Tag Archives: Coyote

GLOUCESTER’S COYOTE ORDINANCE AMENDED

COYOTE raiding garbage can left outside house. Rocky Mountains. (Canis latrans).

Photo courtesy google image search

Gloucester’s Animal Advisory Board member Jen Holmgren shares the following:

Last night, in a unanimous vote, the City Council approved an important animal-related measure initiated by Councilors Valerie Gilman and Scott Memhard. The Animal Ordinance GCO Section 4-2 has now been updated to reflect the prohibition of the feeding of coyotes as well as gulls and pigeons.

This type of thing may only seem to be common sense, but without an ordinance in place, the police or other authorities, and even neighbors, don’t have a legal leg to stand on. This is a solid, much-needed step in the right direction.

Thanks, and have a good day!Eastern Coyote Canis latrans massachusetts Kim Smith

Wildlife biologist and coyote expert Jonathan Way to speak at Salem State Tuesday, February 28

WHAT:                Jonathan Way, PhD will be on campus to describe his work investigating the behavior and social ecology of coyotes and to discuss public policy regarding predators. The talk is part of the Wellness U Experiencing Wildlife Series, which is organized by the Human Dimensions of Wildlife Unit of the Bates Center for Public Affairs. This free event is open to media and the public.

WHEN:                Tuesday, February 28, 2017 from 11 am to 12 pm

WHERE:               Salem State University

                              352 Lafayette Street | Salem, MA  01970

                              MLK Room, Ellison Campus Center

WHO:                  Dr. Way is the author of two books related to the study of coyotes, one of which, Suburban Howls, details his experiences studying eastern coyotes in Massachusetts. Dr. Way details and runs the Eastern Coyote/Coywolf Research organization where he is continuing his goal of long-term ecological and behavioral research on coywolves. Dr. Way’s second book details his experience at Yellowstone National Park, where he takes regular trips to study coyotes. 

 

Here is Jon Way’s website- http://www.easterncoyoteresearch.com/

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LAST NIGHT’S COYOTE MEETING RECAP

img_4109Pat Huckery 

The informational meeting was conducted by Pat Huckery, the northeast district manager for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and was nearly identical to the meeting given last year at this time.

Pat presented the life history of the coyote as well as a number of methods for lessening human encounters with coyotes, most notably to cut off their food supply. Humans providing food to the coyotes directly and indirectly is the number one reason the coyote population has exploded on Cape Ann, and at the top of the list states Pat is bird feeders. She recommends that if you do have a bird feeder, at the very least, clean up the mess left daily underneath the feeders. Spilled bird food attracts rodents and small mammals, which in turn attracts coyotes.

Unsecured garbage as well as pet food left outdoors are also strong coyote attractants.

From my own observation its easy to see why Cape Ann’s coyote population is mushrooming. Our shoreline, marshes, and wooded habitats provide a wealth of food, both hunted and scavenged. I am curious to know if our readers see dead fish and birds washed ashore any longer. In the past I have seen quite a bit more on daily walks and think today the coyotes are providing a service by eating the carcasses.

At the meeting it was suggested that coyotes eat rats. That information seems surprising as rats are highly intelligent and not easily hunted. Additionally, if coyotes are doing such a terrific job eating small mammals and rodents, then why do we have an exploding population of rabbits, chipmunks, and mice? Regrettably conjecture is often presented as fact and unfortunately there is no hard data available. We learned at the meeting that tagging and tracking coyotes is not allowed in Massachusetts under the same provision that does not allow for poisoning and trapping with snares.

Hunting as an approved option for reducing the coyote population was discussed. Local licensed hunter Sam Holmes was in attendance and he can be reached at 978-491-8746. Communities such as Middleton, Rhode Island, have an expanded hunting season to manage the population of specifically coyotes that have lost their fear of humans.

Pat’s Top Recommendations for Lessening Contact with Coyotes

  1. Put away bird feeders, or clean up daily beneath the feeder.
  2. Supervise pets outdoors at all times.
  3. Secure garbage in tight fitting bins and put out the morning of trash collection
  4. Seal up any areas of your home and outbuilding’s foundation that might provide a coyote with a place to hide.
  5. Secure chickens.
  6. Compost in bins.
  7. Under no circumstances, feed coyotes.

Note to the folks who are feeding the coyotes: By feeding the coyote, you are habituating it to people. You may thing you are helping the coyote but you may potentially hasten its demise. Habituated coyotes are considered a serious threat.

