Tag Archives: Cape Ann Museum

FRIENDS! DON’T MISS JOHN SLOAN GLOUCESTER DAYS AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

FRIENDS! DON’T MISS JOHN SLOAN GLOUCESTER DAYS AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

(Delaware)OurRedCottage,Lilacs[1]Red Cottage is located on East Main Street, across from the entrance to Rocky Neck, and is still painted red!

Beautifully curated by Martha Oaks, from museums around the nation, the exhibit comprises a stellar collection of canvases painted by John Sloan (1871-1951) during the five summers he spent on Cape Ann. I know how much everyone enjoys Hopper’s Houses and it is a joy to see scenes of our community expressed through the eye and brush strokes of Sloan, one of our country’s most celebrated early 20th century painters, and a leader in the Ash Can School of painting.

As was I, you will be thoroughly delighted by the approximately three dozen paintings of our neighborhood, scenes of Gloucester’s Main Street, Rocky Neck sunflowers, the former US government fish hatchery on Ten Pound Island, the trolley along East Main Street, fashions and sentiments of the period, and a wealth more of Gloucester captured in the midst of everyday life during the transitional years of the first World War.

Image: John Sloan (1871-1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. [2008.14]

“A Landscape is a Portrait of Place” ~ Sunflowers by John Sloan

Of the approximately 1200 canvases painted by Sloan, 300 are of Cape Ann. One of my favorites of the favorites is Red Cottage, summer home to he and his wife Dolly during the artist’s highly productive Cape Ann years.

Sloan - Our Red Cottage

Red Cottage and Daniel Gill Fisherman House, Built 1847

John Sloan Red Cottage Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015

I’ll return to take a photo of Red Cottage in prettier light, rather than today’s sunny high noon skies.

John Sloan Gloucester Days runs through the end of November. The last lecture in the series of three, Passing through Gloucester: John Sloan between City and Country will be presented by Michael Lobel on Friday October 30th. For more information visit the Cape Ann Museum website.

Credits:

Our Red Cottage, Lilacs, 1917 Oil on canvas. Delaware Art Museum. Gift of Helen Farr Sloan, 2000. © 2015 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

John Sloan (1871–1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. ©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

John Sloan (1871–1951), Our Red Cottage, 1916. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. ©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

 

CAM Connections Third Tuesdays

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to welcome older adults and their care partners to CAM Connections, on Tuesday,  October  20 from10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.. This program meets on the third Tuesday of every month and is free and open to the public. Reservations are required – to make a reservation or for more information please call Kate LaChance at (978)283-0455 x12 or email katelachance@capeannmuseum.org.
The Cape Ann Museum CAM Connections Third Tuesdays program brings art, culture and history to underserved seniors in the Cape Ann community. The program offers personal engagement with the Museum collection through small group art conversations. The heart of the program is to create space for a meaningful experience in the welcoming environment of the Museum, where participants can share responses and reflections as well as form new social connections. Individuals with memory challenges and their care partners are warmly welcomed.

Third Tuesdays offers seniors the experience of slowing down and becoming still to look closely at art with others. During small group conversation, participants view paintings, objects and artifacts in an open-ended discussion format, stimulating personal curiosities and stories, while having fun, growing and learning together.

The Cape Ann Museum, a regional center of local art, history and culture, has a treasured collection that resonates with the personal and collective history of seniors with ties to the region. Committed to improving the lives of seniors, CAM Connections values the arts as healing and believes active engagement with the arts offers needed connection, reduces isolation and promotes health and well being. Past participants have witnessed the many ways the Museum’s unique collection offers a bridge to a meaningful and enriching life experience.

Dogtown Days

Join the Friends of Dogtown to kick off a weekend celebrating Dogtown!

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, in collaboration with the Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library, a day dedicated to all things Dogtown on Saturday, October 17 from 1:00p.m. to 3:00p.m. Hear from expert panelists on topics ranging from artists inspired by Dogtown to the geology of Dogtown and everything in between. This program is free and open to the public. For more information, please email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10.

unnamed-1Whale’s Jaw, Dogtown. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library & Archives.

Dogtown Days is a celebration of the art, history, archaeology, geology, ecology and mystery of Dogtown, from the remains of its colonial settlement to its treasures along the trails through the watershed land and glacial heaths that lie at the heart of Cape Ann. Its 3,000 acres serve as the inspiration for Saturday’s panelists: Mark Carlotto, Mary Ellen Lepionka, Ed Becker, Chris Leahy, Ted Tarr, Noel Mann, Shep Abbott and Tom Halsted. Join these Friends of Dogtown as they explore the cellars of Dogtown, the Native Americans who lived there and the many insects and birds that call the habitats of Dogtown their home.

