Tag Archives: Boston Globe

Cape Ann TV has a big, beautiful and bold goal: to be one of the premiere community media stations in the country

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How? Executive Director Erich Archer states it plainly:  “The team at Cape Ann TV and this community make that goal possible. There’s something special and local: the characters, stories and the beauty of Cape Ann. People actively participate in this community, which is incredibly important.  Plus, there’s high caliber and diverse talent.”

CATV AND COMCAST

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Cape Ann TV is located at 38 Blackburn Center in Gloucester, MA, and it’s community television, local, social, and non-commercial. Unlike PBS –which produces shows for a national audience and broadcasts broadly via satellites– community television stations create, produce, and distribute content locally, via a cable provider. There are 350+ active community television stations across the country that operate with a variety of funding sources depending upon how they’re set up. *Since an FCC mandate in 1972, cable providers receive access to rights of way in exchange for funding local cable TV channels by and for the public. The cable television franchise contract fees pay for equipment, training, facilities, studio time and channels (air time). Currently the fiscal model for Cape Ann TV covers operation and capital needs.  Comcast is the local Cape Ann TV cable provider. Archer said that Cape Ann TV has spent more than a year working together with local governments, area schools, partners and citizens to outline and identify what the communities wanted to include in renegotiation terms for the next 10 year contract with Comcast. It was a massive document and effort, and is currently under negotiation.

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The original purpose of cable access continues to be providing TV studios and support for community members so they can make their own content. Our station, CATV, has much to offer that’s relevant. If you need video, CATV can make it for you whether you are an individual, non-profit, for profit or municipality. Make it a point to visit the station and use this invaluable resource. While you’re at it, why not

START YOUR OWN TV SHOW AT CATV

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Here’s your chance. Members can use the cameras, production, and the studio to make their own TV show. You can sign up for film maker and editing classes, lunch workshops, state of the art equipment, cameras, the conference room for community meetings, editing banks, and studio time. Do it. Have fun.

CREATE YOUR OWN PODCAST AT CATV

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There have been upgrades to CATV headquarters: new wall color, original art, and re-design including transposing an under-utilized lobby into a beautiful podcast studio. Podcasts are on an uptick everywhere thanks to easy on demand listening. Since the podcast studio was put in at Cape Ann TV there have been hundreds of downloads–beyond clicking and listening. Invested audiences are saving the shows to listen at their convenience. Archer notes, “We have podcasts about high school sports, one from NOAA about fishery-related issues, arts and variety, and more.” CATV encourages people to start one if they’re interested. “We’ll help them every step of the way.”

WHAT’S ON CATV?

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Cape Ann TV broadcasts original programs and local coverage: area high school sports, city council and municipal meetings, community meetings, Cape Ann Museum programs, library events, local artists and art groups, Cape Ann scenics, and school productions to name just a few. Award winning programs include: The Portrait Series; Awesome Gloucester; GMG podcastsWriters Block with John RonanAll Things Victorian; and the Emmy-winning On the Waterfront, a series about how local seafood gets to your plate.

DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN HIRE CATV FOR COMMERCIAL CONTENT?

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Does your business or organization need any professional video shot? Cape Ann TV funding sources also include for profit productions for commercial content. So, if you want to make a video for commercial purposes that will not air on Cape Ann TV, you can contract Cape Ann TV to make it. CATV can work at a high quality and any budget. Do you have an exciting event you’d like to capture? Do you need to film a board room meeting? One example- CATV produced film for a permanent display at Cape Ann Museum.

DID YOU KNOW GRANT FUNDERS AND COMMUNITY GET DOUBLE VALUE?

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CATV has strategically partnered with organizations seeking grant funding. If an organization is writing a grant proposal that includes a video element, they can write CATV into the grant, and CATV will match the grant funds with in kind services. So for example Cape Ann Seafood Exchange wrote a big grant, and they won $5000 as part of this big grant to make a video. CATV matched that award which meant Seafood Exchange could make a $10,000 value video. Next time you’re writing a grant, think about ramping up the application with a video component, and plan ahead so it can happen!

