Tag Archives: coyote attack

(EDITED) GLOUCESTER POODLE MAULED AND KILLED BY COYOTE WHILE WOMEN FORCED TO TAKE REFUGE IN CAR

Editor’s note: Please keep comments civil. Thank you.

eastern-coyote-canis-latrans-massachusetts-kim-smithimg_4034Councilman Scott Memhard shares photo of the porch where the poddle was killed

AS reported in thelocalnews.ws

Sumac Lane, Rocky Neck

GLOUCESTER — The mayor and police chief are advising residents to keep a careful watch on all pets after a resident’s dog was killed by a coyote last night.

Two women who tried to save the dog were forced to hide in a car after the coyote turned on them.

Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken and Interim Chief John McCarthy issued the advice after the dog was attacked last night (January 15).

At around 9:30 p.m., “Gloucester Animal Control responded to Sumac Lane for reports of a resident whose dog had been attacked and killed by a coyote,” a police statement said.

“The dog was on a fixed leash in the yard while its owner was inside the home. Animal control officers searched the surrounding area but did not find the coyote,” it added.

Rocky Neck resident Mark Olsen told WBZ TV the dog, a poodle, belonged to his 75-year-old mother.

The dog was out for about five minutes when the coyote attacked, he told reporters.

Olsen said his mother and sister “tried to save the dog, but they had to hide in their car when the coyote came after them,” WBZ said.

As a result, animal control officers and Gloucester Environmental Police are monitoring the entire Rocky Neck area today.

City officials said the coyote population has been increasing on Cape Ann recently. Olsen agreed, saying he had seen three or four recently. He also said they are becoming “more brazen.”

The Boston Globe reported last year that 250 residents attended a meeting last year to voice concern about the increasing coyote population.

In October 2015, a woman drinking coffee on her front porch was attacked by a coyote, according to Good Morning Gloucester.

To prevent coyote attacks, Gloucester Police advise residents to follow safety tips from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife:

  1. Do not approach, feed, pet, or try to interact with wildlife, including coyotes, foxes, or other wild animals.
  2. It is always a good idea to leash pets at all times if outdoors. Small cats and dogs are seen as prey and larger dogs competition.
  3. Don’t hesitate to scare or threaten coyotes with loud noises, bright lights, or water sprayed from a hose.
  4. Cut back bushy edges, as these areas provide cover for coyotes and their prey.
  5. Secure your garbage. Coyotes raid open trash materials and compost piles. Secure your garbage in tough plastic containers with tight-fitting lids and keep them in secure buildings when possible.
  6. Take out trash when the morning pick-up is scheduled, not the previous night.
  7. Keep compost in secure, vented containers, and keep barbecue grills clean to reduce attractive odors.
  8. Keep bird feeder areas clean. Use feeders designed to keep seed off the ground, as the seed attracts many small mammals coyotes prey upon.
  9. Remove feeders if coyotes are regularly seen around your yard.

More information regarding the city’s increasing coyote population will be released on the City of Gloucester website this week.

Anyone who sees a coyote in Gloucester should immediately contact Gloucester Animal Control at 978-281-9746.eastern-coyote-massachusetts-kim-smith

 

GloucesterCast 154 With Guests @KimSmithDesigns, @Donnaard, Big Tony, Toby Pett and Host @Joey_C Taped 10/11/15

GloucesterCastSquareGloucesterCast 154 With Guests @KimSmithDesigns, @Donnaard, Big Tony, Toby Pett and Host @Joey_C Taped 10/11/15

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BREAKING NEWS: EASTERN POINT WOMAN ATTACKED BY COYOTE

BREAKING NEWS: EASTERN POINT WOMAN ATTACKED BY COYOTE

An Eastern Point resident was attacked by a coyote at 5:15 this morning. She was curled up in an Adirondack chair drinking coffee and watching the stars before heading off to work. The wolf-size coyote leapt on her back. She jumped to her feet and fought it back with her fists. She next grabbed a broom and in the process hit her truck’s key fob, which sounded the alarm. The coyote slunk back into the brush and observed her as she threw rocks at it and yelled loudly, to no avail. It stayed for some time watching her. The coyote could be rabid.

The woman describes the coyote’s drool as smelling like foul meat and the fur as coarse and bristly. The drool was in her hair and took some time to wash out the smell. She does not inherently dislike coyotes and is an animal lover by nature, owns many pets and chickens, and was the former owner of a horse stable. There are several fences around her family’s property, in place to keep her pets safe, including an electric fence.

The woman called the police, who informed her that the animal control officer was not in. She has not heard from animal control.

Coyote Attack Downtown Gloucester

Joey,
Awhile back I read a GMG blog post about a coyote attacking a cat.
I was happy to hear that the cat survived and didn’t think too much
about coyote attacks until today.
Sadly our beloved cat Daisy was attacked and killed by a coyote early
this morning. We live downtown in a totally populated and NOT wild
part of Gloucester. The coyote cornered our cat on our neighbor’s
porch. There was a ruckus as deck furniture was upset during the
struggle.
If I had known about coyotes in downtown Gloucester I would have kept
my cat in always. I hope the news of Daisy’s death will warn other
downtown folks and save at least one pet’s life.
Sincerely,
Jane Cunningham

Update on Cosmos

My deepest thanks to everyone who has written with their kind concern for Cosmos. He’s not doing so great today, but he is one tough little kitty. And to everyone who read the story in the Herald and called with well-wishes–thank you–I guess the Herald reads GMG, too. Link to Herald Death-cheating Kitty Survives Second Attack

The Warrior: Surviving Coyote Attack #2

Last night outside my office window I heard that horrid screaming-yelping noise unique to coyotes. I leapt up and ran hollering and flailing my arms wildly toward the ruckus, not knowing, but hoping, the coyote would be so terrified he would drop whatever was in its clutches. The coyote’s jaws were wrapped around my cat’s head. I came within a foot and finally he released him. The coyote tore up the street as Cosmos ran in the opposite direction toward the wooded lot next to our home. We spent the next several hours searching for him when at long last he appeared dazed and disoriented at the back kitchen door.

He stayed in my lap all night, disappeared briefly again this morning, and then we headed over to North Shore Veterinarian Hosptilal. You could see the two teeth holes near his eye and on top of the skull and Dr. Heaney showed me where the bottom row of the coyote’s teeth had punctured his jaw. He will survive and will hopefully not lose his eyesight or have a brain injury. Doctor Heaney has been out pets’ vet forever–and we love her and the staff at the North Shore Veterinarian Hospital–it was she who stitched Cosmos up from coyote encounter #1, when his belly was ripped open, from the tip of his throat to the top of his pelvis.

Our Cosmos has survived two coyote attacks, near death from ingesting my neighbor’s rat poison, and  twelve hours trapped in a lobster pot during a winter storm.

Why would a coyote want a skinny old man cat like ours, without a lick of meat on his bones. They must be very, very hungry. Once they know of an animal, they will pursue it relentlessly. In my discussion with Dr. Heaney about coyote attackes in general, she said that the state agencies don’t even acknowledge that coyotes are killing cats. Why do we all have to live in terror over our pet’s safety. There has to be a solution. Everyone on our street, and the next, and all over Cape Ann, and Massachusetts have lost beloved pets– cats, dogs, chickens, and more. I think the problem is out of control. I’d like to know of any GMG reader’s experience with contacting local, regional or state agencies in regard to coyote attacks.