Tag Archives: East Gloucester


East Gloucester Friends,

Please be on alert for a pair of very bold coyotes in the neighborhood. Over the weekend I was standing with a group of photographer friends and we were noticing the coyotes along the edge of a field. The coyotes ducked behind the shrubby growth and soon after, my friends left. I became distracted and forgot about the coyotes while photographing a chatty little Downy Woodpecker. Without warning, the coyotes were suddenly quite near, within twenty feet. I yelled and clapped loudly, which did not in the least intimidate one of the pair. The smaller trotted a few steps back toward the woodland edge while the larger one started to dig in the ground, similar to a bull marking his territory. It was more than a little eerie, and while yelling I began to walk backwards off the field.

When a gentleman came to the field to walk his dog, the coyotes headed back towards the shrubs. Reappearing a few minutes later, they had circled around in the shrubs and began to stalk the leashed dog. I walked towards the man to give the coyotes the idea that we were a group and they didn’t come any closer after that. This post is not meant to alarm anyone, but to let you know that we have some very hungry coyotes in our midst; I had the oddest sensation that they had an expectation of dinner. I sure do hope no one is feeding them.

The bolder coyote is on the left in the above photo. You can see in the middle photo in the first row that the bolder one’s coat is darker (also on the left).


The internationally recognized “peace sign” was designed by Gerald Holtom as the logo for a group at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom known as the British Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. The peace sign was adopted by counterculture and antiwar activists around the globe. Davis Street, East Gloucester

Boston Globe on T.S. Eliot family home in Gloucester MA at last a writers retreat

“…UK-based T.S. Eliot Foundation purchased the home for $1.3 million, announcing its plan to transform the residence into a writers retreat. Two years of planning and construction later, the foundation has made good on its promise, quietly welcoming its first cohort of poets, writers, and editors this summer…”

Link to Malcolm Gay article




Gloucester art and breakfast | Zeke’s Place



On the walls at Zeke’s place, summer 2017:


Nancy Alimansky from Newton and Phyllis Paster from Wellesley are showing drawings in the main room. Both watercolor artists have painted Cape Ann scenes, many from Gloucester and Rockport.


Nancy Alimansky #1


Phyllis Paster #2

David Kielier resides and works in Gloucester.



The first business to respond to the Mayor’s arts hotline was Zeke’s Place.



All is well with Plover Families, on both the West and East sides of Gloucester!


Friend and East Gloucester resident Dan Allen sent along these wonderful snapshots of recent visits by songbirds in his beautiful garden. Dan’s garden is abundant with wildflowers, food, and welcome shelter for birds, bees and butterflies. Thank you Dan!Nothing common about this gorgeous little warbler, a male Common Yellowthroat. Yellowthroats migrate north from winter homes in Florida, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

Yesterday I posted photos of a male Eastern Towhee. Dan’s photo is of the female! Wherever the male’s feathers are black, the female’s are milk chocolate brown.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is another nesting migrant to Cape Ann. They eat fruit, seeds, nuts, insects, and especially Love sunflower seeds. Only the males have this striking feather pattern; the female’s feathers are shaded in quiet tones of gray, tan, and brown. During the winter months, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks live in the Caribbean, and Central and South America.



The coyote was trotting down Bass Ave in the direction of Good Harbor Beach. It paused briefly at the garden at the corner of Bass Ave and Brightside and then proceeded to jaunt up Brightside before ducking into a yard.

Coyote bopping along Bass and Brightside Avenues Friday 7:30am, school bus pick up time.

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Boulevard Public Works stunner | Gloucester is an early client for the Harvard and Olmsted trained landscape designer Thomas Warren Sears. His 1908 photos are a must see!




The Gloucester Daily Times published this image in 1923 with the photo caption: “Now Under Construction on the Southern Side of Western Avenue, this Project When Completed Will Give Gloucester one of the Finest Approaches of Any City on the Atlantic Seaboard.”  The meticulously hand drawn credit within the drawing itself caught my eye as much as the drawing: “Proposed Treatment of Waterfront, Gloucester, Mass. Thomas W. Sears Landscape Architect, Providence RI”. Thomas W. Sears was a remarkable 20th Century landscape designer. The modern Boulevard work completed in 2014-17 gracefully carries out and returns to the original dreams for the Western Avenue highway and park that are more than a century in the making.



photo caption: Boulevard construction progress © Catherine Ryan, December 2016 

Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966) preliminary designs for Gloucester’s future Boulevard

Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts, and grew up in this modest family abode at the corner of Beacon and Charles Street. This black and white house portrait was shot in 1897.