A NOTE FROM MAYOR ROMEO-THEKEN

“Cape Ann Television is an invaluable asset to Gloucester and the Cape Ann community. The city turns to CATV for important local news, information and media education opportunities. The dedicated staff members and volunteers at Cape Ann Television through the leadership of Erich Archer work tirelessly to improve and broaden their coverage of public, education, and government events, keeping our citizens informed and entertained. I have been involved with Cape Ann Television for many years, sharing my views as a city councilor, mayoral candidate and finally, today as Mayor. From this personal experience, I have always recognized the value that CATV provides, allowing local citizens the opportunity to share opinions and information. It is a critical piece of our city’s democracy.” Mayor Romeo Theken, City of Gloucester, MA

DIRECTOR CATV

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Erich Archer has been at the helm of Cape Ann TV for three years. He is a filmmaker and editor by profession. “I try to produce at least one original project a year that I’m proud of. The two On the Waterfront episodes are definitely in that category, as are the two Portrait Series pieces.”

Prior to running the station he worked in Los Angeles in TV and advertising. He moved back from LA for…love.  His wife, Tara, is a wardrobe stylist who grew up on the North Shore. They have two children and reside in Beverly. As a boy, Archer spent summers on Wingaersheek beach with his family. His parents recently moved to Rocky Neck; his mother, Kathleen Gerdon Archer, had a gallery on Rocky Neck. That’s her original art on the walls.

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Helpful links:

Mass.gov Massachusetts Community Access Television 

National Alliance for Community Media 

MassAccess (Massachusetts Community Media, INC) state advocacy membership organization and network. Cape Ann TV is a member and Archer is serving as an officer.

*For more information see Cable Communications Act of 1984 

2014 Boston Globe good article by Steven Rosenberg

Joe G writes GMG: Does anyone have more information on this Rosario Piraino painting? WWII Veteran, Artist, GHS Class of 1945

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Joe G writes:

“Hello Joey:  I’ve been trying for many years to find out some information about a painting by Rosario Piraino that I have. In image of that painting is embedded below. 

I did mail a letter to an address in Gloucester back in about 2003, to whom I thought was a relative (I think the name was Carmella Rosario), but my letter was returned and marked “Not at this address.”  I’d sent some emails to a woman who’d shown on her Facebook page that she was indeed related to Mr. Piraino, but I never got any response. 

In any case, I’m trying to find out if there is a gallery or other place where some of his paintings may be on view. His work is quite good. 

If you might have any information about the subject I would be very appreciative if you would be so kind as to share any of it with me.  

Thank you.”

Rediscovering art and artists can be slow detective work. I don’t know the approximate year of the painting. The rocks could be identified. GMG readers may know more: is there a fellow artist that showed together in a group show with Rosie, traded art, stories? Did he hang his paintings in his house? Did he have a studio? Do you own a similar work? I did not find his name in some local artist member directories. The obituary describes seascapes and schooner as motifs. Let’s see!

For GMG readers like me who did not know him (I know many did), here is some information about Rosario Piraino that may jog some memories. Joe G thanks for the note and intriguing request.

Rosario A “Rosie” Piraino (1927- 1989)

Rosario was born in Gloucester on November 23, 1927. He was a life long Gloucester resident and graduate of the Class of 1945. He was a member of the ROTC. His interest in the GHS yearbook, Flicker? Drawing. He was a WWII army Veteran and member of the Capt. Lester S. Wass Post #3, American Legion and the Gloucester Lodge of Elks No. 892.  He was a professionally trained artist with a fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Boston. In 1971 his family resided at 14 Orchard Street. For nearly 3 decades, he worked as an artist and Art Director at MIT before retiring in 1991*. There is a comment about carpooling with him to Lincoln Labs.

*From the printed matter for his obituary:

“Rosario was dedicated to his family and his beloved city. He was happiest strolling the boulevard meeting and greeting his friends. He spent his younger years working as a fish cutter along the waterfront. Along with his friend, the late Charlie Favalora, he owned and operated the Pioneer Fish Company.

He was an accomplished fine artist, having painted many seascape images of the Cape Ann waterfront. One of his favorite subjects was the schooner “Gertrude L. Thebaud”. Rosario was an avid golfer, who was affectionately known as the “King of Candlewood”, a nod to the three “holes-in-one” he made in his retirement. He will be missed by the many friends who enjoyed his sense of humor, stories and positive attitude.

