Tag Archives: Art

THE FISK CONNECTION | A PROGRESSIVE ORGAN CONCERT ON APRIL 14 Gloucester Meetinghouse UU and St. John’s

high res Fisk facade photoGloucester Meetinghouse Foundation shares news about its upcoming special event

“The the first half of the concert is performed on the historic 1893 Hutchings/Fisk organ in the Gloucester Meetinghouse (home of the Unitarian Universalist Church) and the second half is performed on the innovative 1989 C. B. Fisk organ in St. John’s Episcopal Church next door.  Six professional organists, related in various ways to Gloucester, will perform diverse repertoire on these two fine pipe-organs.  The concert will include narration about the work of Charles Fisk, the relationship of the players to the Fisk legacy, and a bit about how the two instruments sound.  A reception will follow the concert.”

Fisk Connection Organ Concert PosterRead the full press release Read more

What a low blow: Justice Lowy clears contested Berkshire Museum art for auction

Justice Lowy’s JUDGEMENT was released April 5, 2018. The Museum may sell Shuffleton’s Barbershop, and — via Sotheby’s– the remaining 39 works free of any restrictions.

“The museum has satisfied its burden of establishing that is has become impossible or impracticable to administer the Museum strictly in accordance with its chartiable purpose, thus entitling the Museum to relief under the doctrine of equitable deviation. Accordingly the court allows the Museum’s request for equitable relief to sell the designated artwork.”

Screenshot_20180405-151807~2.png

Justice Lowy MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING

page 1 MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING Justice Lowy Berkshire Museum and AGO April 5 2018

Reaction from Sotheby’s Auction House:

“We are very pleased that the court approved the agreement reached between the Berkshire Museum and the Massachusetts Attorney General. We look forward to working with the museum to ensure a bright future for the people of Pittsfield and Western Massachusetts.” Judge Lowy’s decision came in just in time to meet the auction’s press deadline clearing for art sales this spring, else sales would have been pushed back till the fall at the earliest. The catalogue pages are ready from last fall’s prep.

Reaction from Elizabeth McGraw, President, Berkshire Museum Board of Trustees:

“This is great news for the people of Berkshire County and everyone who visits the Berkshire Museum for one-of-a-kind experiences in history, art, and science. We recognize this decision may not please those who have opposed the museum’s plans. Still, we hope people will be able to move forward in a constructive way to help us secure and strengthen the future of this museum, at a time when our community needs it more than ever. “

Reaction from Save the Art – Save the Museum (STA-STM)

“Save the Art-Save the Museum continues to oppose the sale of the Berkshire Museum’s art treasures and its unrestricted use of the resulting funds. We also regret the judge’s disregard of the public trust in which the museum held its collections. The impending sale will not only diminish Pittsfield as a city claiming to be of cultural import to Berkshire County, but will reverberate destructively for years through collections similarly held in trust throughout the state and country. As a group, we will make a more detailed statement after meeting in person to consider the loss to our community and its impact.”

Patiner flight into egypt featured in 1953 article celebrating Berkshire Museum 50th celebration

1953

Have a look back at an inspiring 1965 Berkshire Eagle profile about Berkshire Museum Director Stuart C. Henry, and an earlier feature from the Berkshire Evening Eagle, published Thursday, Aug. 20, 1953, heralding the Berkshire Museum’s 50th anniversary. Both convey the museum’s seamless blend of high art, science, community and education.

I wonder what happened to the marble swans over the Berkshire Museum elliptical pool designed by A. Sterling Calder, father of the sculptor, Alexander Calder, and resident of Richmond, Massachusetts, less than 20 minutes away from Pittsfield?  Read more

Opening Day

Here’s a shot I had been thinking of doing for opening day,, being a huge Sox fan, and baseball fan. The feeling of home opener means a lot to me brings me back to when I was a kid playing baseball in the churchyard and down the fields or hair playing catch in the backyard,I know to some they have lost the passion because of all the big contracts and how expensive it is to spend a day at the ballpark,, all I have to say to those is grab a glove and ball a couple friends and just have a pick up game, I know that feeling will comeback!!

