Tag Archives: Boston Globe

Boston Globe on Beauport, Biotech, Windover

“Fishing is going to be our heritage and first priority,” Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken said. But she added, “We’re moving forward.”

Kathleen Conti describes Gloucester Biotechnology Academy and Beauport Hotel as meaningful catalysts. In addition to the Mayor’s quote, there are comments  and points of view shared by several: Sherri Zizik; Vito Giacalone; Gregory Verdine; Ken Riehl, Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce (nice quote); Lee Dellicker, Winhover Construction (Beauport); George Marsh (architect Gloucester Biotechnology). Oh, and the former Mayor of New Bedford, John Bullard. chimes in.

Other new businesses downtown beyond this article include goodlinens opening July 1, Jane Deering Gallery on Pleasant Street, the new bicycle rental shop, and Tonno restaurant. And there’s a new gallery coming to Rocky Neck. More on that later!

 

boston globe jun 21 2016001

Read more

Art and money: Boston Creates chaos and Clara Wainwright Boston Globe op ed

A draft of the coveted 10 year master arts and culture plan for the City of Boston dropped in May a dud, despite– or because of –its $1.2 million price tag.  There’s a lot of pressure riding on Boston Creates final report, postponed until this coming Friday, June 17th. Boston is not alone in its struggles over funding and competing demands. Boston Creates and the ‘Art Czar’ fever did contribute to a climate of planning mana mania that found its way into Gloucester and other cities and towns. Boston Magazine writer Patti Harrigan profiled the year of Boston Creates, warts– no all in the article, “Boston’s Creative Crisis”:

Marty Walsh’s $1.4 million Boston Creates plan was supposed to turbocharge the city’s arts scene. A year after its launch, are we ever going to get anything other than a series of kumbaya sessions and generic platitudes?” 

She does a good job covering some of the reasons. I can add more.  Another perspective was an op-ed piece penned by Clara Wainwright for the Boston Globe. You may know her work with the celebrated 1998 quilt series: “Protecting the Oceans That God Has Created,” by Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association members including Lena Novello, Angela Sanfilippo, Fino Sanfilippo, and Nina Groppo. I am confident you have heard about another iconic project she established.

First Night founder and artist with Gloucester ties,  Clara Wainwright, weighs in on Boston Creates. Her column “A Way Forward for Boston Creates” was published on June 2, 2016, excerpt below:

Clara Wainwright

“Members of the arts community are praising Mayor Walsh’s Boston Creates, a 10-year master plan for the city’s cultural life, but are concerned about funding. The result of interviews with leaders of large and small arts organizations, and of community brainstorming in Boston’s neighborhoods, the Boston Creates report was directed by Julie Burros, the Mayor’s new cabinet-level chief of arts and culture. In presenting a draft of the report (the final is due to appear June 17), Burros pointed out the broad, rich scope of the plan, but warned that there was minimal funding to carry out some of its goals. I was again reminded of the recent Boston Foundation report that placed Boston last of 10 major cities’ support for the arts. Why such a sad warning, when Boston’s arts organizations and artists have been so clever and resourceful over the years?

In 1970 the Institute of Contemporary Arts invited city agencies and community organizations to come up with projects. The parks commissioner wanted a huge bell on Boston Common, which children could ring by swinging on its rope; a community health center wanted a mural for its waiting room. Artists were invited to choose one of many project ideas or submit a dream of their own. A large array of their ideas were exhibited in City Hall, which then had an art gallery. Mayor White’s Office of Cultural Affairs and the city’s financial community were encouraged to fund those selected. Boston Gas saw Corita Kent’s proposal for a billboard and commissioned her to paint a mural on one of its tanks.

Currently, Artists for Humanity provides instruction and small salaries to 200 high school students in a state-of-the-art building in South Boston. Zumix gives East Boston children musical instruction, the opportunity to perform, and a recording studio and a radio station. Both organizations were initiated by dynamic young women in the 1990s on minimal budgets. Some of their funding today comes from corporate commissions for murals, graphic work, and performances.

