Category Archives: Working Boats

SNAPSHOTS FROM DOCUMENTARY FILM “DEAD IN THE WATER” WORLD PREMIERE

Photos and clip of Senator Bruce Tarr poignant response about the embattled fishing industry at the premiere of Dead in the Water, which was held last night at the Rockport High School auditorium. Director and producer, David Whittkower, is a graduate of Rockport High School and this is the second film he has premiered at Rockport. Save the date for the next local showing of the film, which will be held at the Cape Ann Museum on February 10th, 2018.

Tonia, Andrew, and David Whittkower  

Mark Ring, David Laveille, Al Cotone, and Paul VitaleSelma Bell and Nina Groppo

 

Salvi Benson, the greatest of all time and winner of ten Greasy Pole Championships (four Saturday and six Sunday)

DOCUMENTARY #GLOUCESTERMA “DEAD IN THE WATER” IS OUTSTANDING AND SUPER EXCITING NEWS: SAVE THE DATE FOR THE FILM’S CAPE ANN MUEUM SCREENING!!!

Producers John Bell and Angela Sanfilippo with Filmmaker David Whittkower

Dead in the Water, a documentary film by David Whittkower, premiered at the Rockport High School auditorium this afternoon. Photos and video clips of the Q and A will be posted tomorrow.

Save the date for the next local showing, which will be at the Cape Ann Museum on February 10th, 2018. This film is a must see for every member of our community and will inspire you to take an active role in helping to preserve our most treasured and valuable resource. Without the help of the entire community, the industry will soon be Dead in the Water.

BREAKING: DRAMATIC CAPTURE ANNE ROWE FREED!

For a few moments she was on her side and I think I could hear my heartbeat. She righted herself, was towed away from the rocks by Unity, and headed home by her own power. 

The Anne Rowe became grounded at about 4:30am. Crew members self-evacuated onto the rocks as the Coast Guard was dispatched. Rescuers waited until near high tide before towing. The Anne Rowe was safely towed off the rocks by Unity at about 2:00pm, an hour before high tide.

Anne Rowe Heading Home Eastern Point Lighthouse and Mother Ann

BREAKING: LOBSTER BOAT ANNE ROWE GROUNDED ON EASTERN POINT

Anne Rowe grounded on Gloucester’s backshore at Eastern Point. The crew self-evacuated and the Coast Guard is waiting for the tide.

Lobster Boat Anne Rowe grounded on the backshore #gloucesterma #fishingboat #lobster

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Rambling Rose and Lady J on the scene.

This is very close to where The Miss Fern went aground a couple years back-

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COAST GUARD STATIONED AT THE DOGBAR BREAKWATER THIS AFTERNOON

 Curious to see the Coast Guard ship parked at the Dogbar for a good part of the afternoon.

VINTAGE SHORT FILM CLIP OF GLOUCESTER IN 1955 WHEN “A MILLION POUNDS OF FISH A DAY” WAS THE CATCH

Thanks so much to Pat Dalpiaz for sharing this classic footage of Gloucester’s working waterfront, with the carillon bells of Our Lady of Good Voyage playing in the distance.

BEAUTIFUL AND ATMOSPHERIC FOG DESCENDING OVER EASTERN POINT

FV Endeavor in the Foggy Sunset

Heading out to photograph wild creatures, instead I found fog. Beginning in the afternoon and lasting into sunset, waves and ribbons of fog enveloped the east end of Gloucester until only shapes and silhouettes were visible.

Fog Ribbons and FV Endeavor

A wedding reception was underway at the Yacht Club, lots of folks were out watching the setting sun, and a photo shoot was taking place on the Dogbar. Returning home, Niles Beach and Ten Pound Island were even more shrouded in fog. Final stop was the Paint Factory to catch the last glimmer of light. Looking towards Ten Pound Island from the Paint Factory, in the last Instagram you can see the sliver of a crescent moon.

Great Auk #foggynight #gloucesterma

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Paint Factory #foggynight #gloucesterma

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Ten Pound Island #foggynight #gloucesterma

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CAPTAIN MARC AND SAM FRONTIERO OF THE FV CAPT. NOVELLO HEADING OUT INTO THE FOG

A foggy Sunday morning and the captain and crew of the FV Capt. Novello are hard at work preparing for a day of fishing.

Heading Out Into the Fog

SCHOONERS ADVENTURE AND COLUMBIA IN THE BLUE HOUR

Anticipation is building for Gloucester’s fabulous and beautiful Schooner Festival. After a year and a half of Harbor renovations it is a joy to see Schooner Adventure and Schooner Ardelle return to their home at Maritime Gloucester.Schooner Columbia will be berthed next to the Adventure during the 2017 Schooner Festival, as she has in previous years, save for last year’s Festival. Friday’s schedule is as follows:

Friday, September 1, 2017

All Day Arrival of Participating Vessels.

5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Mayor’s Reception for invited guests (ticketed event)

6:00 pm to 10:00 pm
Gloucester Block Party on Main Street in downtown.

Schooner Adventure Crew

Schooner Columbia

 

Check here for the 2017 Schooner Festival schedule of events.

Compass Rose ~ Bronze and glass sculpture by Mark Read, Maritime Gloucester

Cape Ann’s Schooners
 Adventure, Flagship of the City of Gloucester and leading the Parade of Sail
 Thomas E. Lannon, honoring her namesake– a fisherman from 1901-1943
 Ardelle flagship for Maritime Gloucester.
 Bald EagleGreen Dragon  and Sugar Babe from Gloucester
 Redbird & Lewis H. Story from Essex.  View of the Paint Factory from Maritime Gloucester

FOGGY MORNING DAYBREAK ON GLOUCESTER’S BACK SHORE WITH TOBY BURNHAM’S LOBSTER BOAT JUPITER II

Toby Burnham, also known as The Seagull Whisperer, and his lobster boat the Jupiter II, spotted along the Back Shore.