Let’s Go Redsox

Lanescove Shack

Sunset photo from Lanescove, this was a happy accident, walking from one side of the cove to the other I saw the colors behind the shack and trees so I climbed down the rocks since the tide was low I was able to frame this shot. First time I’ve seen this angle. Hope you guys like it, thank you

Please feel free to contact me if interested in purchasing any of my photos, website is in the works. I can be reached at (978) 559-1944

Berkshire Museum art case: Mass Supreme Court Justice Lowy allows third amicus brief

Amy Stewart, Second Assistant Clerk for the ‎Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court for the County of Suffolk, confirms that Justice Lowy has allowed a third Amici Curiae filed by Martin Gammon related to the Berkshire Museum case. Gammon has a new book coming out “Deaccessioning and its Discontents: A Critical History,” (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2018). He has long art world experience, and is an antiques roadshow appraiser and a former director of Museum Services at Bonhams auction house. Although he is opposed to the current deaccession agreement reached by the Attorney General and the Trustees of the Berkshire Museum, and backs off from the panic, Gammon articulates some sell-off, specifically:

“Consequently, if the court were to warrant a limited sale of the European and non-Western works, and that in turn proves to be insufficient for supporting operations in the course of time, then the trustees could then petition the court and consider some of the core American works for potential sale, but then they should be offered in a collaborative process through the auspices of the AAMD to other public institutions first, as the likelihood of another museum willing to acquire them is high, and they would in most cases remain in the public trust.”

Gammon underscores the irregularity of any deaccession planning with no curators on staff as is the case with the Berkshire Museum. One of the paintings Gammon muses a curator may have considered selling was the now infamous cover lot yanked back on the eve of the Sotheby’s November 21, 2017 sale: LOT 18 L’Agneau Nouveau (The Newborn Lamb), oil on canvas, presale estimate 1.5 to 2 million)

x Bouguereau LOT 18 Berkshire Museum Bouguereau featured on the cover of the Sotheby's catalogue 70 lots Nov 21 sale L'Agneau Nouveau-Ne THE NEWBORN LAMB oc 65 x 34 est 1500000 to 2mil

A poignant counter perspective was expressed in a Letter to the Editor on March 13, 2018: Crane gifts to museum would be painful loss, (aka “beyond the Rockwells) by David Peter Moser, a former resident of Pittsfield who benefited from amazing enrichment programs developed between the museum and community organizations

To the editor:
I am saddened by the potential loss of Berkshire County’s cultural assets, those being the gifts Zenas Crane made during his lifetime to his Berkshire Museum. Often overlooked in the press are those gifts associated with former Massachusetts governor and senator Winthrop Murray Crane, subject to being deaccessioned for cash. Governor (1900-1903) and senator (1904-1913), Winthrop Murray Crane and his family also donated works that are among the 40 to be sold, acquired over the last century as his heirs wanted to honor their direct ancestors and the mission of the Berkshire Museum. A native son of Dalton, both businessman and statesman, Winthrop Murray Crane is equally revered as part of this area’s proud heritage. Sen. Crane’s wife, Josephine Boardman Crane, and daughter, Louise Crane, gave art treasures either directly or through their nonprofit foundations. Louise Crane had no descendants.

Works include: William-Adolph Bouguereau’s “La Bourrique/The Horseback Ride;” Girolamo Troppa’s “Apollo and Satyr;” Thomas Wilmer Dewing’s “Two Ladies in a Drawing Room/The White Dress;” George Henry Durrie’s “Hunter in Winter Wood;” Adriaen Isenbrandt’s “Adam and Eve/The Temptation;” Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ “Diana of the Tower; ” Henry Moore’s “Three Seated Figures;” Edward Vuillard’s “Deux femmes dans un interieur;” and Edwin Lord Weeks’ “Indian Prince, Palace of Agra.”

The Josephine and Louise Crane Foundation, now located in Falmouth., has assets of over $70 million and gave $500,000 during the 2007 Berkshire Museum Capital Campaign. Attempts to reach out to the Winthrop Murray Crane ancestors regarding their feeling towards the Berkshire Museum’s intended renovation plans and deaccessioned artworks have gone unanswered.