In addition to his wife of six years, he is survived by three daughters and sons-in-law, Stephanie and Steve DelTorchio, Kathryn and Douglas Goodick and Paula and John Reilly all of Gloucester, three sons and two daughters-in-law, Stephen and Gayle (Frary) Piraino of Rockport, Dominic Piraino of Phoenix, AZ and James and Donna (Durland) Piraino of Gloucester, six grandchildren, Jeffrey Piraino of Rockport, Stephen and his wife, Kimberly DelTorchio of Satellite Beach, FL, Lindsay and Amy DelTorchio and Lauren and Adam Goodick all of Gloucester, three brothers, Frank Piraino of Gloucester, James and his wife, Marie Piraino of Waltham and Walter and his wife, Susan Piraino of Peachtree City, GA, a sister, Phyllis and her husband, Ernest Morin of Gloucester, a brother-in-law, Paul Ventimiglia of Gloucester, two sisters-in-law, Eileen Trupiano and Francesca Piraino both of Gloucester, Josephine’s grandson, Jonathan Moore of Essex and many nieces and nephews. He was also predeceased by his first wife, Grace M. (Ventimiglia) Piraino, a brother, Anthony Piraino and a brother-in-law, Salvatore Ventimiglia.”

Their daughter, writer Stephanie DelTorchio, responds.

Their daughter, Kathryn Goodick, ran for Ward 4 City Council in 2015. That link is from GMG which ran any candidate press release that was sent in.

Piraino’s 2008 quote in the Boston Globe Saints and Sinners Collide (Fiesta and Brewery):

“In the onetime fishing capital of the world, the St. Peter’s Fiesta – a five-day festival where faith, family, and celebration are emphasized – brings thousands of people into Gloucester’s downtown. But over the last decade, as the fishing industry has nearly collapsed and the fiesta has taken on commercial sponsors – such as liquor companies – some wonder if more people see the event as a reason to party than to pray. “They took God out of it,” says Rosario Piraino, a retired fisherman and fish plant owner.”

Bravo! Gloucester Stages’s YAW in the news- winter spring summer or fall the best kids acting classes around

Congratulations! Marvelous Heidi Dallin and crew really deserve this praise! 20160812_152926

LEARNING FROM AN OSCAR NOMINEE- Lindsay Crouse’s visit was on the front page of the Gloucester TimesWendy Waring’s visit was also on the front page of the Gloucester Times and in the Boston Sunday Globe!

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Gloucester’s clean harbor: H2O no no’s are in the past

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Did you read about Cape Cod’s Big Water Drinking Problem in the Boston Globe magazine this past weekend, the cover story? Oy, complicated.

There’s still time to register for the annual Celebrate the Clean Harbor Swim which will be held at Niles Beach Saturday morning. Swim or raise a toast–there is so much to celebrate.

Swim to celebrate Gloucester’s clean water

Swim to celebrate the moments people help*

Swim to celebrate a history of ongoing conservation

Swim to celebrate the guys on the DPW crews

Before it was Celebrate the Clean Harbor it was… clean it.

Thirteen year old Elinor Doty swam a mile and a half in 29 minutes, ahead of 16 other swimmers in 1979. The race was in tribute to John McPhee, head of Gloucester Sea Scouts. “We tried to get swimmers who knew John McPhee,” said race organizer Jim Doty, Elinor’s father. “I’d like to make it an annual event if I can swing it…”

“Rounding out the field of 17, was 68 year old Sara Robbins, who was surprised by an unexpected visitor during the middle of the race. “The grey harbor seal popped up beside me to show me a two-pound flounder that he had caught,” said Robbins, who has been training a half mile each day for the past two weeks. “I’m not too fast but I get there.” She said she used the side stroke during the whole course.”

Doty came in first place again in 1980 when the swim morphed into the ideal kick off event for Cape Ann’s Year of the Coast. Because of water quality, several parents wouldn’t let their children participate. “And only two are from the Cape Ann YMCA, James Doty notes, which usually supplies more contestants.

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1979

 

Water pollution was rarely mentioned if at all before the Cape Ann Year of the Coast, an undeniable avalanche tipping point. One 1980 article has a picture of Sarah Fraser Robbins, Sarah Evans and Chandler Evans. The 8 year old was ceremoniously passed from boat to boat and then dropped in so three generations could swim across the finish line. In 1981 organizers reminded people that they didn’t need to complete the swim, they could jump in and swim across the finish line in support. I wonder if that tradition was maintained?

1980 swimmers besides the Evans clan and Doty–Gloucester residents, unless otherwise stated: David Hayden (2nd place), Karen Hartley of Dorchester (3rd place), Andy O’Brien of Rockport, Barry Hallett Jr, Darrell Hallett (swam part way alongside his brother), Kay Rubin, Polly Doty of Dedham, Jack Crowley of South Weymouth, Carl Blumenthanl, Chris Lovgren of Gloucester, Stan Luniewicz, Bill Jebb representing Sea Tec, Steve Haskell Sea Tec, Sharon Kishida Sea Tec, Earl Kishida Sea Tec, Jan Childs, Chris Sanders of Rockport, Chris Vonalt of Rockport, and Sam Rugh.