If you do come face to face with a coyote, be be big, bold, and brave. Waving and flailing your arms will make you look bigger and scarier, and yelling will startle them.

Coyotes typically do not want to interact with people. Each of the three times I have come face to face with a coyote it was because I was unwittingly between it and potential food. The big, bold, and brave technique is effective although during my most recent coyote encounter, I thought the coyote had departed. He had however instead stealthily circled around to the dead fish on the beach he so determinedly wanted to eat. Eastern Coyote massachusetts beach Canis latrans Kim Smith

Eastern Coyote

REMINDER: COYOTE FORUM TONIGHT AT CITY HALL

Tonight at 7pm the coyote forum will be held at Kyrouz Auditorium. The program sounds similar to the one presented last year at this time. If you plan to go, leave early because last year the auditorium was packed.

eastern-coyote-canis-latrans-massachusetts-kim-smith

Eastern Coyote, Loblolly Cove
Coyote scat ©Kim Smith 2016Coyote scat, Eastern Point
Coyote lair ©Kim Smith 2016Coyote lair, Brace Cove

COYOTE raiding garbage can left outside house. Rocky Mountains. (Canis latrans).

COYOTE raiding garbage can left outside house.
Rocky Mountains. (Canis latrans).

Coyote eating trash courtesy Google image search

COYOTE FORUM SCHEDULED FOR FEBRUARY 2nd FROM 7 TO 9PM

eastern-coyote-canis-latrans-massachusetts-kim-smithFROM THE MAYOR:

COYOTE FORUM SCHEDULED FOR FEBRUARY 2nd FROM 7 TO 9PM

Our city continues to discuss coyote conflicts with state partners, including Mass Environmental Police, Mass Division of Fisheries & Wildlife, and the Governor’s office, with direct conversations with the Lieutenant Governor. In addition to the on-going research by ad-hoc groups, our newly formed Animal Advisory Board will provide new insights (we need new members on this board, so please consider applying). Lastly, we are setting up a meeting tentative for Thursday, Feb 2nd from 7PM to 9PM at City Hall to host another informal coyote forum with information from state environmental partners, animal control, and time for questions and answers, too. We will continue to press our state leaders for safe and swift solutions and additional police and animal patrols remain on alert across Gloucester. Please see the link from Mass.gov on helpful tips and resolving conflicts (which includes law stating, “Coyotes taking pets are not considered an immediate threat to human safety, therefore ACO’s and municipal police departments are not authorized to remove these wild animals.”) We will provide more updates as they develop. Thank you.

 

 

YES, EASTERN COYOTES ARE HYBRIDS, BUT THE ‘COYWOLF’ IS NOT A THING

Talk of “coywolves” – a blend of coyote and wolf – is everywhere. There is a PBS special called “Meet the Coywolf,” a recent article in the Economist, and it is now trending on Facebook. The media really love this new animal name.

There is no doubt that there is a hybrid canid living in the eastern US, and that it is the result of an amazing evolution story unfolding right underneath our noses.

However, this is not a new species – at least not yet – and I don’t think we should start calling it a “coywolf.”

Genetic swapping

What creature are we talking about? In the last century, a predator – I prefer the name “eastern coyote” – has colonized the forests of eastern North America, from Florida to Labrador.

New genetic tests show that all eastern coyotes are actually a mix of three species: coyote, wolf and dog. The percentages vary, dependent upon exactly which test is applied and the geographic location of the canine.

Coyotes in the Northeast are mostly (60%-84%) coyote, with lesser amounts of wolf (8%-25%) and dog (8%-11%). Start moving south or east and this mixture slowly changes. Virginia animals average more dog than wolf (85%:2%:13% coyote:wolf:dog) while coyotes from the Deep South had just a dash of wolf and dog genes mixed in (91%:4%:5% coyote:wolf:dog). Tests show that there are no animals that are just coyote and wolf (that is, a coywolf), and some eastern coyotes that have almost no wolf at all.

In other words, there is no single new genetic entity that should be considered a unique species. Instead, we are finding a large intermixing population of coyotes across the continent, with a smattering of noncoyote DNA mixed in to varying degrees along the eastern edge. The coywolf is not a thing.

All eastern coyotes show some evidence of past hybridization, but there is no sign that they are still actively mating with dogs or wolves. The coyote, wolf and dog are three separate species that would very much prefer not to breed with each other. However, biologically speaking, they are similar enough that interbreeding is possible.

