Tag Archives: Eastern Point

Tourists from Washington D.C.

Grandfather, Father and Son 3 generations visit Gloucester from Washington D.C.  Father and son came up to watch the Red Sox play the Washington Nationals.

FYI – They were all Red Sox fans.  The young man also counted 537 Granit Blocks he walked on all the way out to the Beacon.

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#GloucesterMA Eastern Point Thawing!

 

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Kim Smith Cosmos ©Kim Smith 2014 -mediumFriend me on Facebook and follow me on TwitterInstagram, and Vine. You can also subscribe to my design website at Kim Smith Designs, and film’s websites at Beauty on the Wing ~ Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly, Gloucester’s Feast of Saint Joseph Community Film Project, and Life Story of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly.

Seals Basking…In the Fog?

Seals Brace Cove Brace's Rock ©Kim Smith 2015The seals appeared as delighted as we were for today’s return of warmer temperatures. Despite the lack of sunshine, I counted 22 socializing and lollygagging, five on one rock alone!Seals Brace Cove Brace's Rock Eastern point Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015

Niles Pond driftwood ©Kim Smith 2015JPGThe giant twelve-foot log tossed by the sea, up and over onto the Niles Pond side of the causeway, is seemingly supported by nothing but frozen snow. And Niles Pond is still thawing, with only a small cluster of mallards huddled together in the center of the ice. I hope the swans return soon!

Niles Pond frozen ©Kim Smith 2015

They That Go Down to the Sea in Ships

Snowy morning scenes from the boulevard and Eastern Point Lighthouse.

They that go down to the sea in ships.

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

The Fisherman 's Family

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Snowy Day Eastern Point Lighthouse

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

More Coyotes On Eastern Point Photos From Tom Janis #GloucesterMA

Joey,
Hi.  I appreciate Good Morning Gloucester! 
Here are 4 coyotes walking through my backyard (Brace Cove in the distance) just now.  I wonder how they’re surviving.
Best,
Tom Janisimage

I took this with my iPhone so not great quality, but here are 4 coyotes walking through my backyard just now (Brace Cove behind).
Enjoy Good Morning Gloucester!  Thanks.
Tom Janis

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Joey,
Hi!    Here they are again this morning.  All four were on the rock, in the sun, but it took too long for my phone to power on, but I was able to catch the last one crossing the rock.  I’m pretty sure I know where their den is now (and they really worry me because I have a dog).  I see them every day!
Best,
Tom Janis

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Tremendous News for Gloucester

TS Eliot’s Restless Ghost Finds Home in Seaside Idyll

The Guardian UK

February 14, 2015

By Robert McCrum

Last September, listeners to National Public Radio, the US equivalent of Radio 4, heard an elderly New England widow, Dana Hawkes, describe how, at home in Massachusetts, her late husband would sometimes say “he used to see TS Eliot’s ghost.”

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TS Eliot at his house, 18 Edgemoor in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Photograph: © Estate of T.S. Eliot

There is something apt in this claim. The author of Four Quartets and Murder in the Cathedral, who was born in St Louis on 26 September 1888, but lived and died in London, has always projected a rather spectral persona.

From his haunting recitation of The Waste Land (“Unreal city …”) to his cadaverous alter ego, Old Possum, and his fascination with clairvoyants such asMadame Sosostris, Eliot has always been a sombre, other-worldly figure in the literary landscape.

In his afterlife, as an Anglo-American literary giant with a long shadow, the poet’s psychic exile has never been quite fully commuted. Despite a memorial stone in Poet’s Corner and the kind of instant recognition known to Shakespeare, Keats and Wordsworth, TS Eliot has no shrine to equal Stratford, Hampstead or Grasmere.

Even in his native America, Eliot has remained homeless. In New England, Concord celebrates Henry Thoreau. Emily Dickinson is remembered in Amherst, and Nathaniel Hawthorne in Salem.

In contrast, the founding father of Modernism and author of The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock, seems remote and unaffiliated. For all his British citizenship and membership of the Church of England, Eliot has become strangely rootless.

But now, 50 years after his death, and two years after the passing of Valerie, his beloved second wife, Eliot’s ghost is being appeased. The Observer has learned that, in a remarkable coup, the poet’s estate has just acquired the Eliot family’s summer house by the sea, in Gloucester, Massachusetts. READ FULL STORY HERE

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18 Edgemoor, Eastern Point ~ The Eliot family house in Massachusetts. Photograph: © Estate of T.S. Eliot

Not only has the estate bought the house (for $1.3m), it plans to use it to promote Eliot’s life and works to his American readers. Reihill said: “By this time next year we hope to offer up to six poets, essayists or playwrights at a time a peaceful retreat to work on their projects. We’d also like to work with institutions of higher education to make it a centre for weekend symposia on Eliot or on poets and poetry related to him.”