Councilor Carolyn O’Connor led a brief awards ceremony. I love the quip recorded in Laura Meades 1980 sports report Hardy Swimmers Keep Heads High“As they went on, the swimmers shouted encouragement to one another and checked their progress.  “What’s ahead of us?” asked Steve Haskell of SeaTec Inc, a diving firm. “A couple of 8-year olds,” replied SeaTec’s owner, Bill Jebb, swimming beside Haskell.”

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1980

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1980

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I hope DPW feels proud that their work protected us, Gloucester’s famous harbor, our legacy.

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Before the waste water treatment facility was built in 1984, untreated waste (sanitary, storm water, industrial, you name it) was discharged directly into the inner and outer harbor. Gloucester was not alone. Rockport, Essex, Beverly- there were many North Shore stories. I wish I knew the name of every person that did the necessary retrofitting and water treatment labor. They dug up roads, laid pipe, cleaned up messes, dealt with outfalls, extended sewer lines, requested a decontamination shower and changing area (1978) so they wouldn’t have to wash up at home, engineered, mapped, and monitored what was necessary to bring us from a crisis by 1980–and lawsuit– to where we are now in 2016. DPW continues to address storm water pollution, also mandated, and will make next year’s compliance deadline. (Gloucester is not unduly impaired by industrial waste like some other communities that will feel the pinch.) Thanks to Larry Durkin, Environmental Engineer, DPW, and Senator Tarr’s office for pouncing on MBTA’s pesticide spraying.

To paraphrase the famous George M Cohan quote: My mother thanks you, my father thanks you, my brother thanks you, andI will add that my children thank you, future generations thank you, wildlife thanks you, businesses thank you, truly all of Gloucester thanks you!

**I grabbed material for this post from GDT headlines thanks to   Sawyer Free Library. Newspapers on microfilm are available in the Reference Department. I am not alone in dreaming of the day when Gloucester archives, Gloucester Daily Times, and other essential research are digitized, but I tend to repeat this ongoing plea.

*It’s not one person, event or decade that stands out. There’s an incredible timeline of care. Who would you add? part 2

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In the news: Boston Globe 10 places to paint the town (or the beach, or the mountains) plein air recommendations

Happy to see Cape Ann included–thanks Cape Ann Chamber for putting up the flag.

Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester, and Essex are listed together under Cape Ann as a destination for plein air painting. I enjoyed reading and comparing. The first town listed, Jeffersonville, VT, has vivid detail. Cape Ann has history and scenery coming together at every turn.

I might have added that Cape Ann has been the home of the world class Cape Ann Museum, two renowned associations devoted to the advancement of art – the North Shore Art Association and the Rockport Art Association-, one of the country’s oldest continuously active and iconic art colonies on Rocky Neck, and scores of artists and galleries, because it is the number 1 place to paint.

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Are North Shore bird sightings published in the Boston Globe? If so Gloucester horseshoe crab, plover sandpiper somethings, red knots

I saw the BIRD SIGHTINGS call out in the Sunday Boston Globe and noted the Plum Island list. (Under ‘Miscellaneous’ there is one bird listed from Gloucester.) I have no idea if that is the MassAudubon customary geographic selection, randomly culled, or all that’s available at the time of publication. I suppose I was looking for a  ‘Gloucester’, ‘North Shore’,  or ‘Cape Ann’ heading. I am confident the region is represented because folks like Chris Leahy, Dave Rimmer, Essex Greenbelt, other experts, citizen scientists, and fans report from our communities.

*This just in update: Dave Rimmer reports that the piping plover fencing at Good Harbor came down today.

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GMG features many bird photographs, from FOBs and contributors especially Kim Smith and Donna Ardizzoni.  Here’s an unofficial appreciator’s list with a few Gloucester sightings: ‘sandpipers’ on Long Beach last week. Piping plover (heard/saw),’plovers’ and ‘sandpipers’ on Good Harbor beach on July 25. One (dead) horseshoe crab and 1 sand dollar (alive) off Wingaersheek on July 26. Piping Plover (heard/saw) on Good Harbor this morning. What have you seen?