Following the Dogtown expert panel discussion, the Friends of Dogtown invite all audience members to join them for a reception with cake and ale in the Friend Room at the Sawyer Free Library nearby.

 

One-Day Art Installation at Historic White-Ellery House – Oct. 3

Insights On Site at the White-Ellery House

Life Observed – A one-day installation by Sarah Wonson

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Life Observed, an installation by Sarah Wonson on Saturday, October 3 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This program will take place at the Cape Ann Museum’s historic White-Ellery House (1710) and is free and open to the public as part of Escapes North 17th Century Saturdays. The House is located at 245 Washington Street in Gloucester at the Route 128 Grant Circle Rotary; parking is available off Poplar Street in the field behind the house.

unnamed-4Sarah Wonson, White-Ellery, 2014, woodblock print.

In Life Observed, Wonson’s interests in making art converge with her reverence for Colonial-period architecture. Returning home to Gloucester in 2011 after living away for eight years, Wonson began to take notice of the wealth of beautiful colonial-era homes around Cape Ann; each one with its own character, friendly, foreboding, comical, etc. “I wanted to learn more about Colonial period buildings,” states Wonson, “so I began visual research in The White Pine Series of Architectural Monographs.” These pamphlets, filled with atmospheric, shadowy black and white photographs of historic houses, captivated Wonson, and she has been drawing and contemplating them since. “[While] the formal aspects of the structures interested me initially, over time my focus has shifted towards the relationship between where we dwell and the human imprint we leave behind. The home is not just a building, it is a place where we store our experience.”

 

Last year, for a woodblock printing project called BIG INK, Wonson photographed the newly renovated diamond-paned windows at the White-Ellery House. “The White-Ellery [H]ouse fascinated me; the dark sturdy exterior, the visible construction and layers of ornamentation left behind on the walls, paint and wallpaper still evident from long ago … carpenter marks on the attic beams, evidence of a human hand long gone. [The] House … is empty, yet it feels full of experience.”  Having finished the woodblocks, she decided to work toward putting a show together at the White-Ellery. The result is a series of three dimensional representations of household objects that comment on the contemporary relationship of the home and the world at large. “Over time, the link between home, object and their utilities has been degraded.… When everything is disposable, when there is always another, why should we care about what we have?”

The White-Ellery House has served as the backdrop for a series of one-day contemporary art installations (Insights On Site) for seven years running. It was built in 1710 and is one of just a handful of First Period houses in Eastern Massachusetts that survives to this day. Unlike other structures of this period, the largely unfurnished house has had very few interior alterations over the years. Stepping inside today, visitors enter much the same house they would have 300 years ago.

6th Annual Charles Olson Lecture: Michael McClure

Lecture and Readings by Michael McClure

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, in collaboration with the Gloucester Writers Center and Charles Olson Society, author Michael McClure as this year’s Charles Olson Annual lecturer. The 6th annual lecture will be held Saturday, October 3 at 1:00p.m.This program is free and open to the public. A book singing will follow. McClure’s book can be purchased at The Bookstore of Gloucester. For more information please email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10.

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In 1954, poet Robert Duncan introduced Michael McClure to poet Charles Olson’s influential manifesto,Projective Verse. McClure’s lecture, entitledThe Greatness of Olson will include a discussion about his relationship to Olson, as well as readings from McClure’s most recent work.

 

 

Three Visions of Gloucester

Peter Vincent, Jeff Weaver and Don Gorvett in a new show at the Cape Ann Museum

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to announce the opening of their latest exhibition, Vincent, Weaver, Gorvett: Gloucester, Three Visions on Saturday, October 24 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. The opening reception is free and open to the public. The exhibition will remain on view through February 28, 2016.
unnamed-3Peter Vincent (1947–2012), Howard Blackburn [detail] (undated), egg tempera on board, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold White, 1993 [Acc. #2887]; Jeff Weaver, Pavilion Beach [detail] (2006), oil on canvas, gift of the artist, 2008 [Acc. #2008-25]; Don Gorvett, Gloucester Reveries [detail] (1996), woodblock reduction print, 9 of 12, gift of the artist, 1996 [Acc. #1996.32].

