Tag Archives: Cape Ann Museum

Virginia Lee Burton Folly Cove designer’s diploma from Cape Ann Museum featured in Massachusetts masterpiece trail

Virginia Demetrios is Virginia Lee Burton’s married name and author credit she used for her work as Folly Cove Designer and founder. Her linocut was curated for the MASSterpiece trail 🙂 from Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism (MOTT): https://www.flipsnack.com/eohed/massachusetts-masterpiece-trail.html

Virginia Lee Burton Demetrios

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Explore them all!

Calling all grandparent caregivers! Sawyer Free library hosting a fascinating program with community partners just for you

Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Libary Childrens Services Tuesday April 24, 2018 5:30-7pm 

“Opening Doors, Opening Hearts: Grandparents raising Grandchildren Cape Ann: Guest speakers Deborah Doucette author of Raising our Children’s Children: Room in the Heart and Colleen Pritoni, Director of Commission on the Status of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren.”

This original & innovative event is hosted by Sawyer Free Library Childrens Services in collaboration with community partners like: Cape Ann Museum,  Cape Ann YMCA, Senior Care, The Open Door, Healthy Gloucester Collaborative, WIC, Pathways, NS MVP, and Backyard Growers.

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Larry O’Toole Amazing map and Historic murals at O’Maley School #GloucesterMA

Five monumental Larry O'Toole paintings circa 1948- reinstalled O'Maley School circa 1971 - Gloucester MA DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 wit

photo above- Five monumental Larry O’Toole (1909-1951) paintings circa 1948 were rescued and reinstalled O’Maley School circa 1982. Gloucester MA excellent DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 with ©c ryan.  Thank you DPW! City art is routinely checked. Photo by Phil Curcuru below- note the artist’s distinct “L” signature

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If you haven’t seen the series of five murals painted circa 1945 by fine artist and muralist, Larry O’Toole (1909-1951), that were rescued and installed (decades ago) at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, perhaps you’ve noticed a poster of his brilliant pictorial map around Cape Ann.

O’Toole published editions of the map in 1947 and 1948. Reproductions of “A Salty Map of Cape Ann: Gloucester-Magnolia-Rockport-Pigeon Cove-Lanesville-Bay View-Annisquam” the 1948 blue version are available at Cape Ann Museum shop.  The delightful map includes inventive and intricate details and local nods: a shout out to Ben Pine’s* wharf, “All maps like this have a sea serpent;” schooners like the Henry Ford and Gertrude Thebaud (again Pine); historic sites and characteristic scenes not to miss “Artists and Seagulls”; and upcoming landmarks to look forward to like the Annisquam Bridge slated for completion in 1950. The numbered border framing elements could have been inspired by Virginia Lee Burton.close up zoomable map (sold) can be found here 

 

Gloucester, Massachusetts Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner Gertrude Thebaud against the Canadian schooner Blue Nose for the fisherman trophy, one of the three men who made

Ben Pine office, 1941, Howard Liberman FSA/OWI photograph

Ben Pine* portrait by FSA/OWI photographer, Howard Liberman, titled “Gloucester, Massachusetts. Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner “Gertrude Thebaud” against the Canadian schooner “Blue Nose” for the fisherman’s trophy, is one of the three men who made Gloucester. The others were Tom Carrol and Ray Adams.” (author’s note: Ray Adams was a gal so the compliment is for two men and one woman…).

Art can be seen on the walls throughout the Gloucester Mariner’s Association in Howard Liberman’s faint photos from 1941. I’m looking for more interior shots. Some of the art could be O’Toole’s, who completed commissions for Pine.

Carved fish models at the Gloucester’s Mariners Association (Fishermen’s Institute)

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Cape Ann Museum Kids Calligraphy with Albina Papows!

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Learn calligraphy basics in a morning class with specialist Albina Papows. Inspired by the special exhibition Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann before 1900. Write your name, use calligraphy tools and leave with a sampler to take home. This family workshop is recommended for children 7 and up with an adult. Registration required. To register, please contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org or (978) 283-0455 x16.

Read more at : http://www.capeannmuseum.org/events/cam-kids-second-saturday04-14-18/

 

free Teacher workshop at Cape Ann Museum with support from Essex Heritage | “Unfolding Histories” exhibition opens March 31!