Read more

2016 Smart Growth conference #MSGA16

I’m in Worcester, MA, attending the 2016 Smart Growth Alliance conference (I was an invited speaker at a prior conference.)  The conference brings city planners, transportation and civic innovators, real estate and housing professionals, business leaders, non-profits, architects, Great Neighborhood and gateway cities, and –well, let’s just say a wide range of (primarily) policy folk.

It’s surprisingly enjoyable.

This year, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito is the key note speaker and we’ll hear from Worcester the host city. Other headliners include Michael Hogan President & CEO of AD Makepeace Company; Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport; Dan Burden the ‘walkability guru’; Parris Glendening former MD Governor and President of Smart Growth America’s Leadership Inst; Veronica Eady, VP Conservation Law Foundation; and Monica Tibbits-Nutt, Executive Director 128 Business Council. There will be more than 70 speakers. Attendees often fan out in groups to cover more panels.  I’ll report back where I’ve landed.

One topic that will swirl in the background concerns housing and a landmark bill S.122 proposing changes to planning, zoning and permitting. The organizers support this in a big way. Director Andre Leroux writes, “We believe that the (legislators) have done a thoughtful job balancing the needs of municipalities, developers, and the environment. “

With two-thirds of Millennials desiring to live in walkable, transit-accessible places at the same time that seniors shift to apartment living, suburban communities have a real test before them.  Communities like Newtonville need to decide between planned growth and unplanned growth. For its peers like West Concord village, Winchester Center, Andover and Newburyport, the future is already happening.” Quite a dishy prompt.

The Boston Globe endorsed the bill, you may have noticed the title: “Make Room for Granny, and other zoning fixes.” Granny does live longer than Grandpa.

Screenshot_060116_091859_PM

 

 

Boston Globe features Walter McGrath’s work at Gloucester’s Cove Hill Cemetery

Great story by Hattie Bernstein in the Globe today gives a shout out to Walter McGrath in Gloucester.

Boston Globe may 30 2016 grave guards

“If you go to a cemetery on Memorial Day, you’ll see flowers and flags planted everywhere and a lot more visitors than usual.

What won’t be obvious on this holiday dedicated to military veterans who died fighting in wars are the efforts of Northborough’s Beth Finch McCarthy, 53, Gloucester’s Walter McGrath, 83, and Jordan Hurley, 15, who lives in Middleborough.

The three are among an uncounted battalion of volunteers across the region who share a common pursuit: maintaining their communities and ensuring that those buried there aren’t forgotten.

McGrath, a retired engineer with a long list of interests…

Read more

KUDOS TO HEIDI DALLIN AND THE GLOUCESTER STAGE COMPANY FOR RECENT BOSTON GLOBE PRESS!!!

Gloucester Stage party Benny Ambush, Bob Walsh c Kim Smith

Benny Sato Ambush and Robert Walsh

Gloucester Stage kicks off new season with a party

By Eric Carlson

Gloucester Stage Company held its 37th Season Spring Celebration over the weekend, launching the new season in style with a silent auction, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and music by Boston cabaret artist Brian Patton. Attendees at the event, hosted at the home of Tom Burger and Andree Robert, included Gloucester Stage managing director Jeff Zinn, artistic director Robert Walsh, and Elizabeth Neumeier, president of the theater company’s board of directors.

Read more here.

Today’s Google Doodle has Gloucester Ma connection

120th-anniversary-of-first-modern-olympic-games-google doodle

Today is the first day of track and field at O’Maley Innovation Middle School. On this 120th anniversary of the first day of the modern Olympics (thanks Google Doodle), may our student athletes be inspired by James Brendan Connolly. Before he was a Harvard spurner, a Veteran, a Gloucester Master Mariner, a sea tales chronicler and beloved writer,  James Connolly was one of 14 American athletes (5 were Bostonians) to compete in the international Games of the I Olympiad in Athens, Greece, 1896.Twenty percent of the international competitors were from the United States.