During the early 1970s, the lives of Weaver, Gorvett and Vincent converged in Gloucester. They had each studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and for a time, Don Gorvett and Jeff Weaver shared studio space in an apartment building on the Fort; Peter, who lived in Rockport, was a frequent visitor. For each artist, Gloucester’s hardscrabble working waterfront was the attraction. Struggling to recover from the ravages of urban renewal, while at the same time weathering the slow steady demise of the city’s fishing industry, Gloucester Harbor in the early 1970s was a gold mine for the three artists.

Today, Jeff Weaver maintains a studio in Gloucester. After painting signs and murals in the 1990s, he turned his focus to watercolor and oil. Jeff can frequently be seen around town, brush and palette in hand, looking to capture the particular flavor of the city he calls home. Don Gorvett currently lives and works in Portsmouth, NH, having maintained a studio in Gloucester for many years. Don excels at the exacting art of reduction wood block printing and is a dedicated teacher. Peter Vincent, who passed away in 2012, secured a solid reputation as one of New England’s most well regarded marine artists. In 1986 he was honored with the coveted Mystic Invitational Award for excellence in painting.

Related Programs
Saturday, November 7 at 9:30 a.m.
The Art & Life of Peter Vincent: A Gallery Talk with Eoin Vincent

Saturday, November 14 at 9:30 a.m.
Jeff Weaver Gallery Talk

Saturday, December 19 at 10:00 a.m.
Don Gorvett Gallery Talk

Saturday, January 23 at 2:00 p.m.
A Conversation with Eoin Vincent, Jeff Weaver and Don Gorvett

These programs are free for Museum members / $10 nonmembers (includes admission). Space is limited, reservations required: (978) 283-0455 x10 or info@capeannmuseum.org. Updates and details at capeannmuseum.org.

Artist Talk with Copley Society of Art’s Abby Lammers at the Cape Ann Museum

Join Abby Lammers, recipient of the 2015 Charles Family Cape Ann Residency.

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (September 12, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, in partnership with the Copley Society of Art (CoSo), an artist talk with this year’s artist-in-residence, Abby Lammers on Sunday, September 20 at 2:00p.m. in the auditorium. This program is free for CoSo and CAM members or with admission to the Museum. The residency was created by the Charles Family Foundation as a dedication to and promotion of the North Shore and Boston art communities. For more information email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10.

Lammers will discuss her development as an artist with a love of design. She will present her process and touch upon her influences in color and composition. Examples of finished works and sketchbooks will be on display.

http://www.abbylammers.com/uploads/1/3/5/1/13512065/674848.jpg“I try to portray a unique vision of my subjects, so that everyday life becomes a little less invisible.”

Abby Lammers, is a native of Missouri and works full time as an artist from her studios in East Falmouth, MA and Rochester, NY. Her work has been featured in numerous group and solo shows at museums, galleries and cultural centers throughout the United States.  In her seventeen year career her accomplishments include acceptance into over 196 national exhibitions and winning over 62 awards.

http://www.abbylammers.com/

New public art: LOOK UP downtown! Ken Riaf’s Pleasant & Main ARTISPHERE sign, last chance to see group show at Trident, wall mural on Parsons HarborWalk

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi Joey,

Look up downtown if you haven’t yet seen the wonderful Pleasant & Main ARTISPHERE sign designed and project-boosted by artist and dealer, Ken Riaf. Then head on into his Jeffrey Marshall exhibit Law & Water Gallery.

I bet you’ve seen that Ed Touchette painting catching your eye through Trident’s window—last days to see the group exhibit at Trident Gallery. Just one week away from Ed Touchette’s solo exhibit at Trident. East Gloucester and Veterans School parents please get ready to bring your kids to see his exhibit. East Gloucester kids can find an Mr. Touchette throwback tucked away on East Main. Here’s a snapshot – try and find it.

Pass through Parsons down to Rogers or up to Main to see the progress of the artists of Art Haven/Hive. Their wall mural along a private building of Parsons Street is coming along and their depiction of Man at the Wheel is filling in…check it out! We have cleaned and scrubbed out graffiti on many walls, more than once, and are happy to see new public art added alongside the temporary FISH NET street mural and Dress Code’s.

I’m not sure what artist, Bob Stephenson, would have thought of the latest mural, but I wish he could have seen it. I do know he liked the Calderwood Fish Net mural and was grateful to have the graffiti painted out, the lights installed and anytime we swept and weeded.

Special thanks this week to the folks with Dan Leaman Landscaping and Maintenance Corp for extra clean up and weeding along Parsons Street.