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View from the porch at 18 Edgemoor

8fc3e992-f4e5-4cc9-a34d-4e17bef04ec9-2060x1590Young Tom with his mother at the house in 1895. Photograph: © Estate of T.S. Eliot

a837a9d4-afbb-4945-ad0f-37ed841ad09c-2060x1236TS Eliot with his cousins Eleanor and Barbara Hinkley in Gloucester in 1897. Photograph: © Estate of T.S. Eliot

15af223f-8f88-47ba-83b2-66fd435218c5-2060x1236Tom sitting on the veranda in his sailor suit playing with his toy yacht, and reading.Photograph: © Estate of T.S. Eliot

Shared on FB by Eastern Point Lit House co-founder Chris Anderson.

Framing up Again

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Along with my recovery comes more energy, and I’m able to frame more photos at the gallery. On Saturday, I framed “Brace Cove, Eastern Point” and the map “Pigeon Cove, 1884.” I think we’ll be in pretty good shape for the holiday season, as I continue to deck the walls.

New Film: A Flight of Monarchs

When watching, know that the first two minutes of the film were shot in Gloucester. I think you will be dazzled by the sheer numbers of Monarchs that travel through Cape Ann’s backyards and meadows during the peak of migration.

I began photographing the Monarchs in 2006, which was a year when we had an extraordinary number of Monarchs visiting our shores. At that time, I became determined that if ever again this phenomenon were to occur on Cape Ann, I was going to have the ability to document on film, rather than only through still images, this beautiful event for my community. It’s hard to imagine without observing and here you can see what I have wanted to share.

A Flight of Monarchs begins on a September day as first one and then passels of Monarchs begin to arrive to the fields and meadows of Cape Ann, carried across Massachusetts Bay on a tailwind. By the early evening light they begin to pour into the surrounding trees, clustering to stay warm in the branches furthest away from the prevailing breezes. The following morning as the sun begins to touch their wings, they alight from the trees, seeking the freshest wildflowers from which to drink nectar to help build their lipid reserves for the several thousand mile journey south. They drink and drink until the last of the sun’s rays dip below the tree line. As they arrived on a tailwind, they again depart, and are carried to the next gathering area. For coastal Monarchs, Allens Pond, which is located in Westport, Massachusetts is often the next stop.

In the next scene, the butterflies have arrived to the sacred oyamel fir forests of Angangueo, Michoacán, deep in the heart of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. It’s early morning and the butterflies are suspended in great primordial branched clusters that may become so heavy from the weight of so many butterflies the boughs of the trees bend to the breaking point. Later in the day, as the sun begins to warm their wings, the butterflies begin to stir. During the winter, it is imperative that the Monarch’s body temperature remains relatively low. They leave the sunniest branches in search of shade and a drink of water from nearby mountain streams. Occasionally in late February, as the air temperatures begin to warm with the coming springtime, for a short period during the day, the butterflies leave the trees all at once. This phenomenon is called a butterfly “explosion,” and is a truly magnificent event to observe.

A Flight of Monarchs is set to the evocative and tender “Fields of Blue,” written and performed by composer and guitarist Jesse Cook and his band, to which permission was granted by the artist for the purpose of this short film. Here is a link to Cook’s website. I highly, highly recommend attending a live performance of Jesse Cook and Company. As was I, you will be completely taken by their gorgeous music, exquisite artistry, and with Cook’s songwriting, will travel in beautiful melodies inspired from around the world.

I am currently editing my feature length documentary, Beauty on the Wing, which after months and months of organizing and editing three years of footage, is currently running at approximately twelve hours in length. At eleven hours too long, I have a great deal of editing to accomplish in the coming winter months!

A Flight of Monarchs presented here is the shorter version of the film that I created for the Berkshire Museum’s “Butterflies” exhibit. The first version is six minutes long and played on a continuous loop in the main gallery of the exhibit hall. The longer version will soon be posted on Vimeo.

 

Niles Beach in the Thickening Fog

Niles Beach Foggy Afternon ©Kim Smith 2014After a day of madly painting interior rooms, whipping our home into shape for the holidays, and for Liv’s upcoming wedding, I took a walk to get out of the paint fumes in what I had hoped would be a lifting fog. Instead of dissipating, around every bend in the road the fog became increasingly dense.  Albeit beautifully atmospheric, I imagined how dangerous it would be to be aboard a ship in the heavy fog and wouldn’t have wanted for anything to be a sailor or fisherman yesterday.

 

October Nor’easter Storm Snapshots

Eastern Point Seagulls ©Kim Smith 2014Out on Eastern Point this morning great flocks of seagulls were riding the waves while the Niles Pond swans and ducks were tucked into their shoreline retreats. The cormorants were many and could be seen clustering on rocky perches all around the inner harbor.

Niles Pond Swans ©kim Smith 2014Gloucester’s DPW crews were out and about clearing the streets from downed limbs.Gloucester DPW ©Kim Smith 2014

I only stayed for a moment at the Brace Cove berm because the waves were so tremendous that it really didn’t feel safe. I am glad to report though that at 10:30 this morning the narrowest slip of land that prevents Niles Pond from becoming Brace Cove’s salt marsh appears to have weathered this October nor’easter.

Brace Cove seagulls ©Kim Smith 2014

storm damage Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2014Downed Tree Mangles Portable Potty

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