As an aside, I thank Josephine Boardman Crane for also establishing the Junior Naturalist Program at the Berkshire Museum, which was an important part of my childhood learning experiences growing up in Pittsfield during the 1970s with Woody Bousquet and Thom Smith. My experiences, enhanced by visits to the Berkshire Museum as well as later hiking excursions through the hills of the Catskills and Berkshires with Woody, compelled me to study art history in college at Tufts University. Memories of the paintings by Hudson River School artists’ depictions of our beloved mountain ranges remain clear. Science, nature, history and art interconnected through paintings — treasures “once” known at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield.“- David Peter Moser

Moser was compelled to detail the strong accession stories and local community support for the Berkshire Museum 39– the works of art off the beaten press path. Justice Lowy asked about them, too.

Gammon filed one day ahead of the March 20th public hearing where parties and amici presented oral arguments. Although Gammon will not have an opportunity to present oral argument,  Justice Lowy will read and consider this file along with all the other documents. No further information is available at this time.

AMY STEWART FANTASTIC Boston MA John Adams Courthouse -Berkshire Museum deaccession case oral arguments before SJO Justice Judge Lowy_Mar 20 2018 _102144 © catherine ryan (17).jpg

03/28/2018      #24   Notice to counsel/parties regarding paper #18 file

MOTION For Leave To File A Brief Of Amicus Curiae filed by Martin Gammon. (No Certificate of Service included). (3/27/18: “Per the within, Motion is ALLOWED WITHOUT HEARING” (Lowy, J.))

Juni VanDyke street art public murals coming to Rose Baker Senior Center and more great news!

Juni VanDyke is busy working on a figurative mural series that will be installed along the Rogers side of Rose Baker Senior Center in Gloucester, Massachusetts. VanDyke resides in Cape Ann and has been the stellar Director of the arts program at Rose Baker Senior Center since 1993.  Her classes are Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, “elbow to elbow on Tuesdays and Thursday mornings, and in the afternoons.” All are welcome.

In addition to teaching art classes, she rotates exhibitions of art created by participants in the various art programs. Fine artist Mary McCarl and Helen Burgess will have their work on exhibit in the lobby of the senior center beginning April 4th though July 5th.

VanDyke is also curating the show “Closely Related” for Flatrocks gallery opening May 27 – June 24, 2018. The exhibit “attempts to identify and examine artistic elements that appear congruently in works by artists related by friendship or marriage, or by filial kinship, or by the duality of artist and place, or…other. Is our art influenced by our environment; our politics; the company we keep and/or by our generic connections? And is what we create truly unique? Or was Picasso right when he said: Every painting already has a mother and a father?” Exhibiting artists: Kathleen Archer, Shelly Champion, Loren Doucette, Paige Farrell, Jay McLaughlin, Barbara Moody, Hans Pundt, Lynne Sauselle, Patti Sullivan, Juni VanDyke

Juni Van Dyke working on new mural project for Rose Baker Senior Center

 

Juni Van Dyke discusses her Rose Baker Senior Center mural project ©c ryan March 2018 (2)

Phase II Rose Baker Senior Center site for a second new Juni Van Dyke mural  –after the lively figurative series is completed.

 

Juni’s geraniums at home and work- top floor windows at Rose Baker

Read more about Juni Van Dyke: Artist of such expressive power and spirit. Last year Room & Board commissioned art from Juni,  and her illustrations for children’s books were recognized by Cape Ann Reads and will be featured in a group exhibit in 2018. The collage media informed her approach with the Rogers Street series.

Larry O’Toole Amazing map and Historic murals at O’Maley School #GloucesterMA

Five monumental Larry O'Toole paintings circa 1948- reinstalled O'Maley School circa 1971 - Gloucester MA DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 wit

photo above- Five monumental Larry O’Toole (1909-1951) paintings circa 1948 were rescued and reinstalled O’Maley School circa 1982. Gloucester MA excellent DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 with ©c ryan.  Thank you DPW! City art is routinely checked. Photo by Phil Curcuru below- note the artist’s distinct “L” signature

Larry O'Toole signature photo by Phil Curcuru Gloucester MA DPW  #5 installed at O'Maley painting pre dates 1951.jpg

If you haven’t seen the series of five murals painted circa 1945 by fine artist and muralist, Larry O’Toole (1909-1951), that were rescued and installed (decades ago) at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, perhaps you’ve noticed a poster of his brilliant pictorial map around Cape Ann.