Exciting news from Cape Ann Museum:

March 2018

Teachers throughout Essex County are invited to Cape Ann Museum to study Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann Before 1900, the first major exhibition to bring together historical and archival material from nine Cape Ann institutions focused on life during Cape Ann’s early years, including stories which illuminate the Native American and European contact period, the Revolutionary War, and 19th century history and culture.

Teachers who attend the April 7th Teacher Workshop will discover strategies to increase student literacy with primary source documents using an inquiry-based learning model to tie larger themes to our local area. Designed for K–12 teachers currently working in public & private schools throughout Essex County, this free workshop is a way to earn 10 PDPs for attending the session and creating an activity plan, with additional opportunities to earn more. Space is limited to twenty teachers; registration required. For more information please contact Essex Heritage Education Director Beth Beringer at bethb@essexheritage.org or (978) 740-0444.

The Unfolding Histories exhibit will be on view March 31, 2018- September 9, 2018. Massachusetts Teacher Association members are admitted free!

 

THE UNLIKELY STORY OF THE FOLLY COVE GUILD

Led by beloved children’s author Virginia Lee Burton, this group of mostly untrained women created immortal designs.

Atlas Obscura

By Cara Giaimo

Folly Cove Designers Eino Natti “Polyphemus” 1950 Cape Ann Museum

One by one, the prints unfold before you. One shows sheep leaping in the grass, another, children on a tree-hung swing, the moon shifting above them. All are charming, sophisticated, and unbelievably detailed. They take the essence of everyday objects and activities, and unspool them into mesmerizing patterns. No matter how much you may want them, though, you can’t get these prints on Etsy. In fact, you can’t get them anywhere.

They live mere miles from where they were produced, at the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester—the last bastion of the nearly forgotten Folly Cove Designers. Helmed by a children’s book illustrator and comprised of her previously untrained friends and neighbors, the Folly Cove Designers were hardworking, tight-knit, and sincere—so sincere, they eventually voted themselves into obscurity.

To children worldwide, Virginia Lee Burton is the beloved hand behind half a dozen classics, including Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, and The Little House, intricately illustrated tales of close-knit communities. But to her neighbors at Folly Cove, on the north shore of Massachusetts, she was Jinnee Demetrios. Jinnee and her husband, the sculptor George Demetrios, moved to the area in 1932 with their one-year-old son Aristides, who was soon followed by Mike. The couple quickly became community pillars, making art all day, and spending evenings gathering their friends and neighbors for raucous sheep roasts.

“Folly Cove gets its name because it would be folly to bring a ship in and turn it around,” says Christine Lundberg, producer of the film Virginia Lee Burton: A Sense of Place, as well as the upcoming Beautiful and Useful: The Art of the Folly Cove Designers. This ethos carried over into the rough-and-ready town life. “You couldn’t get pretty little things,” says Lundberg. “If you wanted them, you had to make them.” An artist through and through, Jinnee surrounded herself with homemade treasures, including, as the story goes, a particularly nice set of block-printed curtains. One of her neighbors, Aino Clarke, admired the curtains so much she wanted to make her own. Jinnee and Aino struck a deal: Jinnee would give Aino top-to-bottom design lessons if Aino, a member of the local orchestra, would teach Jinnee’s sons the violin. (A less legendary, but perhaps more truthful, version of this tale holds that Aino suggested Jinnee give design lessons to her neighbors in exchange for money to buy the necessary paper to illustrate her first book.)

Regardless of exactly how the two came together, Jinnee’s flint struck on Aino’s iron sparked an artistic movement. Within its rock-hard exterior, Folly Cove harbored a vein of artistic impulse that dated all the way back to the 1800s, when painters had flocked there to take advantage of the seashore’s distinct sunlight. (“If you spend time lying on the granite around here, you get creative powers,” one resident told Lundberg). As Jinnee and Aino dove into the lessons, other members of the community began joining them.

Folly Cove Designers Virginia Lee Demetrios “George’s Garden” 1964  Printed in her favorite color. Cape Ann Museum

Thus began the Folly Cove Designers (FCD), a ragtag group of locals united by their desire to fill their lives and their minds with a particular form of well-thought-out beauty. Many members were, like Aino Clarke, the children of Finnish immigrants, and sought to combat the economic and emotional hardships of the Great Depression. Others were so-called “Yankees,” who had moved permanently to Folly Cove after vacationing there as children, and who wanted something new to do. Eino Natti, one of the group’s few male members, was an Army veteran and former quarryman—experiences he drew on for prints such as Polyphemus, of a granite-carting train, and PT, which shows near-identical soldiers in mid-squat. Elizabeth Holloran, the local children’s librarian, printed young people skiing and sugaring. “A majority of them were never artists,” says Cara White, director of the Cape Ann Museum’s Folly Cove gallery. “They were editors, architects, housewives, accountants.”