Guided Walking Tours Offered by Cape Ann Museum

Explore downtown Gloucester through the historic lens of maritime painter Fitz Henry Lane

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (September 11, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Fitz Henry Lane’s Gloucester, a guided walking tour, on Saturday,  September 26 at 10:00 a.m. Explore downtown Gloucester and discover what it was like in the 19th century when Fitz Henry Lane roamed the streets and painted the views. Tours last about one and a half hours and are held rain or shine. Participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. Cost is $10 for Cape Ann Museum members; $20 for nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x10 for more information or to reserve a space.

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Fitz Henry Lane was a Cape Ann artist, printmaker and world-renowned American marine painter. With his subtle use of gleaming light, Lane is generally regarded as one of the finest 19th century practitioners of the style known as luminism. The Cape Ann Museum’s unparalleled collection of works by Fitz Henry Lane – which includes paintings, drawings and lithographs – is on permanent display in the gorgeously renovated Lane Gallery, a space fully devoted to Lane’s life and work.

Image credit: Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865). Gloucester Harbor at Sunrise, c. 1850, oil on canvas. Gift of Lawrence Brooks, 1970. [Acc. #2020]

Trails and Sails at the Cape Ann Museum

Hopper’s Houses – A Guided Walking Tour

A tour in downtown Gloucester to view houses immortalized by renowned American realist painter Edward Hopper.
image002The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, in tandem with The Essex National Heritage Commission’s Trails & Sails Weekend of Walks and Water, a guided walking tour of select Gloucester houses made famous by American realist painter Edward Hopper on Saturday, September 19 at 10:00 a.m. Tours last about 1 ½ hours and are held rain or shine; participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. The tour, along with Museum admission, is offered at no charge on a first come, first served basis. Space is limited, no reservations. For additional information please email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10 during Museum hours.

American realist painter Edward Hopper is known to have painted in Gloucester on five separate occasions during the summer months between 1912 and 1928. His earliest visit was made in the company of fellow artist Leon Kroll. During his second visit to Cape Ann in 1923, Hopper courted the young artist Josephine Nivison. He also began working in watercolor, capturing the local landscape and architecture in loosely rendered, light filled paintings. In 1924, Hopper and Nivison who were newly married returned to Gloucester on an extended honeymoon and continued to explore the area by foot and streetcar. During his final two visits to the area, in 1926 and 1928, Hopper produced some of his finest paintings. This special walking tour will explore the neighborhood surrounding the Museum, which includes many of the Gloucester houses immortalized by Hopper’s paintings.

Image credit: Edward Hopper, American, 1882-1967. Universalist Church, 1926. Watercolor over graphite on cream wove paper, 35.6 x 50.8 cm. (14 x 20 in.). Princeton University Art Museum. Laura P. Hall Memorial Collection, bequest of Professor Clifton R. Hall x1946-268. Photo: Bruce M. White.

Gloucester’s Middle Street – Guided walking tour offers historic perspective

An ever evolving neighborhood

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Historic Middle Street, a guided walking tour of one of Gloucester’s many historically rich streets, on Saturday, August 29 at 10:00 a.m. The tour meets at the Cape Ann Museum at 27 Pleasant Street and lasts about 1 1/2 hours. Tours are held rain or shine. Cost is $10 for Museum members; $20 nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited, reservations required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call(978) 283-0455, x16 for more information or to reserve a spot. Additional walking tours are offered through the end of September – please visitcapeannmuseum.org/events to find out more.

unnamed-4Image credit: The Saunders House, now part of the Sawyer Free Library, in the early 1880s. Photo by Edward Corliss & J. F. Ryan House Photographs, c. 1882-85. 4″ x 6″ cabinet cards. From the collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library and Archives.

Did you know that a resident of Middle Street, Gloucester, saved the town from a British attack by sea during the Revolution? Or that a leading feminist and religious free thinker lived halfway down Middle Street? Or, that the 1764 Saunders House that forms part of the Sawyer Free Library has undergone at least three radical architectural changes including a massive Victorian tower? Four centuries of Gloucester’s social, economic, and architectural history are packed into this one short street in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Join us for a docent-led tour of an ever-evolving neighborhood where you will see surviving evidence of the past and will learn about structures and people now gone.