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Boston Globe weekly update includes Summer Drift exhibition at Flatrocks Gallery in Gloucester with works of art by Susan Egan, Frances Hamilton and Kyle Brown. And Rockport Bearskin Neck in travel section.

Summer Drift at Flatrocks Gallery continues through August 14th.

July 17 2016 Flatrocks Gallery Boston Globe

(The cropped Statue of liberty is a file photo from the 2015 Revere Beach sand sculpting festival which returns next weekend.)

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Piping Plovers Found Dead in CT. MA conservation plans eased and peaceful

The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Massachusetts Wildlife, announced a new statewide piping plover conservation plan last Friday.

Thank you to the GMG reader who saw the news on TV, and wrote a comment on the Disney-Pixar post. Massachusetts may be the model for North America. The MA Wildlife report includes the conservation approach implemented in Cape Cod last year, home to 60+% of MA piping plover population.  I don’t have the tv station’s coverage, but I included the WBUR wire pick, and piping plover reports from CT, NH, and ME. Kim Smith is covering the pair on Good Harbor Beach. Nesting Piping Plovers have been seen on Coffins Beach and Revere Beach.

Currently, the Atlantic coast population (North Carolina to Eastern Canada) of piping plovers continues to hold steady just under 2,000 pairs. The Massachusetts State Department of Fish and Wildlife targets maintaining 625 pairs with greater intervention should the population fall below 500 pairs.

Boston Globe

YR 2013, State Department Fish and Wildlife

 

Piping plovers were not rare enough to be described as a ‘wild’ species in 1895 in Daniel Giraud Elliot’s North American Shore Birds. He wrote that where the species had been formerly ‘most abundant’ the piping plover was “found chiefly on the more retired parts of the cost where it was free from molestation…its acquaintance with man has caused it to be at the present time, in most places where it is found, a rather wary bird.” The fattened birds were “palatable, yet sometimes sedgy in flavor.” Skunks and other predators, influx in summer population, and loss of habitat were concerns. Plastic trash is a striking difference now. At least we don’t eat them.

CONNECTICUT

Three Piping Plovers were recently killed in their nesting habitat at Griswold Point in Old Lyme CT. It’s believed a fourth was intentionally stepped on in Bluff Point State Park in Groton, CT. “People ignore the signs.”

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2 minute video

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Conservation monitors the piping plovers.  The Connecticut Audubon Society doesn’t maintain piping plover information, however they do have an incredible osprey project to report. Tom Andersen told me that the CT Audubon Society has built up a network of more than 300 volunteers to find and monitor osprey. An intern has plotted the work of these citizen scientists on this Osprey Nation map. Nests have grown from 200 to 500. I think I’m inspired to do a map of the piping plovers if someone in MA or in the state office hasn’t done it already!

MASSACHUSETTS – CAPE COD

Massachusetts may be the national model.

Read WBUR on the MA Wildlife press release with a focus on Nauset New Plan Allows Beachgoers More Room While Protecting Piping Plovers

David Abel wrote about it back in January for the Boston Globe (January 21, 2016)  Beachgoers may get break as plovers rebound:  

“In Orleans, after years of losing hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in fees for stickers to drive on town beaches, local officials independently sought and obtained a federal waiver last year to allow a limited number of vehicles back on the beach.” 

“For Russ Hopping, who oversees about 27 miles of beaches from Ipswich to Nantucket for the Trustees of Reservations, a federal waiver would mean more than getting rid of some fences on their beaches. It would mean fewer headaches. With some 60 plover pairs on their beaches last summer, Hopping hopes new flexibility would translate into fewer complaints and greater protection for the birds. 

“That we’ve reached the point that this opportunity even exists represents a conservation success story for Massachusetts,” he said.

Nauset WBUR

photograph Jesse Costa/WBUR

South shore and Plum Island stories have been contentious (e.g. WBZ’s 2010 story in Plymouth Are they protecting the plovers or their view? )

The town of Duxbury canceled their annual 4th of July beach bonfire because piping plover pairs returned and were nesting year after year. “Most Duxbury residents said they understand the need to cancel the bonfire for the bird. Since the birds return every year, the committee said next year they’ll consider a new tradition of having the beach bonfire at another time.”

NEW HAMPSHIRE

There are 7 pairs  reported in NH right now in Seabrook and Hampton.Since protection efforts began in New Hampshire in 1997 through 2015, 99 nesting pairs of plovers have fledged 127 chicks on the state’s seacoast.”