The Folly Cove Designers “diploma,” presented to each member by Jinnee upon their entrance to the guild. Cape Ann Museum.

READ MORE HERE

COLLEEN’S ARTS AND CRAFTS FOR LITTLE ONES ON DISPLAY AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM!

My friend Colleen teaches the sweetest and most fun art class for local youngsters, ages three to seven. Inspired by nature, the projects Colleen leads the children in creating are always wonderfully whimsical. Currently, at the children’s activities room at the Cape Ann Museum, you can see a display of work by her young artists.


Stop in and see-I think you will be utterly charmed, as was I! 

*   *   *

The Cape Ann Museum has several excellent children’s programs scheduled for February vacation.

Wednesday, February 21

Play creative movement games with Sarah Slifer Swift of MAGMA studio and create art that moves!

Thursday, February 22
What’s art got to do with basketball? Shoot hoops at the YMCA, then come to the Museum and sculpt basketball players inspired by those of sculptor Walker Hancock.

Ages 6-12. CAM Members $30/day; non-members $45. Additional children receive discounted rate. To register, please contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org or (978) 283-0455 x16

Image: Walker Hancock (1901–1998), Basketball Players (c. 1961–1977). Bronze. Museum purchase with funds generously provided by Evelyn Bartlett, 1982 [Acc. #2576].

#AcornPress in action: Mary Rhinelander demonstrates printmaking at #GloucesterMA O’Maley Middle School, also

the upcoming weekly workshop at Cape Ann Museum that Mary Rhinelander will be teaching is SOLD OUT, again. Look for future offerings.

The very dedicated and talented O’Maley art teacher, Brett Dunton, shares some action shots of fine artist and master printmaker, Mary Rhinelander, guest teaching printmaking with the authentic Acorn press in one of the 8th Grade art classes at O’Maley Innovation Middle school. Note the foot.

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Fine artist Mary Rhinelander guest teaching linoleum block printing on historic Acorn press at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, with teacher Brett Dunton art class, Gloucester, MA February 2018

Historic portraits sometimes belie the physicality of the process

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Aino Natti (Isabel’s grandfather)

Wonder if the O’Maley students will try this energetic technique? photograph of Aino Clarke from the Cape Ann Musem Folly Cove collection  Read more

Cape Ann Museum teams up with YMCA and MAGMA to promote youth art and sport this February vacation

Within its galleries or on the local road, Cape Ann Museum’s inventive partnering promotes art and projects all children can take part in.

Cape Ann Museum education coordinator, Kirsten Vega, shares special upcoming February programming including two new offerings during school vacation 2018: movement games and art at MAGMA, plus basketeball and art with the YMCA.

Thursday, February 8, 10:30-11:30 am: Young at Art – Folly Cove Designer Valentines. Bring your toddler to Cape Ann Museum for Young at Art on the second Thursday of each month. During this special Valentine’s Day session, we’ll explore the Folly Cove Designers exhibit, touch printmaking tools, learn a song with hand motions, and print our own Valentine’s Day cards. Recommended for children ages 4 and younger with an adult. Free for members or with Museum admission. 

Saturday, February 10, 10:00-12:00 pm: Valentine Workshop with Coco Berkman. Hand print your own animal themed Valentine’s Day cards in printmaker Coco Berkman’s family workshop! Participants leave with a set of cards. Ages 6+ / Free for families.  Space is limited; e-mail kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org for reservations.

 February 20 & 21, 1:00-4:00 pm February School Vacation: Let’s Move at the Museum! Wednesday, February 21 | 1:00-4:00 pm Play creative movement games with Sarah Slifer Swift of Movement Arts Gloucester (MAGMA) studio and create art that moves. Thursday, February 22   | 1:00-4:00 pmWhat’s art got to do with basketball? Shoot hoops at the YMCA and create basketball player sculptures inspired by Walker Hancock.  

