from February 23, 2017. I added some images of art inspired by Dogtown. I also pulled out a photograph by Frank L Cox, David Cox’s father, of Gallery on the Moors  (then) compared with a photo of mine from 2011 to illustrate how the picturesque description wasn’t isolated to Dogtown.

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Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Granite, 1928, oil on canvas can we get this painting into the Cape Ann Museum collection?

dogtown-cape-ann-massachuestts-by-louise-upton-brumback-o-c-vose-galleryLouise Upton Brumback (1867-1929), Dogtown- Cape Ann, 1920 oil on canvas

atwood-cox-gallery-on-the-moors-photo-1921

Orbitz gifs Edward Hopper in Motion

There are a lot of Hopper gifs out there and now Orbitz add 9 Edward Hopper in MotionFly into Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, New York, Washington to see the real deal.

Automat, Des Moines Art Center, IA
Chop Suey, private collection
Hotel Window, Forbes Magazine collection
House by the Railroad Tracks, MoMa
Lighthouse Hill, Dallas Museum of Art
Morning Sun, Columbus Museum of Art
New York Movie, MoMa
Nighthawks, Art Institute of Chicago
People in the Sun, Smithsonian

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Smithsonian American Art Museum “An Edward Hopper Scrapbook”

http://americanart.si.edu/hopper/

Art museums in Massachusetts are closer than they appear. Gloucester, Google maps and upcoming exhibitions

 

museums-in-massachusetts-in-google-maps-by-catherine-ryan

Last week I was in the Amherst area to meet with clients at a museum. I added on a couple of exhibitions that I knew were closing before I’d be back in that area. I have to map out shows or I miss them.

If you do an online search for ‘art museums in Massachusetts’ or ‘best of’ museum inquiries there are several helpful lists that pop up. The New England Museum Association for one has stepped up their digital presence for their membership directory. Still, must-see institutions on the North Shore and Cape Ann are rarely high lighted, buried deeply, and frequently absent from compilation lists ( see omissions at Artcyclopedia, Massvacation, Tripadvisor, visit Massachusetts, art-collecting, etc.)

Here’s a link to Massachusetts Art Museums created in Google maps. Part 2 Massachusetts 2016 fall/winter museum exhibition guide coming!

Upcoming show trends include: illuminated manuscripts, citizenship, art of picture books, and vintage and contemporary photography.

 

 

 

Gloucester portraits: Good Harbor Beach piping plover and David Rimmer Essex County Greenbelt with an Edward Hopper house. And Leon Kroll double bridge.

There are more than 110 portraits of the City of Gloucester by the American artist Edward Hopper. There are a few 1923 Good Harbor Beach scenes including one with Jo Nivison seated sketching, and in the distance Bass Rocks and a ‘Hopper’ house. That vista was already a Gloucester motif.

Copy of Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MA (more than 90 works) (73)

piping plover with Hopper house

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Dave with Hopper house

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Dave with Hopper house                                                                                                                                  David Rimmer, Director of Land Stewardship, Essex County Greenbelt monitoring piping plovers 2016, Good Harbor Beach.

 

 

Eleven years before the image of Jo sketching, Hopper painted the other side of Good Harbor (Brier Neck) when he first came to New England. Leon Kroll painted two pedestrian bridges on the Bass Rocks side of the beach that same year.

Copy of Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MA (more than 90 works) (75)

Note the double bridges on Good Harbor.

Leon Kroll 1912 double bride 26 x 32 oil on

Leon Kroll, 1912, oil on canvas, (Good Harbor Beach, Gloucester) 26 x 32

 

Leon Kroll 1912 oil on canvas 26 x 32  sold at Sothebys 2011 bridge at bass rocks informal title 170,500

Leon Kroll 1911, 26 x 32 oil on canvas (Bridge at Bass Rocks) sold at Sotheby’s auction in 2011 for $115,700

8 point 5 by 10 three quarters 1912 leon kroll

Leon Kroll, 1912 oil on panel, 8.5 x 11-3/4

 

Knoll also painted Niles and Pavilion. He kept returning to Gloucester; eventually his family purchased a home in Folly Cove in 1932. Learn more at Cape Ann Museum and see Kroll works of art on display.