This genetic swapping has happened more than once in their history; one study showed that the gene for black coat color found in North American wolves and coyotes today (but not in Old World wolves) originated in dogs brought to the continent by the earliest Native Americans. Some prehistoric hybridization event transferred the dog gene into wild wolves and coyotes.

The eastern coyote is born

We can estimate the date of the most recent hybridization events that created eastern coyotes by analyzing their genetic structure. Their DNA show that about 100 years ago, coyotes mated with wolves, and about 50 years ago with dogs. A century ago, wolf populations in the Great Lakes were at their nadir, living at such low density that some reproductive animals probably couldn’t find another wolf mate, and had to settle with a coyote.

The more recent date for the dog hybridization likely results from a cross-species breeding event at the very leading edge of the wave of colonizing coyotes in the east, possibly after a few females first spanned the St Lawrence seaway into upstate New York, where they would have encountered abundant feral dogs, but no other coyotes.

Nowadays, eastern coyotes have no problem finding a coyote mate. Their populations continue to grow throughout their new forested range, and they seem more likely to kill a dog than breed with it. Wolf populations in the Great Lakes have also recovered, and the wolf is once again the worst enemy of the coyote, rather than its last-chance prom date.

Coyotes have also expanded north into Alaska, although there is no sign of hybridization in that range extension. In Central America, they have expanded out of Mexico’s deserts, working their way south past the Panama Canal in the last decade, apparently bound for South America.

No genetic studies have looked at Central American coyotes, but photographs of doglike animals suggest that coyotes might be mixing it up across species lines along the leading edge of this southward expansion as well.

Coywolfdog evolution

Hybridization across species is a natural evolutionary phenomenon. The old notion that an inability to breed should define what a species is has been abandoned by zoologists (with a resounding “I told you so” from botanists). Even modern humans are hybrids, with traces of Neanderthal and Denisovan genes mixed into our genome.

The first requirement for evolution is variation, and mixing genes from two species creates all sorts of new variations for evolution to act on. Most of these probably die, being a compromise between two longstanding species that were already well-adapted to their own niches.

However, in today’s rapidly changing world, new variations might actually do better than the old types. Some of these genetic mixes will survive better than others – this is natural selection.

The coyote with a bit of wolf genes to make it slightly larger was probably better able to handle deer, which are overabundant in eastern forests, but still wily enough to live in a landscape full of people. These animals thrived, dispersed east and thrived again, becoming the eastern coyote.

Exactly which dog and wolf genes are surviving natural selection in today’s eastern coyote is an area of active research.

Coyotes with odd coat colors or hair types are probably the most conspicuous sign of dog genes in action, while their slightly larger size might come from wolf genes. Some of these genes will help an animal survive and breed; others will make them less fit. Natural selection is still sorting this out, and we are witnessing the evolution of a new type of coyote right under our noses, one that is very good at living there.

Western coyotes adapt locally to their environments, with limited gene flow between populations (called “ecotypes”) living in different habitats, presumably reflecting local specialization.

Will eastern coyotes specialize locally as well? How will dog and wolf genes sort out across cities and wildernesses of the east?

Expect some really cool science in the next few years as researchers use modern genetic tools to sniff out the details of this story.

Evolution still in progress

There are many examples of bad animal names that cause a lot of confusion.

The fisher is a large type of weasel that does not eat fish (it prefers porcupines). The mountain beaver of the Pacific Northwest is not a beaver and does not live in the mountains. And then there’s the sperm whale…

We don’t get many opportunities to name new animals in the 21st century. We shouldn’t let the media mess up this one by declaring it a new species called the coywolf. Yes, there are wolf genes in some populations, but there are also eastern coyotes with almost no wolf genes, and others that have as much dog mixed in as they do wolf. “Coywolf” is an inaccurate name that causes confusion.

The coyote has not evolved into a new species over the last century. Hybridization and expansion have created a host of new coyote variations in the east, and evolution is still sorting these out. Gene flow continues in all directions, keeping things mixed up, and leading to continual variation over their range, with no discrete boundaries.

Could evolution eventually lead to a coyote so specialized for eastern forests that they would be considered a unique species? Yes, but for this to happen, they would have to cut off gene flow with nonhybrid animals, leading to distinct types of coyotes that (almost) never interbreed. I think we are a long way from this possibility.

For now, we have the eastern coyote, an exciting new type of coyote in the midst of an amazing evolutionary transition. Call it a distinct “subspecies,” call it an “ecomorph,” or call it by its scientific name Canis latrans var. But don’t call it a new species, and please, don’t call it the coywolf.