Saturday, February 27: 1:00-1:45pm: Family Tour  A tour for history detectives of all ages! Discover the story of Cape Ann by taking a closer look at 10 objects from paintings to film. End your tour in the Activity Center with hands-on fun and art-making. Recommended for families with children under 12. Free for CAM members or with Museum admission. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

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That’s a big movie poster! Dead in the Water Cape Ann Museum premiere

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from the Cape Ann Museum- Gloucester Screening set for “Dead in the Water” FEB 10

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association,  is pleased to present “Dead in the Water”,  on Saturday, February 10 at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  The documentary film dealing with the devastating impacts of federal regulations on the lives of New England ground fishermen was produced and directed by Rockport native and professional filmmaker David Wittkower. A panel discussion with film participants will follow each showing. Tickets are $8 for Museum members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com or call (978)283-0455 x10.

Two and a half years in the making, “Dead in the Water” is Wittkower’s fifteenth documentary film. It was shot in different coastal towns and features scenes and interviews with area fishermen, their spouses and other family members; advocates for fishermen; elected officials; and community activists.  “This film opens the doors for the world to see how difficult and dangerous the life of a fisherman is,” said John Bell, a former three-term mayor of Gloucester (2002 -08). “On top of that, the impact of misguided federal regulations on fishermen has never been presented as powerfully as it is in ‘Dead in the Water.’ This film packs a real punch. It stays with you long after you’ve seen it.” The film also includes the song, “Gloucester Harbor Shore” by Grammy® Award winner, Paula Cole.

Wittkower, a graduate of the American Film Institute in cinematography, describes “Dead in the Water” as an examination of the “relentless destruction of the New England ground

Read more

Cape Ann Museum

January is Membership Month.  Also every year the Museum opens its doors free of charge to all Cape Ann Residents during the month of January.  If you have never been there, you are missing out on a great day of learning and enjoyment.

For more information please check on the link below:

http://www.capeannmuseum.org/

 

 

MAJOR NEWS: RHONDA FALOON TO RETIRE FROM THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

WE LOVE YOU AND WILL MISS YOU RHONDA!

THANK YOU

Dear Friends,

I’m writing to let you know that after almost 13 years as the Executive Director of the Cape Ann Museum, Ronda Faloon has announced her retirement plans. She will continue in her role as Director until May of 2019 and will work with the Museum’s Board of Directors to ensure a smooth transition.

Ronda has led the Museum through a time of meaningful change. When she accepted the director’s position, she spoke of making the Museum “matter” to the community every day. Under her leadership, the Museum has grown into a well-respected and vibrant cultural institution of which we can all be proud.
Perhaps the most visible accomplishment of her tenure was the completion of the transformational renovations in 2014. Less visible, but equally as important, Museum membership has grown and financial support has doubled. The quality and number of our exhibitions and programs have expanded over the years. We have a stronger collection: We’ve been the recipient of major gifts of art and other major gifts are on the horizon. Our two historic houses – the 1710 White Ellery House and 1804 Captain Elias Davis House – have been stabilized and improved. We’ve placed a high premium on scholarship, as evidenced by the development of the online catalogue raisonnéFitz Henry Lane Online and our recent symposium on Lane’s lithography. This past year, we welcomed close to 30,000 visitors – twice as many as were seen a decade ago. Our audiences are more engaged and we have a deeper and richer relationship with our surrounding communities.
I know that Ronda would want me to acknowledge the collaborative nature of these accomplishments. This could not have been done without her colleagues who tirelessly invest their innumerable talents and efforts toward advancing the Museum’s mission or the work of committed Board members and volunteers who offer guidance and wisdom, and who also “roll up their sleeves.” Nor could this have been done without those of you who have encouraged and inspired her, and generously supported the Museum each and every year.

While there is never a perfect time for a transition, the Museum has never been stronger or more prepared for change. We have a renewed commitment to our mission and recognize that there is power in being a small, intimate museum with a stellar collection and a singular story to tell.

We’re close to completing an update of our strategic plan (2018-2023) which will guide our initiatives over the next years and lead us toward the celebration of the Museum’s 150th anniversary and Gloucester’s 400th anniversary in 2023. This is indeed an exciting moment in the Museum’s history and an exciting time for new leadership.

Ronda and I are truly grateful to all of you who are committed to the growth and prosperity of our extraordinary museum.

With warm wishes for the new year,

John Cunningham
President of the Board  

Reminder! Cape Ann Narratives of Art and other special museum events this January

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From the Cape Ann Museum – Entrance to the museum is free in January for Cape Ann residents. Some programs require registering and tickets.