Opening Hidden Doors: The Unifying Power of Art

Third Tuesdays Program Reconnects Older Adults to Art and Their Community

The Cape Ann Museum announces the beginning of a unique new program, CAM Connections Third Tuesdays, which brings Cape Ann art, culture and history to older adults in the local community, and invites individuals with memory challenges and their care partners to be part of the experience. The program offers meaningful engagement with the Museum collection through small group conversation in the galleries on the third Tuesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

The heart of the Third Tuesdays program is to create a welcoming space for open-ended discussion, art appreciation and reflection. Art is for everyone. The Third Tuesdays museum experience of slowing down to explore the world of a painting, object or artifact stimulates wonder, and ignites new ideas and discoveries for participants. Looking at art can open the door to express an idea or feeling, find a personal vision, or unlock an instinct. After a recent CAM Connections tour, Pippy Guiliano, museum guide expressed the many ways the experience stimulated ideas and was unifying, “We had another wonder-filled visit. The level of engagement was palpable. Conversation was off and running … progressed easily covering painting techniques and composition, technology, poetry, color effects, people mellowing with age, inner and outer light.… Our souls were soothed and our minds tuned up in the warmth of camaraderie.”

Third Tuesdays promotes active engagement with the arts as a bridge to reduce isolation and offer an enriching art and culture experience. The Cape Ann Museum, a regional center of art, history and culture with a treasured collection, invites the personal and collective history of older adults with ties to the region, past or present, to be part of the Third Tuesdays experience. The role of the Museum as a community center, bringing people back into connection with their own essential history and with others, helps to form new connections in an atmosphere of mutual fun, growth and learning.

If you are interested in learning more about CAM Connections Third Tuesdays tour program, or would like to make a reservation, please call Cara White at (978)283-0455 x24 or emailcarawhite@capeannmuseum.org.

Discover John Sloan’s Gloucester: A gallery tour with curator Martha Oaks

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present a special gallery tour with Cape Ann Museum curator Martha Oaks on Friday, August 21 at 9:30 a.m. Cost is $10 for Museum members; $15 nonmembers (includes admission). Space is limited; reservations required. For reservations and tickets please call (978)283-0455 x10 or emailinfo@capeannmuseum.org.

One of this country’s most important artists of the early 20th century and a highly respected teacher, John Sloan (1871-1951) spent five summers—1914 through 1918—living and working on Cape Ann. During that time he created nearly 300 finished oil paintings, using Gloucester’s rugged landscape as a backdrop to experiment with color and explore ideas about form, texture and light. Arguably the most productive period of his career, the body of work that Sloan created during this time continues to astonish and delight viewers a century after it was completed.

The Cape Ann Museum is proud to have five major works by John Sloan in its permanent collection: Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914; Old Cone (Uncle Sam), 1914; Glare on the Bay, c.1914; Red Warehouses at Gloucester, 1914; and Dogtown, Ruined Blue Fences, 1916.  Approximately 30 additional works, drawn from public and private collections across the country, will also be on display.

Image: John Sloan (1871-1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. [2008.14]

Image: John Sloan (1871-1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. [2008.14]

Lighthouse Cruise: Circumnavigate Cape Ann by boat to view historic lighthouses

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to offer a lighthouse cruise with Harbor Tours of Cape Ann on Saturday, August 22 at 10:00 a.m. For this trip, a Museum docent will be on board to answer questions and provide insight into the history and culture of Cape Ann. $25 members. $35 nonmembers. Advance tickets required. Please call (978)283-0455 x10 or email info@capeannmuseum.org for more information.

Enjoy the history and beauty of Cape Ann’s coast – up close! Presented by Cape Ann’s longest-running sightseeing company, you’ll get views of the Cape you can’t reach by car – or on any other boat trip! Bring your camera – you’ll see historic lighthouses, Gloucester’s fishing fleet, lobstermen, drawbridges, islands, and Cape Ann’s spectacular natural beauty. Learn about some of the names of famous artists and poets that spent time here painting and writing. Hear about the great granite industry that flourished here for many years.

Restrooms, snacks and drinks are available on board. Trip length is approximately 2-1/2 hours.

Twin Lights, Thatcher's Island from Brier Neck?  photo: John Heywood. c1864-6.  Benham Collection.

Twin Lights, Thatcher’s Island from Brier Neck? photo: John Heywood. c1864-6. Benham Collection.

John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship at the Cape Ann Museum

John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 31, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship on Thursday, August 13 at 7:00 p.m. This is the second of three lectures offered in conjunction with the John Sloan Gloucester Days exhibition on view at the Museum through November 29, 2015. The exhibition will be open for viewing prior to the lecture from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Presented by Avis Berman, an independent writer, art historian, and author of Rebels on Eighth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art; James McNeill Whistler; and Edward Hopper’s New York.

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Self-Portrait, Working, 1916
Oil on canvas
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire
Gift of John and Helen Farr Sloan
©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

High resolution image available on request.