O’Toole published editions of the map in 1947 and 1948. Reproductions of “A Salty Map of Cape Ann: Gloucester-Magnolia-Rockport-Pigeon Cove-Lanesville-Bay View-Annisquam” the 1948 blue version are available at Cape Ann Museum shop.  The delightful map includes inventive and intricate details and local nods: a shout out to Ben Pine’s* wharf, “All maps like this have a sea serpent;” schooners like the Henry Ford and Gertrude Thebaud (again Pine); historic sites and characteristic scenes not to miss “Artists and Seagulls”; and upcoming landmarks to look forward to like the Annisquam Bridge slated for completion in 1950. The numbered border framing elements could have been inspired by Virginia Lee Burton.close up zoomable map (sold) can be found here 

 

Gloucester, Massachusetts Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner Gertrude Thebaud against the Canadian schooner Blue Nose for the fisherman trophy, one of the three men who made

Ben Pine office, 1941, Howard Liberman FSA/OWI photograph

Ben Pine* portrait by FSA/OWI photographer, Howard Liberman, titled “Gloucester, Massachusetts. Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner “Gertrude Thebaud” against the Canadian schooner “Blue Nose” for the fisherman’s trophy, is one of the three men who made Gloucester. The others were Tom Carrol and Ray Adams.” (author’s note: Ray Adams was a gal so the compliment is for two men and one woman…).

Art can be seen on the walls throughout the Gloucester Mariner’s Association in Howard Liberman’s faint photos from 1941. I’m looking for more interior shots. Some of the art could be O’Toole’s, who completed commissions for Pine.

Carved fish models at the Gloucester’s Mariners Association (Fishermen’s Institute)

Howard Liberman FSA photo Gloucester Mariners Association.jpg

 

Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental Group Opens Eighth Show…in Gloucester!

Jeff Grassie_Entrapment_ 20x30_ sculpture

PRESS RELEASE 
What: Unexpected No. 8 Exhibit – www.experimentalartgroup.com 
featuring Rockport Art Association & Museum artists and contributing members
When:  
April 2-April 30, 2018
Reception Saturday April 7, 5-7 pm
Where: NOTE VENUE Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental group show at Charles Fine Art Gallery in Gloucester, 196 Main Street, Gloucester, MA

The Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental Group opens its eighth group exhibition, “Unexpected No. Eight” at Charles Fine Arts Gallery, 196 Main Street, Gloucester, MA 978.559.7762.  This juried show features artworks of both the RAA&M’s artists and contributing members. Works on view in the exhibition range in medium to include paintings, mixed-media, graphics, sculpture and photography.  The exhibition runs from April 2 through April 30, with an Artist Reception on Saturday, April 7 from 5-7 pm. There will also be a gallery talk by Jeff Grassie held on April 12 at 7pm.  Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 1-5 pm or by appointment. Closed Monday.

The Experimental Group is a creative forum, its main mission is to increase public awareness and to foster self-expression by bringing artists together to explore and share ideas that cultivate creative freedom. The EG is encouraged and supported by the Rockport Art Association & Museum. 

If you would like more information about the exhibition, would like to schedule an interview and a walk through, or need additional promotional images please contact: Nella Lush, Experimental Group, Chair, 978.886.4582 or via email experimentalgroupraa@gmail.com 

Rockport Art Association & Museum, 12 Main Street, Rockport, MA 01930  (RAA&M) is one of the oldest and most active art organizations in the country. The Association has a long and distinguished history that has spanned 96 years.

 

Listen for #GloucesterMA on the radio! Mass Cultural Council’s WCRB, WBUR, WICN and NEPR spots for Cultural Districts start next week 📻🎙️😊

Last year, the Mass Cultural Council purchased series of 10, 20, and 30 second spots on WCRB, WGBH, WBUR, WICN, and NEPR to promote each of the Massachusetts designated Cultural Districts,” Meri Jenkins explained. They’re doing it again for 2018. Beginning next week, you may hear radio commercials wishing Gloucester and its two cultural districts great success in 2018 (Downtown Cultural District and Rocky Neck cultural district). Email Mayor Romeo Theken’s arts hotline: sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov (subject line MCC radio spots) with the day and time you heard “Gloucester”, where you were and what you think.