MAINE

The Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and Maine Audubon  report Piping Plovers first sightings in 2016 on beaches at Kennebunkport, Kennebunk and Old Orchard Beach. They’re sending an estimate about nests.

MASSACHUSETTS- CAPE ANN- Gloucester

search for Kim Smith’s exceptional documentation and photographs on Good Morning Gloucester about the one nesting pair on Good Harbor Beach

more on GMG:

 

Boston Globe on Beauport, Biotech, Windover

“Fishing is going to be our heritage and first priority,” Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken said. But she added, “We’re moving forward.”

Kathleen Conti describes Gloucester Biotechnology Academy and Beauport Hotel as meaningful catalysts. In addition to the Mayor’s quote, there are comments  and points of view shared by several: Sherri Zizik; Vito Giacalone; Gregory Verdine; Ken Riehl, Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce (nice quote); Lee Dellicker, Winhover Construction (Beauport); George Marsh (architect Gloucester Biotechnology). Oh, and the former Mayor of New Bedford, John Bullard. chimes in.

Other new businesses downtown beyond this article include goodlinens opening July 1, Jane Deering Gallery on Pleasant Street, the new bicycle rental shop, and Tonno restaurant. And there’s a new gallery coming to Rocky Neck. More on that later!

 

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Art and money: Boston Creates chaos and Clara Wainwright Boston Globe op ed

A draft of the coveted 10 year master arts and culture plan for the City of Boston dropped in May a dud, despite– or because of –its $1.2 million price tag.  There’s a lot of pressure riding on Boston Creates final report, postponed until this coming Friday, June 17th. Boston is not alone in its struggles over funding and competing demands. Boston Creates and the ‘Art Czar’ fever did contribute to a climate of planning mana mania that found its way into Gloucester and other cities and towns. Boston Magazine writer Patti Harrigan profiled the year of Boston Creates, warts– no all in the article, “Boston’s Creative Crisis”:

Marty Walsh’s $1.4 million Boston Creates plan was supposed to turbocharge the city’s arts scene. A year after its launch, are we ever going to get anything other than a series of kumbaya sessions and generic platitudes?” 

She does a good job covering some of the reasons. I can add more.  Another perspective was an op-ed piece penned by Clara Wainwright for the Boston Globe. You may know her work with the celebrated 1998 quilt series: “Protecting the Oceans That God Has Created,” by Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association members including Lena Novello, Angela Sanfilippo, Fino Sanfilippo, and Nina Groppo. I am confident you have heard about another iconic project she established.

First Night founder and artist with Gloucester ties,  Clara Wainwright, weighs in on Boston Creates. Her column “A Way Forward for Boston Creates” was published on June 2, 2016, excerpt below:

Clara Wainwright

“Members of the arts community are praising Mayor Walsh’s Boston Creates, a 10-year master plan for the city’s cultural life, but are concerned about funding. The result of interviews with leaders of large and small arts organizations, and of community brainstorming in Boston’s neighborhoods, the Boston Creates report was directed by Julie Burros, the Mayor’s new cabinet-level chief of arts and culture. In presenting a draft of the report (the final is due to appear June 17), Burros pointed out the broad, rich scope of the plan, but warned that there was minimal funding to carry out some of its goals. I was again reminded of the recent Boston Foundation report that placed Boston last of 10 major cities’ support for the arts. Why such a sad warning, when Boston’s arts organizations and artists have been so clever and resourceful over the years?

In 1970 the Institute of Contemporary Arts invited city agencies and community organizations to come up with projects. The parks commissioner wanted a huge bell on Boston Common, which children could ring by swinging on its rope; a community health center wanted a mural for its waiting room. Artists were invited to choose one of many project ideas or submit a dream of their own. A large array of their ideas were exhibited in City Hall, which then had an art gallery. Mayor White’s Office of Cultural Affairs and the city’s financial community were encouraged to fund those selected. Boston Gas saw Corita Kent’s proposal for a billboard and commissioned her to paint a mural on one of its tanks.

Currently, Artists for Humanity provides instruction and small salaries to 200 high school students in a state-of-the-art building in South Boston. Zumix gives East Boston children musical instruction, the opportunity to perform, and a recording studio and a radio station. Both organizations were initiated by dynamic young women in the 1990s on minimal budgets. Some of their funding today comes from corporate commissions for murals, graphic work, and performances.

