Tag Archives: David Bowie

Don’t make the Bowie Mistake I made in 1973, 1974 & at least a dozen times since…

When I was a teenager it felt like I’d live forever.  By 18 or 19 I had lost that feeling of invincibility, but transferred some of its essence to a select group of celebrities whom I admired.  David Bowie was one of those lucky few. Brilliant, enigmatic, mysterious … in my mind, mythical … it felt like Bowie would live forever.

I had a chance to see the Ziggy Stardust tour in NYC, but for some reason it didn’t work out. Funny how I can’t remember what kept me from going, but if I had seen Bowie in 1973, I’m quite sure I’d have no problem recalling THAT experience today.

Then in 1974 I had a chance to see his Diamond Dogs tour when he came to Indianapolis. “But I want to see Ziggy,” I thought. (A friend who had gone to the show I was too “busy” to attend told me how “completely blown away” he was.)  I’ll just wait until he comes back around with that show.

Here’s the thing: Bowie never came back around with anything. Rather, he broke barriers and blew our minds for another 42 years … and every time I might have seen Bowie live there was always something keeping me from going, any sense of urgency lulled to sleep by my fabricated assumption that he’d be around forever.

When I saw “The Man Who Fell to Earth” (I think at the Harvard Square Theatre — still one of my favorite movies) I remember saying to myself I MUST see Bowie live someday.

Monday morning when I awoke to the news of Bowie’s death (which felt shockingly untimely) reality hit: “Planet Earth is blue and there’s nothing I can do …” I’m never going to see Bowie live.

Vickie and I were just saying last week that we had to see Bowie on this next tour … and I was confident that we would because, even as recently as last week, it still felt like Bowie would live forever.  And he will through his music.  We still have that … here’s his latest masterpiece.

Velvet Underground

This is definitely not what Lou Reed, John Cale, Angus MacLise, Sterling Morrison, and  Michael Leigh had in mind…

The release of the album Transformer was a seminal moment in our cultural history. The first video features David Bowie and Lou Reed with interesting interviews (with the Little Joe and Holly of the song’s fame), film clips, and photographs of the early days. The video ends abruptly, in mid-sentence.

An oft quoted statement attributed to Brian Eno is, “The first Velvet Underground album only sold 10,000 copies, but everyone who bought it formed a band.”

Lou Reed, John Cale, Angus MacLise, and Sterling Morrison were the four original members of the Velvet Underground. Michael Leigh wrote the pulp paperback The Velvet Underground, from which the band took its name. The book The Velvet Underground is about the sexual subculture of the early 1960s.