Some of the radio spots are scheduled during the following shows

  • Two (2) WFCR News spots rotating thru Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace – Monday thru Saturday
  • Two (2) WFCR Run of Station spots rotating thru Classical Music, Jazz and Entertainment programing – Monday thru Saturday
  • TWO (2) WNNZ News Network spots rotating Monday thru Saturday
  • TWO (2) WNNZ News Network BONUS spots rotating Monday thru Sunday

The MCC is also expanding outreach thru increased collaboration with the state’s office of Travel and Tourism. See Massachusetts excellent and popular travel site. 

The Gloucester page has not been edited, yet–it’s just a placeholder. We can edit and businesses can add in. The calendar is an exciting opportunity integrated with the interactive cultural districts map and information. I’m hoping the GMG and chamber calendars can just be synced up.

MCC new landing page on MOTT ma vacation

Justice Lowy to Berkshire Museum Attorney Lee at Massachusetts Supreme Court: “So in other words, I have to tell you, I’m watching two different movies.”

In 2017, the Berkshire Museum was sued multiple times because of the possible sales of 40 works of art at public auctions. The art has long left the building. The winning consignor, Sotheby’s auction house, received all property prior to the 2017 public announcement from museum leadership blowing its “New Vision” horn. The art remains on hold at Sotheby’s.

At high noon on March 20, 2018, in Courtroom 2 of the John Adams Courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts, Justice David Lowy presided over the ongoing Berkshire Museum deaccession litigation. Four attorneys, two for each side, were summoned before the Massachusetts Supreme Court to argue positions. Justice Lowy began the hearing by addressing the elephant in the room. He announced that because the Attorney General Office and the Berkshire Museum, former adversaries, petitioned the court together for necessary relief, he thought it was important to hear opposing views. Therefore, he invited amici to present their arguments, too.

(A third amicus brief by a former director of Museum Services at Bonhams auction house, Martin Gammon,  has since been filed and is under review.)

Naturally, this hearing was welcome news for opponents of the museum’s plans to liquidate a priceless core collection in favor of a makeover, still reeling from their perception that the Attorney General abdicated mightily February 9, 2018. Trustees, who believe the museum is broke and will shutter any day if not for this new strategy, were disheartened but determined.

Justice Lowy made the stunning announcement upfront that restrictions do apply, and are a given. The Office of the Attorney General (AGO) and the Supreme Court agree about standing. The museum maintains it has the right to liquidate. The only way that any art can be sold is if the legal contracts pertaining to the Berkshire Museum’s charter and mission and provenance for the art are abandoned because the museum successfully conveys its pending demise. Then it gets a do-over. The legal term is cy pres (pronounced say, pray. I prefer pray stay!)

IF sold, Norman Rockwell’s Shuffleton’s Barbershop, which has crystal clear provenance, was estimated  to fetch  the highest price at auction. Inexplicably, the petition before the court boasted of a breezy compromise between the AGO and Berkshire Museum: an anonymous museum will purchase the painting for 1)an undisclosed price (I guarantee that it’s less than public auction), 2) promises a temporary display in Massachusetts, at the Norman Rockwell Museum, and 3)eventually feature it as part of the mystery museum’s permanent collection. Where is the museum? What is the sale price and terms? If its destiny is beyond a Massachusetts border, why isn’t the Commonwealth protecting its resources?*

*Which museum committed funds for Shuffleton Barbershop  and can afford to pounce and avoid driving up the price at auction? Perhaps Crystal Bridges Museum backed by Wal-Mart heiress, Alice Walton, could strike again. Norman Rockwell is already represented in its collection. Is it worth it to add another? The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art could be a contender. George Lucas boasts an impressive Rockwell collection, including ideal examples with cinematic connections or narratives, like the stunning study for charwomen (in movie theater). Is that enough representation to let it go were Berkshire Museum Rockwells cleared to sell?

The other works of art could be sold, or not. One doesn’t get the impression that the AGO was stepping in for the underdog. Leave it to Norman Rockwell to capture the attention of a busy world to illustrate a simple maxim: do the right thing. If legal manuevering is necessary, like crazy zoning variances for unfair construction, most collections will be at a disadvantage. It’s up to the Massachusetts Supreme Court to remedy this balderdash & betrayal else risk breaking the bank of non profits across the country.