Disclosure statement:

Roland Kays does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

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Following images and video courtesy google image search

Garbage, bird seed, and fallen fruit attract coyotes to your backyard.

COYOTE raiding garbage can left outside house. Rocky Mountains. (Canis latrans).

dsc08821

Coyotes: My Take 1/17/17

Here’s the thing. Back when I photographed my first interaction with local coyotes in the early days of the blog my stance was that coyotes are horrible and we might want to think about eradicating them (as if that’s even a possibility). Now 9 years later and living in East Gloucester where we routinely see them and hear them howling nightly. I’ve crossed paths with many coyotes since that time. They want nothing to do with us. You yell, they run. You wave your arms in the air, they really run. “Seven coyote bites recorded ever. This compares to the 4.7 million dog bites annually.” Source thelocalne.ws My stance officially changed when thinking about how much we would hear about coyote bites or deaths in the news because my line of thinking was that it would get seven day a week above the fold coverage if a person was killed by a coyote, and it just hasn’t happened. So my stance has completely changed in the past four years after realizing that while living in the heart of coyote territory in between the golf course and the seine fields that these creatures really want nothing to do with us humans unless we leave food out for them in the form of small pets. I’m sorry for the poor family that lost its pet.

The time when I nearly shit my pants coming face to face with a coyote on the Good harbor Foot Bridge-

Coyote at Good Harbor Beach 4:55AM 7/5/08

I was fumbling with my camera as I figured the coyote would take off and there would be very little time to take the picture. He did take off, and circled back to the footbridge where I snapped a lousy shot with the terrible light and the coyote moving around. Heart racing a bit making it difficult to hold the camera steady for the long exposure shot. I did my best though and this is what I came up with-

Face To Face With The Coyote On The Footbridge At Good Harbor

I nearly shit when I turned the corner on the footbridge and came face to face with the coyote.  Forgive my blurry, out of focus picture but my heart was beating a mile a minute and I wasn’t going to stick around to see what it was going to do next.  You can click the picture and select “all sizes” to see a bigger version of the shot.

Face To Face With The Coyote On The Footbridge At Good Harbor, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

Gloucester At Dawn Poor Dead Coyote On Moorland Road 4:50AM 5/22/10

This poor coyote must have gotten hit by a vehicle within the past few hours as the blood was still vibrant red.

RIP Mr Coyote.  Hope your life on the island was a good one.

There must have been quite an impact to make his eye bug out like that on one side of his head.

Coyote back to school Gloucester

Before loping through the parking lot and shifting right at the ‘parked bus game trail‘ and straight on to Cherry Street, our wildlife neighbor lingered in the skate park with us.

We were mostly still as..church mice. Did I think that? I slipped in front of three kids which is ridiculous because the kids are my size or bigger . And it was just passing by. Still, it did seem a long time before its distinctive gait resumed.

The photo is Blow Up style– from the point where we were standing comfortable enough to grab a phone shot of the coyote heading out rather than to the Ralph B O’Maley Innovation Middle School in Gloucester .

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COYOTE ON THE BEACH!

Eastern Coyote Canis latrans massachusetts Kim SmithFace to face

When out filming for projects, I’d often thought about what my reaction would be if ever again I came eye to eye with a coyote. Many have crossed my path, but too quickly and too unexpectedly to capture. I don’t bring my dog with me any longer because one brazen one had a go at her two winters ago and it’s just not a good idea to tempt fate. I hoped that calmness would prevail, allowing for a non-blurry photo, or two.

Well, I didn’t panic and got some great footage, and when the coyote was too far out of range for my movie camera, took a few snapshots.

Eastern Coyote massachusetts beach Canis latrans Kim Smith

This one appears smaller than what I have typically encountered, perhaps it is only a year or two old, or possibly coyotes are not as plump after the winter months. He/she was very intent upon scavenging in a bed of seaweed that had washed ashore and think it must have been quite hungry to allow me to get so close. He reluctantly left his meal as I moved toward him and then watched me for some time from under cover of beach grass. His shining eyes were easily seen in the fading low light. Mistakenly, I thought that was the end of our meeting and went back to filming B-roll.Eastern Coyote massachusetts Kim Smith

Beach grass provides excellent camouflage

I was losing the light and decided to call it a day. Packing up cameras and turning to go, there he was, a hundred yards away, staring at me. Deftly traveling through the tall reeds he had circled around. I don’t think he had me in mind for his next meal, but I was halfway between him and the scavanged dinner from which he had so rudely been interrupted. Plans on how to weaponize my tripod and camera bag quickly came to mind. He trotted leisurely towards me, changed his mind, and then trotted in the opposite direction. A car came down the road and he again turned toward my direction, making his way along the beach until slipping back into the grass.