Leon Kroll Niles Beach 26 x 32

Leon Kroll, Niles Beach 1913

Copy of Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MA (more than 90 works) (74)

Copy of Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MA (more than 90 works) (71)

Gloucester in the house at North Carolina Museum

A rare Edward Hopper drawing of East Main Street, Gloucester, is part of a comprehensive exhibit, “Marks of Genius”, masterpieces from the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA) on view at the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) through June 19th. These wonders of process traveled to the Grand Rapids Art Museum in Michigan before Raleigh. The next stop will be the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.  The Hopper is featured at every venue, and so is Gloucester. 

If it were your museum, where would you hang the Hopper?  The NCMA installed the drawings in their largest special exhibition space by subject rather than chronologically, the design choice of other venues. How do I know? Exhibitions Assistant, Margaret Gaines, was kind enough to share details and photographs of the museum and its beautiful Meymandi Exhibition Gallery in the East Building so that we could all armchair art gawk. (I smiled when I read that East Main Street is in the East building of this East coast museum.) “Gloucester” is written on the museum label along with my research and color photograph.

“American Impressionist: Childe Hassam and the Isle of Shoals” is up at the same time.  Childe Hassam has Gloucester and Massachusetts ties, but I didn’t ask to see pictures of that exhibit. Though “Marks of Genius”  won’t be coming any closer to Massachusetts than North Carolina, the Hassam show is coming to the Peabody Essex Museum on July 16th. The North Carolina Museum of Art partnered with PEM. I wouldn’t miss it.

NC Museum of Art raleigh estab 1924

DI25547-09DI25547-08my photoHopper detail2

 

Here’s another photograph pulled back to compare the house with the Hopper sketch and choices.

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Exh entrances

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Thank you to Our Sweet Friend and GMG Contributor Catherine Ryan

I met Catherine initially through my work designing the HarborWalk gardens as she was very much involved with making the wonderful granite story markers placed throughout the HarborWalk (she also had a hand in many aspects of the HarborWalk’s creation). Catherine is a regular contributor to Good Morning Gloucester and her posts most often feature the work of Gloucester artists, along with covering a wide range of art and cultural related events.

I am so appreciative of our friendship, and also want to highlight some of the valuable volunteer pro bono work she does as the Mayor’s Representative on Gloucester’s Committee for the Arts. In that capacity, she works with the steering committee for the Gloucester Harbortown Cultural District,  provides on-going expertise for the Gloucester HarborWalk, and works on countless other statewide and New England regional outreach projects, coordinating with many cultural districts beyond our own.

As you may or may not be aware, Catherine created the interactive Google map with over 100 sites and images by Edward Hopper from his many visits to Gloucester: See Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester here.

image001Gloucester to Berkshires Map by Catherine Ryan. Click to view larger.

I was so touched by Catherine that she made the above map for my participation in the Berkshire Museum’s exhibit “Butterflies” and for my upcoming film screenings there. On Friday I learned that the Museum has scheduled a showing of Life Story of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly to air on Sunday, July 13th. We are planning additional activities around the event and I will keep you posted. So many thanks to Catherine for making this helpful map and providing a handy visual for GMG readers planning to make the trek out to Pittsfield and the Berkshires. 

Catherine writes ~

“I am SO HAPPY for you! Here’s a visual map to Western MA and proximity of some of the major Berkshire art & cultural highlights including 5 nearby Cultural Districts.

Gloucester to Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA 169 miles
Berkshire Museum to Mass MoCA 35 miles
Berkshire Museum to newly re-opened Clark 31 miles
Berkshire Museum to Tanglewood 14 minutes
Berkshire Museum to Amherst (many museums in this area, too) approx. 1 hour and twenty minutes

*Gloucester has 2 Cultural Districts and Pittsfield has one also. There are 4 other cultural districts in western MA (3 are within the Amherst vicinity): Springfield, Northampton, Easthampton + Shelburne.”