Connolly medalled. Twice. On the first final of the opening day, Connolly won what is now the triple jump and came in 2nd in the high jump. He sailed home a champion, the first Olympic medal winner in 1500 years. This recognition no doubt helped his byline and he rapidly gained a reputation as a fantastic writer. The Boston Globe published his first war correspondence, “Letters from the Front in Cuba” where he served with the Irish 9th Infantry of Massachusetts. His career soars after writing about Gloucestermen from his days working in Gloucester. I’ll let Connolly take it from here, it’s so good:

Read more

Boston Globe complimenting Gloucester’s gorgeous WPA era murals

Boston_Globe_murals

Did you see? Wonderful John McElhenny’s My View article to the Gloucester Daily Times thanking great work by the CPA committee and residents? And more this week in the Boston Globe? Nice to be the successful model. “In Gloucester, residents have leveraged funding for 80 units of affordable elderly housing in an old grammar school, replaced historic lead glass windows at the Cape Ann Museum, and restored Depression-era WPA murals at City Hall.”  Read more of the Boston Globe article here

Since April is National Poetry month it seems extra fitting to pause on the Charles Allan Winter mural–which by the way is notoriously difficult to photograph in that site. Nice job by photographer Pat Greenhouse / Boston Globe.

In 1931, he and his wife Alice Beach Winter, also a successful artist, came to live in Gloucester year round having spent summers since 1914 and building their Mt. Pleasant studio  in 1922.  Poetry was the third mural Winter completed in Gloucester.

Read more

BREAKING! OUR WHITE PELICAN STORY FEATURED ON WCVB CHANNEL 5 AND BOSTON GLOBE

Jamy Sessleman, WCVB reporter, saw the post on GMG and wrote requesting photo permission. Here is the link to the WCVB website:

http://www.wcvb.com/news/offcourse-white-pelican-spotted-on-north-shore/36519240

Thanks to Paul Morrison for letting us know the story was also picked up by the Globe:

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2015/11/18/what-was-pelican-doing-gloucester/t7bXx6AiPU0KonCsxnNQ6O/story.html

White pelican Massachusetts gloucester ©Kim Smith 11-16-15

Boston Globe lists Gloucester Schooner Festival in “10 Ways to Spend Labor Day Weekend in New England”

After this spectacular article in the New York Times a couple of weeks ago, it’s nice to see this piece in the Boston Globe’s travel section listing 10 Ways to Spend Labor Day Weekend in New England.

 

Boston Globe covers Berklee in Gloucester

Boston Globe correspondent, Wendy Killeen, lists Berklee in Gloucester in her weekly Arts/Entertainment column that appeared in the Globe North today.  Excerpt below:

JAZZ ON TAP: Berklee in Gloucester launches its season with a performance by The Jim Odgren Quintet at The Gloucester House on Thursday.

The series of concerts features professors from the Berklee College of Music in Boston and some of their top students. Proceeds benefit the Gloucester2Berklee Scholarship Fund, which helps send students from the city to the music college.

“Given all the Berklee students and alumni who live here, we feel that Berklee is somewhat responsible for Gloucester’s burgeoning music scene,” said Peter Van Ness of gimmeLIVE, producer of this season’s Berklee in Gloucester shows. “Normally, you’d only expect to see these concerts in a big city. You get to catch the best players in the world today as they train the best players of tomorrow.”

The jazz quintet is led by Berklee professors Jim Odgren on alto saxophone and Dave Santoro on acoustic bass. They are joined by Berklee student musicians Roberto Giaquinto on drums, Davis Whitfield on piano, and Lucian Gray on guitar.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 (cash only) at the door. Call 978-525-9093 or visit gimmesound.com. 

Read the full Boston Globe article here:

Chickity Check It! Gloucester 2.0 From Derrick Z. Jackson Boston Globe

Gloucester 2.0

By Derrick Z. Jackson Globe Columnist  

  August 09, 2012

GLOUCESTER

This town’s last national burst of buzz came from the movie version of “The Perfect Storm,” in which desperate fishermen going farther and farther out in search of dwindling stocks of swordfish were swept into the abyss by a hurricane. You may soon hear about Gloucester again, as visionary leaders chart out what they hope is a perfect scenario of renewal. There are still hundreds of working fishermen here, but officials now talk of Gloucester becoming a cluster for a much broader “marine economy.” Picture an aquatic Silicon Valley — a center of research on the “wired ocean” and a workshop for entrepreneurs developing products based on discoveries from the deep.

Gloucester Mayor Carolyn Kirk demonstrates how QR codes enable an interactive smartphoe tour along the city’s HarborWalk.