When we consider the subject of portraits of artists, our first thoughts tend to be of likenesses painted on canvas, etched on a plate, or exposed on a negative. But equally compelling in the study of artists and why they make the images they do are those portraits deduced and composed from the examination of psychological and social motivations. This sort of portrayal based on deeper emotional currents is especially revealing in the case of the American painter and printmaker, John Sloan. Sloan could not have matured into the artist he was without the catalytic interlocking relationships he sustained with two other forceful personalities—the painters Robert Henri and John Butler Yeats. The power of these artists’ intense, transformative personal and intellectual friendships—friendships that became central experiences, opened doors to new worlds, and were precious founts of support and inspiration—does much to explain many facets of Sloan’s life and work. The three men’s association also had more general consequences for American art—it was a great influence on drawings, paintings, and prints produced by a number of outstanding artists in Sloan and Henri’s orbit.

Tickets are $10 for members and $15 for non-members. For more information, please call (978)283-0455 x10 or emailinfo@capeannmuseum.org.

The third lecture in the series, presented by Michael Lobel on October 30, will be Passing through Gloucester: John Sloan Between City and Country.


About the exhibition:
One of this country’s most important artists of the early 20th century and a highly respected teacher, John Sloan (1871-1951) spent five summers—1914 through 1918—living and working on Cape Ann. During that time he created nearly 300 finished oil paintings, using Gloucester’s rugged landscape as a backdrop to experiment with color and explore ideas about form, texture and light. Arguably the most productive period of his career, the body of work that Sloan created during this time continues to astonish and delight viewers a century after it was completed.

The Cape Ann Museum is proud to have five major works by John Sloan in its permanent collection:  Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914; Old Cone (Uncle Sam), 1914; Glare on the Bay, c.1914; Red Warehouses at Gloucester, 1914; and Dogtown, Ruined Blue Fences, 1916.  Approximately 30 additional works, drawn from public and private collections across the country, will also be on display.


Exhibition Sponsors:

John Sloan Gloucester Days is sponsored by Carpenter & MacNeille Architects and Builders, Inc. and by Cape Ann Savings Trust & Financial Services.


Gloucester’s Middle Street – An ever evolving neighborhood

Guided walking tour offers historic perspective

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 31, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Historic Middle Street, a guided walking tour of one of Gloucester’s many historically rich streets, on Saturday, August 8 at 10:00 a.m. The tour meets at the Cape Ann Museum at 27 Pleasant Street and lasts about 1 1/2 hours. Tours are held rain or shine. Cost is $10 for Museum members; $20 nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited, reservations required. Emailinfo@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x16 for more information or to reserve a spot. Additional walking tours are offered throughout the summer – please visitcapeannmuseum.org/events for more.

Did you know that a resident of Middle Street, Gloucester, saved the town from a British attack by sea during the Revolution? Or that a leading feminist and religious free thinker lived halfway down Middle Street? Or, that the 1764 Saunders House that forms part of the Sawyer Free Library has undergone at least three radical architectural changes including a massive Victorian tower? Four centuries of Gloucester’s social, economic, and architectural history are packed into this one short street in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Join us for a docent-led tour of an ever-evolving neighborhood where you will see surviving evidence of the past and will learn about structures and people now gone.

unnamed-1The Saunders House, now part of the Sawyer Free Library, in the early 1880s. Photo by Edward Corliss & J. F. Ryan House Photographs, c. 1882-85. 4″ x 6″ cabinet cards. From the collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library and Archives.

Open House at the White-Ellery House Saturday August 1st

9ma1-1Historic Home free and open to the public for 17th Century Saturdays

The Cape Ann Museum, which owns and operates this historic property, will open the White-Ellery House on Saturday, August 1 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Museum docents and staff will be on hand to educate the public about the unique house and its history. The house is located at 245 Washington Street at the corner of Poplar Street in Gloucester and is open to the public at no charge on the first Saturday of the month from May through October as part of Escapes North 17th Century Saturdays. Parking is available off Poplar Street in the field behind the house.

The White-Ellery House was built in 1710 and is one of just a handful of First Period houses in Eastern Massachusetts that survives to this day. Unlike other structures of this period, the largely unfurnished house has had very few interior alterations over the years. Stepping inside today, visitors enter much the same house they would have 300 years ago.

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Ed Note- I was looking for a photo to go with this post for the Cape Ann Museum and found all photos through a Google image search. What history lies behind these walls!42_thumb

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