If ever you have a close encounter with a coyote, be sure to remind yourself of this story and know that they may indeed still be very close by.

WHY THE EASTERN COYOTE IS NOT A COYWOLF AND CAPE ANN TV COYOTE MEETING COVERAGE

For additional reading, the following is a link to an interesting article that explains clearly why coyotes are thought to be the canid soup that they are, from Earth Sky: “Eastern Coyote is a Hybrid, But Coywolf is Not a Thing”

This map shows the movement of coyotes across North America and Mexico. It is now in Panama and will undoubtedly make its way south and across the canal. The animal is so adaptable I imagine it won’t be long before it colonizes Colombia as well.

figure_3_distribution-1

Link to Cape Ann TV coverage of the coyote meeting:

http://vp.telvue.com/preview?id=T01896&video=261352

 

COYOTE PHOTOS FROM EAST GLOUCESTER AND COYOTE MEETING RECAP

FullSizeRender (13)Councilor Steven LeBlanc ©Kim Smith 2016

City Councilor Steven LeBlanc

On Monday night at City Hall a packed audience attended the “Living with Wildlife” coyote meeting. Recognizing the exploding population of coyotes on Cape Ann, City Councilor Steven LeBlanc had requested the forum. Approximately 250 people were in attendance, which is an unusually large number for a meeting of this nature and speaks to the general concern by Cape Ann residents to the growing number of coyotes now living amongst us.

pat Huckery ©Kim Smith 2016Pat Huckery 

The informational meeting was conducted by Pat Huckery, the northeast district manager for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and she is herself a wildlife biologist. Pat presented the life history of the coyote as well as a number of methods for lessening human encounters with coyotes, most notably to cut off their food supply. Humans providing food to the coyotes directly and indirectly is the number one culprit and at the top of the list states Pat is bird feeders. She recommends that if you do have a bird feeder, at the very least, clean up the daily mess underneath the feeders. Spilled bird food attracts rodents and small mammals, which in turn attracts coyotes. Unsecured garbage as well as pet food left outdoors are also strong coyote attractants.

The very specific and unique ecology of Cape Ann, in relation to the coyote, was not discussed. Cape Ann’s coyote population has mushroomed in part due to the wealth of food that can be scavenged along our shoreline, marshes, and wooded habitats. One East Gloucester resident attending the meeting reported that she lives with a pack of twenty in her backyard. Hunting as an approved option for reducing the coyote population was discussed and is also believed to help create a healthy fear of humans on the part of the coyote. Local licensed hunter Sam Holmes was in attendance and he can be reached at 978-491-8746. Communities such as Middleton, Rhode Island, have an expanded hunting season to manage the population of specifically coyotes that have lost their fear of humans. Pat also debunked the highly romanticized term coywolf, and disputes the concept that by hunting coyotes, the reverse occurs and the overall population increases.

IMG_0273These photos were taken by Pat Halverson and submitted by Peggy Matlow, our new Good Morning Gloucester FOB . Peggy and her family will soon be permanently relocating to Gloucester, from the Berkshires, and these photos were taken from their new home in East Gloucester.

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BREAKING NEWS: EASTERN POINT WOMAN ATTACKED BY COYOTE

BREAKING NEWS: EASTERN POINT WOMAN ATTACKED BY COYOTE

An Eastern Point resident was attacked by a coyote at 5:15 this morning. She was curled up in an Adirondack chair drinking coffee and watching the stars before heading off to work. The wolf-size coyote leapt on her back. She jumped to her feet and fought it back with her fists. She next grabbed a broom and in the process hit her truck’s key fob, which sounded the alarm. The coyote slunk back into the brush and observed her as she threw rocks at it and yelled loudly, to no avail. It stayed for some time watching her. The coyote could be rabid.

The woman describes the coyote’s drool as smelling like foul meat and the fur as coarse and bristly. The drool was in her hair and took some time to wash out the smell. She does not inherently dislike coyotes and is an animal lover by nature, owns many pets and chickens, and was the former owner of a horse stable. There are several fences around her family’s property, in place to keep her pets safe, including an electric fence.

The woman called the police, who informed her that the animal control officer was not in. She has not heard from animal control.