3PM Saturday, January 6 Quick Steps & Ballads prior GMG post

10AM- 12PM Saturday, January 13  CAM KIDS LEGO STUDIO. See prior GMG post

3PM Saturday, January 13, 2017 Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life- A Discussion at the Cape Ann Museum

“The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life: A Discussion on Saturday, January 13 at 3:00 p.m.  This program is free for CAM members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations are not required. Call (978)283-0455 x10 for more information.

Join Martin Ray and several of the artists featured in his new book Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life. Ray’s work explores the artistic talent that local residents have brought to their occupations. Whether one is a writer or woodworker, pastor or painter, mayor or musician, Ray classifies each as an artist, and celebrates the mastery that is exhibited in his/her craft. Panelists include Anne Deneen, pastor; Nan Webber, theater director; Brian King, musician; and Stephen Bates, musician/sculptor.

During the month of January the Cape Ann Museum opens its doors to all Cape Ann residents, in an effort to encourage membership, but also to bring the greater community into closer contact with their art, history and culture. This program will do just that, shedding light on locals who take pride in their craft with unwavering commitment and dedication. Does pursuing one’s vocation make one an artist? You decide.” Image credit (book cover): Martin Ray, 2017.

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10AM -12:15PM, Wednesdays, January 17-February 7, three Wednesdays– print workshop with Mary Rhinelander

Visit the museum event’s page to see the plentiful programming

Down the lane: Fitz Henry Lane art shuffled from Gloucester Sawyer Free library to Cape Ann Museum

You may have noticed that the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library is sporting noticebly thinned out collections, and it’s not just the books. Three Fitz Henry Lane paintings were moved across the street to the Cape Ann Museum: Gloucester Harbor (gifted to the Library by Judith M Todd); Sawyer Homestead Freshwater Cove, Gloucester; and Coasting Schooner off Boon Harbor, ME. Additionally, a portrait of Sawyer and a Bertha Menzler Payton painting are no longer on view.

BEFORE AND AFTER

Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library installation views- BEFORE (Lanes installed) / AFTER (Lanes removed)

Installation view two FITZ HENRY LANE paintings GLOUCESTER HARBOR left and SAWYER HOMESTEAD right at Sawyer Free Public Library ©C Ryan IMG_183127

Past the crowd, on the far walls installation view showing pair of Fitz Henry Lane paintings (Gloucester Harbor on the left and Sawyer Homestead Freshwater Cove on the right). A Carlton T Chapman painting is under the clock. Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library

Installation view two Gruppe paintings former site of two Fitz Henry Lane paintings at Sawyer Free Public Library ©C Ryan_111423

Gloucester, MA. Gloucester Lycecum & Sawyer Free Public Library December 2017 pair of Emile A Gruppe paintings installed (formerly site of two Fitz Henry Lane paintings)

 

You can click on the photos to read captions. The photo pair below show Lane Coasting Schooner replaced with a painting from the Addision Gilbert Hospital collection, a portrait of Sawyer and his wife

 

Library vs Museum

Lane painting installation views comparing Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library vs Cape Ann Museum

More photos from both collections

 

Cape Ann Museum is just across the street and it’s the world’s most vital Lane collection. Still, I wish the paintings could remain at the library. I lament my industry’s inability, all of us, actually– to find a way to make stewardship affordable for repositories just like this one. I’ve been thinking about the pros and cons of making copies for the library. When access to originals is difficult or impossible, copies can be a boon. For example the Madonna atop Our Lady of Good Voyage is a replica. The original is held at the Cape Ann Museum and affords close observation that was impossible from the street. The copy preserves the impact of the site. Two dimensional  poster reproductions and painted copies are rarely more. Mostly, I advocate for originals. Here, original art was replaced with original art.

The gifts were for the library and Gloucester, in varying degrees of partnership with the library since Sawyer’s private endowment upon his death in 1889. The provenance paperwork for the Lanes can be deciphered differently depending upon context.