Wendy Maeda/Globe staff

Gloucester Mayor Carolyn Kirk demonstrates how QR codes enable an interactive smartphone tour along the city’s HarborWalk.

“This is what’s happening to the city, this is where we’re going,” vows Mayor Carolyn Kirk. “Come hell or high water, we’re going there.”

Touring the city this week, there was ample evidence that Gloucester can build on its seafaring heritage, even as it seeks to develop economic niches beyond fishing.

For the entre story click here

Chickity Check It! Mayor Kirk Touts The Harborwalk In The Boston Globe Metro Section

image

Gloucester hopes to lure tourists with high-tech harborwalk

By David Filipov

|  GLOBE STAFF 

  JULY 19, 2012

GLOUCESTER — Among the weathered docks and fishermen’s shacks of this renowned port lives another Gloucester: a world of sea serpents and seafaring stories, world-renowned artists and beloved cultural icons.

The problem has always been how to find it. The working waterfront that supplies the city’s lifeblood also presents a maze of piers and industrial lots that are as difficult for visitors to navigate as they are crucial to Gloucester’s economy.

Next month, the city hopes to solve that problem with the opening of Gloucester Harborwalk, a 1.2-mile loop that brings to light previously hard-to-find historical and cultural lore and reunites the city’s main streets and its seaport. It does so with a network of 42 markers that is accompanied by a virtual tour that can be downloaded onto a smartphone.

City officials see the Harborwalk as a way to lure visitors who stop by for lobster, whale watching, or a trip to the beach into longer stays that will help drive the local economy.

Click here for the entire story and larger photo

Chickity Check It!- Terry Weber seARTS Article In The Boston Globe

Crafting an artsy reputation

Cape Ann recognized by AmericanStyle magazine

Joey Ciaramitaro of Captain Joe and Sons with Jacqueline Ganim-DeFalco (center) and Kristine Fisher, both of seARTS.

Photo-Lisa Poole for The Boston Globe

By Terry Weber

Globe Correspondent / June 23, 2011

When most people visualize Gloucester, they imagine a fisherman casting his nets, or the white sands of Good Harbor Beach, or the excitement of spotting a whale as it rises from the ocean’s depths. Now, thanks to many active artists and art organizations, Gloucester is on its way to reestablishing its reputation as a center for the arts.

The city made the grade as a popular arts destination in an article appearing in the summer edition of AmericanStyle magazine. Gloucester was ranked third in the small-city category with other cities that had a population below 100,000. The top two spots were taken by Asheville, N.C., and Santa Fe, respectively.

Click here for the entire article at The Boston Globe Website

My Buddy Terry Weber’s First Story Went Into The Globe Today!

Check it out when you get a second.

Blindness is no barrier to Lynn black-belt holder

Serguei Vassiliev, who is blind, tests for his black belt in aikido, throwing opponent John Murphy to the ground.

Serguei Vassiliev, who is blind, tests for his black belt in aikido, throwing opponent John Murphy to the ground. (Lisa Poole for The Boston Globe)

By Terry Weber

Globe Correspondent / April 14, 2011

Steven Rosenberg Talks With Scott Memhard In Boston Globe Article About Gloucester

Ice demand has melted away

Globe photo-

Scott Memhard of Cape Pond Ice has seen his harbor business drop by more than half.

Scott Memhard of Cape Pond Ice has seen his harbor business drop by more than half.

By Steven Rosenberg

Globe Staff / August 22, 2010

To read the entire article click here

thanks Chuck Cook for forwarding me the story

Boston Globe Caffeine Map Poll Omits Important Category- The Independents

In the Boston Globe’s Caffeine Poll in which they ask the question Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks they omit a hugely important category (well to me it is anyway)-THE INDEPENDENT COFFEE SHOPS!

Click the map for the Boston Globe Poll-

image

Personally I prefer Starbucks over Dunkin Donuts as I find DD to be weak and the people rarely make it the way I want it at DD and every once in a while I get one that tastes like burnt plastic.  But over both of those choices I would take The Lone Gull, Cape Ann Coffee or Pleasant St Tea and Coffee Company.

To leave the independent coffee shop out of the options for the poll I feel the poll is hugely flawed.

What about you?  I’ll add the right poll in here-