The Coyote Controversy Continues

Coyote Massachusetts,canis latrans ©Kim Smith 2014

Joey forwarded the following information and links from an editorial that was recently posted on “North Shore Nature News.” We’ll post the first several paragraphs from the editorial, and the comment from Jim Schmidt that Joey found particularly interesting. In fairness to the author, the See More, directs the reader back to the original editorial.

“In Nancy Gurney’s classic children’s book, “The King, the Mice and the Cheese,” a king brings in cats to get rid of the mice eating his cheese. He then brings in dogs to get rid of the cats. Lions to get rid of the dogs. Elephants to get rid of the lions. And, finally, mice to get rid of the elephants.We find ourselves in similar straights with the eastern coyote.

Wolves once occupied the top of the area’s food chain. But we hunted them into near extinction. So, with no wolves in the area, coyotes began to enter the commonwealth in the 1950s as the food chain’s top dog. DNA evidence shows the coyotes mated with what was left of the wolves and with dogs. The cross breeding created the eastern coyote, a larger version of what wildlife experts now call the western coyote.
The coyote is bolder and more adaptable than the shier, more reclusive wolf. So, instead of confining itself to rural areas, as the wolf once did, the coyotes occupy rural, suburban and urban habitats. Add the fact that Massachusetts loses an estimated 40 acres a day of rural land to development and it’s inevitable the human and the coyote worlds will collide.” – See more at: Ipswich Wicked Local

 

Comment from Jim Schmidt:

“I have 54 years of first hand and face to face experience with coyotes. I retired as a fulltime USDA government coyote specialist recently. I have dealt with coyotes in New York, South Carolina, Kansas, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. Many remarks in this editorial are very incorrect. Coyote are dangerous wild predators. They are smart, problem solving, professional killers. They kill and eat everything too.

They DO NOT have to be rabid to be dangerous. Look up the “Biting Coyote of Green Valley, Arizona” as an example. This unprovoked coyote attacked and bit 8 adult people. The media and local medical professionals claimed it “must be Rabid” and it was not. How do I know? I was the one that removed him. Coyotes have a very low history of rabies too. I know first hand that coyotes will attack any size animal if it wishes. Three coyotes attacked and killed a large Rottweiler dog while the owner was walking it and another large dog. They killed and ate it-I was there again.

How do they kill a horse you ask? They will run it until it over heats and stops and often lies down and they take them. I have seen it again. They stand at the rear of a cow or horse giving birth and attack and kill the newborn when it hits the ground. Goats, sheep, chickens, cats, apples, water melons, garden hoses, and much more are at risk all the time…basically nothing is safe from the clever coyote. This dangerous animal will never be on welfare as it can take care of itself better than anything I know of or experienced.

I encourage you to learn the truth about coyotes not fantasies. They are a marvel of nature and they are in your state and community now. This is a professional dangerous killer for sure.” Jim Schmidt – See more at: Ipswich Wicked Local

 

Chickity Check It!- Kristy Asaro’s Coyote Photos From Her Parents’ Back Porch In East #GloucesterMA

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Check Out Way More Photos Of The Coyote Up Close And Personal (Click On The Photos On Her Site For The Larger Sized Versions)and Subscribe to Kristy’s Blog Here- http://www.imaginekristy.com/w2/coyote/

Sorry Paul, but Coywolfs, Wolfoties, Coyotes Do Not Shit in the Woods

coyotes do not shit in the woods

Well I’m sure they sometimes do, but on my morning walks along East Main Street and Eastern Point I quite often see coyote poop in the middle of the road. I always wonder what that is about. I agree that most wild animals do their doo in the woods, which is natural for them to do. Does anyone have any thoughts on why the coyotes seem to prefer the middle of the road? I think they do it to spite us – sort of a coyote’s way of saying: “FU humans for taking over and destroying my habitat and then trying to run me away when I eat your tasty little cats and dogs that you leave out unattended as easy prey.” Or maybe they’re saying: “If you humans are going to mess up my bathroom with your dog poop in plastic bags, I’ll just go out here in the road.” What do you think it means, if anything?

Any Scat Experts Out There?

coyote scat in the road

I’m actually pretty sure it is coyote scat. I have been coming across these piles recently (pretty large dog poop size piles) in the road and on the sidewalks along Eastern Point. At first I thought they were left behind by very inconsiderate dog owners, but then started seeing them out in the road, where I can’t imagine any conscientious dog owner would allow their dog to do their do. If you look close, you can see berries or something in there that I don’t think of as typical dog diet stuff. Anyone have any other ideas?

E.J. Lefavour
http://www.hobbithousestudio.com

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