Justice Lowy asked that the attorneys focus their arguments on selling with restrictions: “Is it necessary and impossible or impracticable for the Museum’s charitable mission to continue?” All parties stuck to this request, and to their filed briefs more or less. I tried to capture word for word the moments when Justice Lowy interrupted rote statements. Justice Lowy has made no decisions, yet. Eventually, he will decide whether to allow the parties’ petition, deny it, or reserve and report which means bringing the case back to the full court.

Proponents side or Opponents side?

Upon arrival, where to sit at the courtroom felt like where to sit at a wedding. The Berkshire Museum Trustees, Director Van Shields, and those in favor of the Berkshire Museum deaccession sale sat together on the left side of the courtroom. Opponents, numbering 2:1, sat in the center, off to the right, and spilled into the hall. With every available chair claimed some were left standing in the back.

TRUSTEES few smiles - Boston MA John Adams Courthouse -Berkshire Museum deaccession case oral arguments before SJO Justice Judge Lowy_Mar 20 2018 _102144 © catherine ryan (12)

Berkshire Museum Trustees March 20, 2018 at Massachusetts Supreme Court (front row far left Director Van Shields seated next to Trustees Chair Elizabeth McGraw)

Up first – Attorney Nicholas M. O’Donnell

of Sullivan & Worcester LLP law firm and Erika Todd on behalf of ‘Berkshire Museum Member Plaintiffs’: James Hatt,  Kristin Hatt,  and Elizabeth Weinberg 

ATTORNEY O'DONNELL AMICUS GOES FIRST Boston MA John Adams Courthouse -Berkshire Museum deaccession case oral arguments before SJO Justice Judge Lowy_Mar 20 2018 _102144 © catherine ryan

O’Donnell excerpt- “Massachusetts stands alone, this decision puts Massachusetts alone …That this court, this petition, this hearing, may be the ONLY obstacle left to account for this action should be unimaginable. IF a conclusory report of operational deficits can support the liquidation for the sale…Make no mistake, I say the art market is watching–”

Justice Lowy cut in- “Maybe they are. I’ve certainly read your key points, Maybe not. Systemic issues that flow from this are not my focus…”

Read more

Doors open for #BerkshireMuseum case John Adams Courthouse

People are streaming in and filling seats like guests at a wedding– proponents of the sale like Berkshire Museum director Van Shields and Trustees are seated together on the left.

Attorneys greet and shake hands like team captains before a big game.

IMG_20180320_112505.jpg
Read more

Magnolia Pier

One of my most photographed subjects is the magnolia pier. Seeing it in its current state makes me sad but I know the people involved in the reconstruction will get her back to normal as soon as they can. For those that don’t know the Pier was severely damaged during the last few storms with damaging surf dismantling it making it unsafe .

Berkshire Museum court case today – order for oral arguments as follows

John Adams Courthouse Superior Court Boston MA_20180301_© C Ryan (8)_105946 (1)

Courtroom 2 at John Adams Courthouse is quiet now but come noon today the Berkshire Museum deaccession  art case will have it’s next day in court, this time the highest in the Commonwealth.

Attorneys for Parties (The Trustees Berkshire Museum and Massachusetts AGO) vs. Amici (Patti and Hatt groups) will present as follows:

Amici will go first  Tom Patti and Hatt groups, then AGO, and Trustees last. Justice Lowy can decide to allow the patries’ petition, deny it, or reserve and report which means bringing the case back to the full court.

Read more

Summer Dreaming

Waking up early this morning to go catch sunrise I heard the wind and decided to not go shoot,, yes I’m a fair weather photographer, well only when it’s March and the temperatures in the teens with wind chill.. I hope you enjoy this sunset shot from Colby Farm taken last September

Beacon Sunset

Driving around the back shore in Gloucester there are so many incredible views of our gorgeous town, this scene is no different. As I approached the Beacon Marine the light was changing fast I knew there wasn’t much time so I quickly pulled over and grabbed gear and set up through the railings just in time,

« Older Entries Recent Entries »