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2016 Smart Growth conference #MSGA16

I’m in Worcester, MA, attending the 2016 Smart Growth Alliance conference (I was an invited speaker at a prior conference.)  The conference brings city planners, transportation and civic innovators, real estate and housing professionals, business leaders, non-profits, architects, Great Neighborhood and gateway cities, and –well, let’s just say a wide range of (primarily) policy folk.

It’s surprisingly enjoyable.

This year, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito is the key note speaker and we’ll hear from Worcester the host city. Other headliners include Michael Hogan President & CEO of AD Makepeace Company; Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport; Dan Burden the ‘walkability guru’; Parris Glendening former MD Governor and President of Smart Growth America’s Leadership Inst; Veronica Eady, VP Conservation Law Foundation; and Monica Tibbits-Nutt, Executive Director 128 Business Council. There will be more than 70 speakers. Attendees often fan out in groups to cover more panels.  I’ll report back where I’ve landed.

One topic that will swirl in the background concerns housing and a landmark bill S.122 proposing changes to planning, zoning and permitting. The organizers support this in a big way. Director Andre Leroux writes, “We believe that the (legislators) have done a thoughtful job balancing the needs of municipalities, developers, and the environment. “

With two-thirds of Millennials desiring to live in walkable, transit-accessible places at the same time that seniors shift to apartment living, suburban communities have a real test before them.  Communities like Newtonville need to decide between planned growth and unplanned growth. For its peers like West Concord village, Winchester Center, Andover and Newburyport, the future is already happening.” Quite a dishy prompt.

The Boston Globe endorsed the bill, you may have noticed the title: “Make Room for Granny, and other zoning fixes.” Granny does live longer than Grandpa.

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Boston Globe features Walter McGrath’s work at Gloucester’s Cove Hill Cemetery

Great story by Hattie Bernstein in the Globe today gives a shout out to Walter McGrath in Gloucester.

Boston Globe may 30 2016 grave guards

“If you go to a cemetery on Memorial Day, you’ll see flowers and flags planted everywhere and a lot more visitors than usual.

What won’t be obvious on this holiday dedicated to military veterans who died fighting in wars are the efforts of Northborough’s Beth Finch McCarthy, 53, Gloucester’s Walter McGrath, 83, and Jordan Hurley, 15, who lives in Middleborough.

The three are among an uncounted battalion of volunteers across the region who share a common pursuit: maintaining their communities and ensuring that those buried there aren’t forgotten.

McGrath, a retired engineer with a long list of interests…

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KUDOS TO HEIDI DALLIN AND THE GLOUCESTER STAGE COMPANY FOR RECENT BOSTON GLOBE PRESS!!!

Gloucester Stage party Benny Ambush, Bob Walsh c Kim Smith

Benny Sato Ambush and Robert Walsh

Gloucester Stage kicks off new season with a party

By Eric Carlson

Gloucester Stage Company held its 37th Season Spring Celebration over the weekend, launching the new season in style with a silent auction, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and music by Boston cabaret artist Brian Patton. Attendees at the event, hosted at the home of Tom Burger and Andree Robert, included Gloucester Stage managing director Jeff Zinn, artistic director Robert Walsh, and Elizabeth Neumeier, president of the theater company’s board of directors.

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Today’s Google Doodle has Gloucester Ma connection

120th-anniversary-of-first-modern-olympic-games-google doodle

Today is the first day of track and field at O’Maley Innovation Middle School. On this 120th anniversary of the first day of the modern Olympics (thanks Google Doodle), may our student athletes be inspired by James Brendan Connolly. Before he was a Harvard spurner, a Veteran, a Gloucester Master Mariner, a sea tales chronicler and beloved writer,  James Connolly was one of 14 American athletes (5 were Bostonians) to compete in the international Games of the I Olympiad in Athens, Greece, 1896.Twenty percent of the international competitors were from the United States.

Connolly medalled. Twice. On the first final of the opening day, Connolly won what is now the triple jump and came in 2nd in the high jump. He sailed home a champion, the first Olympic medal winner in 1500 years. This recognition no doubt helped his byline and he rapidly gained a reputation as a fantastic writer. The Boston Globe published his first war correspondence, “Letters from the Front in Cuba” where he served with the Irish 9th Infantry of Massachusetts. His career soars after writing about Gloucestermen from his days working in Gloucester. I’ll let Connolly take it from here, it’s so good:

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Boston Globe complimenting Gloucester’s gorgeous WPA era murals

Boston_Globe_murals

Did you see? Wonderful John McElhenny’s My View article to the Gloucester Daily Times thanking great work by the CPA committee and residents? And more this week in the Boston Globe? Nice to be the successful model. “In Gloucester, residents have leveraged funding for 80 units of affordable elderly housing in an old grammar school, replaced historic lead glass windows at the Cape Ann Museum, and restored Depression-era WPA murals at City Hall.”  Read more of the Boston Globe article here

Since April is National Poetry month it seems extra fitting to pause on the Charles Allan Winter mural–which by the way is notoriously difficult to photograph in that site. Nice job by photographer Pat Greenhouse / Boston Globe.