The Lanes leaving the library made me think about the James Prendergast Library collection deaccession, for operating funds and a new vision, rather than a relocation just across a city square. That library is located in Jamestown New York. The board consigned 44 paintings to two auction houses for November 2017 sales. The update is that several works did not find purchasers, failing to meet presale estimates. The board rejected lowball offers following the public sales, and the art remains with the auction houses to be sold in future to-be-determined sales. The New York Attorney General office denied a purchase offer that would have held the art in Jamestown, ruling instead for public auction.  A makerspace was crafted from three extant rooms where a children’s computer coding Scratch class was offered at the time of the sales. Jamestown had cut annual funding for its library by $300,000. (see prior GMG posts November 20 2017 and auction results)

I was hoping the Lanes might be featured prominently and safely with any interior buildout proposals at Sawyer Free library, like this installation at the Currier (which was a temporary build out for a museum exhibition), and the library’s other works. The Matz gallery is pretty perfect for changing exhibits of local artists.

Installation view ALBERT BIERSTADT The Emerald Pool Currier Museum of Art Mount Washington exhibit January 2017 © c ryan.jpg

 

“Lean into the blustery sea” Inauguration Ceremony underway #GloucesterMA

Big, beautiful turn out and program featuring wonderful speakers and tributes to Mayor Romeo Theken, her essential address, the swearing in of officials, exceptional arts throughout, and fantastic emcee Ronda Faloon, Director of Cape Ann Museum. Councilor Lundberg is the Chair of City Council and Councilor LeBlanc is the Vice Chair.

-quote in title an excerpt from John Ronan great poem WE, HELMSMEN

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Reminder: Quick Steps & Ballads at Cape Ann Museum

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DETAIL (Fitz Henry Lane sheet music cover displayed at Cape Ann Museum’s Drawn From Nature & On Stone exhibition)

FHL sheet music cover for a yankee ship and a yankee crew 1865 litho

photo: FH Lane illustration (Boston Harbor/USS Constitution/State House) for

Captn. E.G. Austin’s quick step
As first performed by the
BOSTON BRIGADE BAND on the anniversary of the
Boston Light Infantry,
May 31st 1837
also the new nautical song A Yankee ship and a Yankee crew,
sung by Mr. Williamson

From Cape Ann Museum- Upcoming Saturday January 6, 2018

Cape Ann Museum Fitz Henry Lane Quick Steps and Ballads

“The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Quick Steps and Ballads: The Sheet Music Lithographs of Fitz Henry Lane, on Saturday, January 6 at 3:00 p.m.  This musical performance is free for Cape Ann residents, Museum members or with Museum admission. Reservations are required and can be made online at camuseum.eventbrite.com or call (978)283-0455 x10.

The performance was conceptualized and coordinated by local musicians Kristina Martin, Kathleen Adams and Beverly Soll with music transcription and program design by Andrew Soll. Featured performers include the Waring School Singers, ‘Leven, Vintage Victorian of Nahant, and other individuals from around the north shore area. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the dances and hear the songs that were popular in the 19th century!

The performance is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Drawn from Nature & on Stone: The Lithographs of Fitz Henry Lane, which was designed to explore artist Fitz Henry Lane’s life and career in detail and against the backdrop of 19th century printmaking culture in America. As early as 1833 Lane was illustrating sheet music for these popular songs of the time. The special exhibition is on display until March 4, 2018.

Image credit: (left) Song of the Fisher’s Wife. Lithograph on paper (sheet music). Drawn by F.H. Lane. Lithograph by Sharp & Michelin Lithography. Published by Oakes & Swan, Boston, 1840. American Antiquarian Society.  (center) The Maniac. Lithograph on paper (sheet music). Drawn by F. H. Lane. Lithograph by Thayer’s Lithographic Press. Published by Parker & Ditson, Boston, 1840. American Antiquarian Society. (right) Sicilian Vespers. Lithograph on paper (sheet music). Drawn by F. H. Lane. Lithograph by Pendleton’s Lithography, Boston. Published by C. Bradlee, Boston, c.1832. Boston Athenaeum. Gift of Charles E. Mason, Jr., 1978.”

Bring it home! Rockefeller Edward Hopper #GloucesterMA Dogtown painting @ChristiesInc

EDWARD HOPPER Cape Ann Granite oc 29 x 40 1928 est 6 to 9 mil private collection Rockefeller

Christies, the New York auction power house is currently marketing the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection across the (art)world–Hong Kong, London, and Los Angeles– before the spring 2018 live sale back in New York. The collection includes a painting by American artist, Edward Hopper (1882-1967), that was inspired by Gloucester: Cape Ann Granite is one of the rare Hopper paintings remaining that’s not currently held in a museum. There are more than 110 Gloucester houses and vistas depicted by Edward Hopper.