1897 Thomas William Sears the Sears family home Brookline corner of Beacon and charles streets

Here’s a Google street view photo for comparison today.

google earth brookline sears family home


After being ousted from the New York City parks department, the ‘father of American landscape design’, Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), launched his business a ten minute walk from the Sears family home.  The headquarters at 99 Warren Street was named “Fairsted” and was in operation until 1979 when it was declared a National Historic Site and transferred to the National Parks.



photo caption: Frederick Law Olmsted Fairsted  © Jack Boucher, Library of Congress collection

Sears worked for the Olmsted Brothers immediately after receiving two degrees from Harvard– his BA in 1903 and his BS in 1906. (There may have been an earlier Brookline connection.) Rather quickly Sears left to set up his own firm: first in Providence, RI, when he did work for Gloucester’s Boulevard, and not long after in Philadelphia. In 1911 he gave a talk for the Proceedings of the Engineers’ Club of Philadelphia 28 (April 1911):147-158., “The Functions of the Landscape Architect in Connection with the Improvement of a City” available online as part of an urban planning anthology compiled by John W. Reps, Professor Emeritus, Cornell University.  I wonder if he shared his Gloucester photographs as part of his talk?

“There are two main approaches to cities: (1) On water by boat, and (2) on land by railroad. Along both of these lines of approach land should be taken for public use, and for very different reasons. Take first the use of water fronts: Unless some provision is made for the public, the whole water front, whether it be river or harbor, may be usurped by commercial enterprise and the public deprived of ever seeing the water except when aboard a boat. In certain cases, as in New York, where the water front must of necessity be utilised for dockage, a combination of commercial and public use may be successfully employed. There the docks are owned by the city and leased by the steamship companies; in this way their appearance can be controlled. At present it is planned to build on the tops of these docks huge recreation parks which may be used by the public.”- 1911 Thomas W. Sears

Mike Hale’s contemporary perspective shares a similar philosophy with Sears:

“An effort has been made in this paper to show clearly that landscape architecture is utilitarian quite as much as esthetic; that whatever one is designing, whether it be a city plan or any of the elements in a city, the design should be governed by use as much as beauty.” – 1911 Thomas W. Sears

By 1917 Sears was commissioned regularly and had a long, full career including notable designs for the Reynolda estate now part of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the wildly influential outdoor amphitheater for Swarthmore College, the Scott Outdoor Auditorium. His work in Gloucester is rarely mentioned.

Since the Gloucester drawing was marked ‘Providence’, I knew the drawing was done long before the 1923 construction. I tentatively dated the schematic ca.1910. Thankfully Thomas Warren Sears was a photographer, too. Turns out that this image is a Sears’ photograph of a lovely Sears’ design. The glass negative is dated 1908 which squares with his professional career timeline.


thomas Warren Sears rendering and photograph aag title a perspective drawing for the area along what is now stacy boulevard


One of the modern design elements is the welcome ornamentation of lights. They feel like they were always here because line is such an essential part of design and they add the vertical visual interest. When I saw the new light bases I thought of the line of trees in the Sears drawing. I love the mix of natural and formal design in his rendering, but am equally gobsmacked by the sweeping open vista. Both are sensitive approaches and part of the context of the Boulevard’s build.


photo caption: animation emphasizing new lights, late November 2016, ©c. ryan


Thomas Warren Sears photographed Western Avenue for his preparatory work. See the homes along the beach that were later removed for the construction of the Boulevard; distant vistas to the Surfside Hotel (built after Pavilion burned) and Stage Fort park; and Western Avenue street scenes looking east and west before the road was widened.


Thomas Warren Sears seawall and park area1908 Thomas Warren Sears looking west along the seawall

Thomas warren Sears glass negative houses along the beach later removed for the creation of Stacy Boulevard

More photos and Gloucester designs:

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Artist Carol Kriekis hand painted Gloucester designs

Thanks to the Holiday Delights Youth Acting Program at Gloucester Stage, I had the lucky chance to spend some time with artist Carol Kriekis. I thought her home and studio were a perfect reflection of her warmth and style, elegant and layered like an Aesthetic Movement interior. Kriekis works in different media, mostly grounded in representation. I saw series inspired by nature and renderings of flowers.