In 1931, he and his wife Alice Beach Winter, also a successful artist, came to live in Gloucester year round having spent summers since 1914 and building their Mt. Pleasant studio  in 1922.  Poetry was the third mural Winter completed in Gloucester.

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BREAKING! OUR WHITE PELICAN STORY FEATURED ON WCVB CHANNEL 5 AND BOSTON GLOBE

Jamy Sessleman, WCVB reporter, saw the post on GMG and wrote requesting photo permission. Here is the link to the WCVB website:

http://www.wcvb.com/news/offcourse-white-pelican-spotted-on-north-shore/36519240

Thanks to Paul Morrison for letting us know the story was also picked up by the Globe:

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2015/11/18/what-was-pelican-doing-gloucester/t7bXx6AiPU0KonCsxnNQ6O/story.html

White pelican Massachusetts gloucester ©Kim Smith 11-16-15

Boston Globe lists Gloucester Schooner Festival in “10 Ways to Spend Labor Day Weekend in New England”

After this spectacular article in the New York Times a couple of weeks ago, it’s nice to see this piece in the Boston Globe’s travel section listing 10 Ways to Spend Labor Day Weekend in New England.

 

Boston Globe covers Berklee in Gloucester

Boston Globe correspondent, Wendy Killeen, lists Berklee in Gloucester in her weekly Arts/Entertainment column that appeared in the Globe North today.  Excerpt below:

JAZZ ON TAP: Berklee in Gloucester launches its season with a performance by The Jim Odgren Quintet at The Gloucester House on Thursday.

The series of concerts features professors from the Berklee College of Music in Boston and some of their top students. Proceeds benefit the Gloucester2Berklee Scholarship Fund, which helps send students from the city to the music college.

“Given all the Berklee students and alumni who live here, we feel that Berklee is somewhat responsible for Gloucester’s burgeoning music scene,” said Peter Van Ness of gimmeLIVE, producer of this season’s Berklee in Gloucester shows. “Normally, you’d only expect to see these concerts in a big city. You get to catch the best players in the world today as they train the best players of tomorrow.”

The jazz quintet is led by Berklee professors Jim Odgren on alto saxophone and Dave Santoro on acoustic bass. They are joined by Berklee student musicians Roberto Giaquinto on drums, Davis Whitfield on piano, and Lucian Gray on guitar.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 (cash only) at the door. Call 978-525-9093 or visit gimmesound.com. 

Read the full Boston Globe article here:

Chickity Check It! Gloucester 2.0 From Derrick Z. Jackson Boston Globe

Gloucester 2.0

By Derrick Z. Jackson Globe Columnist  

  August 09, 2012

GLOUCESTER

This town’s last national burst of buzz came from the movie version of “The Perfect Storm,” in which desperate fishermen going farther and farther out in search of dwindling stocks of swordfish were swept into the abyss by a hurricane. You may soon hear about Gloucester again, as visionary leaders chart out what they hope is a perfect scenario of renewal. There are still hundreds of working fishermen here, but officials now talk of Gloucester becoming a cluster for a much broader “marine economy.” Picture an aquatic Silicon Valley — a center of research on the “wired ocean” and a workshop for entrepreneurs developing products based on discoveries from the deep.

Gloucester Mayor Carolyn Kirk demonstrates how QR codes enable an interactive smartphoe tour along the city’s HarborWalk.

Wendy Maeda/Globe staff

Gloucester Mayor Carolyn Kirk demonstrates how QR codes enable an interactive smartphone tour along the city’s HarborWalk.

“This is what’s happening to the city, this is where we’re going,” vows Mayor Carolyn Kirk. “Come hell or high water, we’re going there.”

Touring the city this week, there was ample evidence that Gloucester can build on its seafaring heritage, even as it seeks to develop economic niches beyond fishing.

For the entre story click here

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