Advance promotion of Christie’s upcoming Rockefeller auction have yet to illustrate the painting, although the artist’s recognizable name is mentioned in every press release and the painting is included in the world tour highlights exhibit. The catalogue for the sale is not ready.

Former owners of Cape Ann Granite have in common connections to Harvard, banking and art collecting

Billionaire and philanthropist, David Rockefeller (1915-2017), was a Harvard graduate and longtime CEO of Chase Manhattan bank (later JP Morgan Chase). His art appreciation began early,  influenced by both parents and the Rockefeller family collections. His father was the only son of  John D. Rockefeller, a co-founder of Standard Oil Corp. His mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (1874-1948), helped establish the Museum of Modern Art, and the fund in her name helped secure Hopper’s Corner Saloon for the permanent collection. Several family members were Trustees. After his mother’s death, David took her Trustee seat.

Like David Rockefeller, the first owner to acquire Cape Ann Granite was a Harvard graduate, art collector and financier, about the same age as Rockefeller’s parents, and Hopper. Benjamin Harrison Dibblee (1876 – 1945) was the scion of  California businessman, Albert Dibblee. The family estate “Fernhill” was built in 1870 in Ross, California (later the Katharine Branson School). Benjamin H Dibblee was a Harvard graduate (1895-1899), an All-American Crimson football player (halfback and Team Captain), and head coach (1899-1900). W.H. Lewis, a famous center rush, was the Assistant Coach. (Harvard football dominated under this coaching team. See the standings below the “read more’ break.) In 1909, Dibblee donated his father’s historic papers concerning California’s secret Civil War group “The Home Guard of 1861” including its muster roll and pledge of loyalty to Lincoln and the Union cause. Dibblee was an alternate delegate from California to the Republican National Convention in 1912. As a  Lt. Col. he was listed as one of five California committee members for the American Legion in 1919. He was a big wheel investment banker at EH Rollins & Sons, a firm impacted by the Wall Street crash of 1929.

Benjamin Harrison Dibblee Harvard Football all american then Captain Wikipedia photo first purchaser of Edward Hopper Cape Ann Granite Gloucester MA Dogtown painting later owned by Rock
Wikipedia photo of Dibblee  from The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association football guide, 1899

It’s fun to think about Dibblee possibly visiting Gloucester during his time at Harvard, like so many students and faculty; then, decades later, acquiring a major Hopper because it was both a modern masterpiece, and a Gloucester landscape.

The Hopper Cape Ann Granite painting has me itching to research all Crimson team photos– not simply varsity nor football circa 1895-97– because of the (remote) chance of another Gloucester-Harvard and athletic connection. In 1895 Dibblee was involved with sports at Harvard at the same time as author and Olympian, James Connolly.  In 1899 both were involved with football; Dibblee as the Harvard coach and Connolly as Gloucester’s athletic director and football player**. Maybe they scrimmaged. Maybe they scrimmaged in Gloucester.

Hopper’s artist inventory log pages for ‘1928 oils’ itemizes Cape Ann Granite as follows: “Sent on from Gloucester September 27, 1928, 3 canvases. Cape Ann Granite, 29 x 40, Green picture on hill with rocks. Fresh green in foreground. Slanting shadows cast by rocks and boulders. Sky blue with clouds. Small tree on R. BH Mr. Dibblee 49 Wall Streeet of San Francisco (Lived near 14 miles from San Francisco. Knows Alex Baldwin in Calif. (SanFrancisco) 1500 -1/3. 1000 on June 5, 194 ” 

EDWARD HOPPER diary page includes Gloucester entries

From Hopper’s Artist’s ledger -Book, ink graphite on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, Gift of Lloyd Goodrich

 

The pencil annotation “Modern Masters EH 1933” accompanying the thumbnail sketch for the painting on the right of this entry may be mixed up. There was a  “Modern Masters” exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) held in 1940 but it did not include this painting on the checklist. There was an Edward Hopper Retrospective held at MoMA October 30–December 8 in 1933 that did list this Gloucester painting, and the lender, Dibblee. (Incidentally, two other 1928 oils catalogued on that same inventory page, Manhattan Bridge Loop and Freightcars Gloucester, would both end up in the Addison Gallery collection at Phillips Academy.)