Recently she’s transformed her classic ‘Glosta’ and other Gloucester designs into oval stickers, each with some hand flourish.   The potential for art everywhere around us — stickers, hand painted–  that had me thinking about aestheticism, too. img_20161211_192842-2

Commission design for clients:

Photograph below shows some new branding design by Carol. There’s something coming this spring for Caffe Sicilia…No reveals, yet.



Loving every minute of a snowbound afternoon

Home sweet home ❣

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It's a hot cocoa kind of day ❄️❄️❄️

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We hope the old FV Blue Ocean is salvageable after breaking mooring in the gale force winds late last night. The Blue Ocean is a wooden converted Eastern rig side dragger. The ship was built in 1952 and is owned by Michael Ragusa of Gloucester. Beach clean-up is well underway and as reported in the Gloucester Times, the boat does not pose an environmental threat because there was no fuel or oil on board. Photos from this morning at high tide and then again at low tide this afternoon. gloucester-shipwreck-fv-blue-ocean-1-copyright-kim-smithgloucester-shipwreck-fv-blue-ocean-6-copyright-kim-smith


Shipwreck at Niles Beach

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For more photos of the Blue Ocean see Paul Frontiero’s post from 2014


juni-van-dyke-cape-ann-museum-the-neighborhood-quilt-project-pete-kovner-c2a9kim-smith-2016Pete Kovner at the Cape Ann Museum exhibit

Monday, the 17th, at 2:00pm, Juni and her amazing quilt makers will be unveiling the East Gloucester Quilt, number fifteen, their last and final piece. The simple ceremony honoring those who helped in its creation will take place at the Rose Baker Senior Center. The public is welcome to attend. I am looking forward to the Big Reveal! juni-van-dyke-cape-ann-museum-the-neighborhood-quilt-project-detail-c2a9kim-smith-2016Greasy Pole detail


Glorious Spring!

Cherry Blossom Cascade Kim SmithCherry Blossom Plum Stree East Gloucester Kim SmithPlum Street East Gloucester

Beautiful "Snow Goose" cherry tree with bee

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Note to gardeners: Are you having problems with winter moths? Trees in the Rose Family (Rosaceae), cherry trees, plum trees, peach trees, and apple trees, for example, are especially devastated by the larval stage of these voracious eaters. There is no perfect solution. The worst thing to do is to spray your trees with chemical pesticides and herbicides because that will kill the good insects (bees, butterflies, and other beneficials) and not fully destroy the bad.

After blooming, spray horticultural oil on the branches, foliage, and trunk. This won’t totally wipe out the winter moths (nothing does), but it will act as a deterrent. Apply the horticultural oil about once every month or two, through January, as the adult moths deposit their eggs in the chinks of bark during the winter months.


Amazing! #tempestworld #eastgloucesterelementary #gloucesterma

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The East Gloucester fifth grade class play is one in which the younger grade students look forward to participating, beginning in their earliest elementary years. This year’s play, William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, directed by Dawn Sarrouf, does not disappoint, and is simply beyond outstanding. Every minute is filled with action packed stellar performances by the fifth grade students, exquisite costumes, imaginative lighting and special effects, and all playing to a rhythmical back stage drum beat.

Don’t miss the final performance on Monday, April 4th at 6pm at the East Gloucester School auditorium.

Don't miss this! #eastgloucesterelementary #tempestworld Tuesday night final show

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Friends, family, and fans

FullSizeRender (52)Marissa and Kathy

FullSizeRender (51)Martine and Maria

FullSizeRender (54)Lotus and Jason

FullSizeRender (55)Orlando12916249_10153727918443073_7330075060340996844_o


Easter Sunset Gloucester Harbor. 

Last night’s saturated sunset from East Gloucester was arresting, becoming even more so after the sun set. The colors on the water momentarily reflected the voluptuous hues of the twilight sky, when very quickly the horizon turned glowing coral-pink-peach before extinguishing itself in purple.

Gloucester Harbor Smiths Cove sunset Kim Smith

The violet-orange on the water’s glass-like surface in the foreground looked as though it had been applied by paint.

Gloucester Harbor UU Church sunset Kim Smith

Gloucester’s Unitarian Universalist Church beautiful steeple

City Hall Gloucester Harbor Sunset

City Hall



Snow Day in the Hood!

The smell of yummy things cooking emanating from Duckworth's is so enticing!

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Duckworth's looks so pretty on a snowy evening!

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Beacon Marine Basin

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One Pirates Lane

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