The Pure Landscapes

Excerpts from the 1933 MoMa Hopper retrospective exhibition catalogue:

“…When Hopper went to art school the swagger brushstroke of such painters as Duveneck, Henri, and Chase was much admired. Perhaps as a reaction against this his own brushwork has grown more and more modest until it is scarcely noticeable. He shuns all richness of surface save where it helps him to express a particular sensation…in spite of his matter-of-factness, Hopper is a master of pictorial drama. But his actors are rarely human: the houses and thoroughfares of humanity are there, but they are peopled more often by fire hydrants, lamp posts, barber poles and telegraph poles than by human beings. When he does introduce figures among his buildings they often seem merely incidental. Perhaps during his long years as an illustrator he grew tired drawing obviously dramatic figures for magazines. Hopper has painted a few pictures in which there are neither men nor houses. The pure landscapes Cape Ann Granite (9), Hills, South Truro (16), Camel’s Hump (22) occupy a place apart in his work. they reveal a power which is diconcertingly hard to analyze. Cezanne and Courbet and John Crome convey sometimes a similar depth of feeling towards the earth and nature…” Alfred Barr, 1933

“In its most limited sense, modern art would seem to concern itself only with the technical innovations of the period. In its larger and to me irrevocable sense it is the art of all time; of definite personalites that remain forever modern by the fundamental truth that is in them. It makes Moliere at his greatest as new as Ibsen, or Giotto as modern as Cezanne.” Edward Hopper, 1933 

Yale owns a related watercolor by Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Pasture

EDWARD HOPPER, oil on canvas, Yale University collection, Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester by Catherine Ryan

 

Catherine Ryan art image design Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MAProceeds from the sale of the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection at Christies next spring will benefit 10 selected charities. Perhaps a magnanimous collector might consider this Hopper Dogtown purchase for the Cape Ann Museum, a philanthropic twofer in this case, and needed. Cape Ann Museum does not possess a Hopper Gloucester painting and if any musuem should, it’s CAM. We need to eventually guide back the Hopper painting Gloucester Street, too.

Gloucester Street private collection Edward Hopper all around Gloucester

Glou Street Edward Hopper

To date Christie’s auction house has promoted primarily a Picasso and Matisse as the star lots from this collection of masterpieces because of their hefty valuation. The presale estimate for the Matisse Odalisque couchée aux magnolias (1923) is 50 million.  The Picasso painting, Fillette à la corbeille fleurie (1905), a “Rose period Masterwork”, is estimated to top 70 million. The presale estimate for the Hopper is 6 million to 8 million.

Christies highlight page for Rockefeller does not show the Hopper yet Dec 12 2017

Christies first press roll out features the Pciasso and Matisse

 

The Picasso was diplayed in the  libary of  the Rockefeller Upper East Side mansion at 146 East 65th Street.   Its first owners were Gertrude and Leo Stein. Gertrude Stein hated it though her brother bought it anyway. After Alice B. Toklas (Stein’s partner) died in 1965,  MoMa trustees drew lots and were offered first pass on the legendary Stein collection. David Rockefeller won first pick, and selected the Picasso. I wonder how it will fare in this #metoo awakening. At the time of her death, Toklas had long been evicted from their Paris home as she had no legal standing nor benefit from any estate sales.

Gertrude and Leo Stein Rockefeller Picasso provenance

installation Leo and Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas collection at home

installation Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas

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Cape Ann Museum Tenth Annual Women’s Luncheon rolls out the @GrosvenorWilton carpet

December 6, 2017 – more photos to come!

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Hundreds of guests streaming in to enjoy the 10th Annual Women’s Luncheon, Cape Ann Museum’s wonderful annual benefit to help raise funds for a unique collections-related project.

Ahead of the lunch, happy guests  are viewing the stunning wallpaper in the Davis house,l– acquired with support from last year’s luncheon–, current exhibitions, and holiday shopping in the museum’s boutique shop.

New to the gift shop- custom sampler

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The 2017 luncheon campaign will support “the purchase and installation of historically accurate carpeting in the Captain Elias Davis House, a Federal style structure built in 1804…Carpet for this project will be made by the Grosvenor Wilton Company Ltd. founded in 1790.” 

Photo – Davis House before carpet

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The 10th Annual Women’s Luncheon welcomes Melissa Geisler Trafton, an art historian specializing in 19th century landscape painting, as the special speaker. Trafton was the Adjunct Curator and Managing Editor for the museum’s momentous Fitz Henry Lane Online and wrote one of the essays in the exhibition catalog for the current exhibition: Drawn from Nature & on Stone: The Lithographs of Fitz Henry Lane.

Gals

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