Toby Burnham The Seagull Whisperer

HUGE SHOUT OUT TO WICKED TUNA’S CAPTAIN DAVE AND NANCY MARCIANO

After yesterday taking a group of 70 veterans and their invited guests on a fishing trip aboard Captain Tom Orrell’s Yankee Freedom, Captain Dave and Nancy went fishing today with a ship full of local fishermen and fans.

No greater fan than Michael, who was waiting far ahead of the scheduled departure for an autograph from Captain Dave. Autograph in hand, just look at that ear to ear grin!

You can read more about Captain Dave’s efforts on behalf of Wounded Warriors in a previous post: Wounded Warriors with Captain Dave and Nancy Marciano Aboard the Yankee Fleet Celebrate Fourth of July 

 

LAUNCH PARTY TODAY FOR THE LEWIS H. STORY AT THE ESSEX SHIPBUILDING MUSEUM!

Join us as we celebrate the re-launch of the Museum’s Flagship, the Lewis H. Story!  Music, food, libations and family activities in the Shipyard, it will be a great way to kick off the summer season. Saturday, June 4th, at 4pm at the Essex Shipbulding Museum.

Photo: Wooden Boat Magazine

HISTORY OF THE LEWIS H. STORY from the Essex Shipbuilding Museum website

In 1998, the Essex Historical Society and Shipbuilding Museum commissioned Essex builder Harold Burnham to construct a Chebacco to serve as the museum’s flagship. She measures 30 feet on deck and her hull, deck arrangement and rig are typical of post-Revolutionary War inshore fishermen.

The STORY is named in honor of Essex shipwright, carver, designer, modeler, researcher and the town’s foremost maritime historian, Lewis H. Story, 1873-1948.  All contemporary studies of Essex history and the design of the American fishing schooner are based on his life-long study and scholarship.

THE CHEBACCO BOAT

Image of Revolutionary War DogbodyDuring the American Revolution, the British nearly destroyed the New England fishing fleet. Since capital was lacking to build replacement schooners, a low-cost, quickly built vessel was needed. A little two-masted boat, then popular for the inshore fishery, seemed to fit the bill. Because it was developed in Essex which was then a parish of Ipswich called “Chebacco”, the vessel was known as a “Chebacco Boat” if pink sterned (pointed) and “Chebacco Dogbody” if square sterned (the origin of the term “Dogbody” is not known).

Chebacco Boats were built by the hundreds not only in Essex, but in other coastal towns as well. Typically, they measured between 22 and 30 tons and averaged from 24 to 48 feet in length, had two masts and no bowsprit. They were usually a flush-deck vessel with several cockpits, or “standing rooms” in which the fishermen stood to fish. A middle hatch gave access to the fish hold.

Local Essex tradition has it that the first Chebacco Boat was built in the attic of a house. This is likely more legend than fact. However, Chebaccos were almost always built near the dwelling of the builder and sometimes no more than a few yards from the front door. When finished, the boats were loaded onto pairs of wooden wheels and hauled to the launch-site by teams of oxen. Boat hauling went out of favor about the year 1835. Thereafter, all Essex vessels were built on the river’s edge.

There are Chebacco boats building for the Bay Fishery not only at every landing place, but in the yards of farmers some distance from the shore“.

1817, The Reverend William Bentley, of Salem

WELCOME HOME SCHOONER ADVENTURE!

It was a grand day for the Schooner Adventure and Maritime Gloucester as our beautiful National Historic Landmark has returned to her home berth at the Maritime center. The reconstructed pier looks fantastic, and ready for a summer of fabulous fun and educational experiences. Come on down and check out the pier and see the Adventure back at home. Click here for Schooner Adventure’s exciting calendar of upcoming events and summer programs, as well as here for news and noteworthy activities at Maritime GloucesterCaptain Willy Leathers and Crew
Don Boye, Captain Stefan Edick, Michael Bergmann, and Steve Parks

Moving the float from the Jodrey Fish Pier across the Harbor to Maritime Gloucester pier.

YANKEE MAGAZINE FEATURES SCOTT MEMHARD AND CAPE POND ICE!!

YANKEE MAGAZINE FEATURES SCOTT MEMHARD AND CAPE POND ICE!!

Behind-the-Scenes Factory Tours | The Best 5

 

Article and photo by Kim Knox Beckius

Want to see Yankee ingenuity in action? Go behind the scenes on a factory tour. “Made in New England” pride thrives at factories that produce everything from frozen commodities to cuddly gifts guaranteed to melt hearts. As a piano or a naval destroyer takes shape before your eyes, you’ll realize anything built to last requires one component that can’t be manufactured: passion.

Cape Pond Ice
Gloucester, Massachusetts

When Cape Pond Ice was founded in 1848, Mother Nature provided the refrigeration. These days, giant blocks of ice aren’t harvested from local ponds; they’re manufactured. On ice house tours year-round, you can watch the “coolest guys around” turn water into cold, hard cash. Inside this frosty factory, where 300 tons of ice are produced daily, antique hydraulic block upenders are everyday tools, and ice sculptures survive for decades. Cape Pond’s diverse product line includes everything from ice shot luges to three grades of chopped ice critical to Gloucester’s fishing industry. Plus, more than 15 years after actor John Hawkes wore a Cape Pond Ice T-shirt in The Perfect Storm, sales of logo wear still account for nearly 10 percent of revenues.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

VIDEO ‘PERFECT STORM’ RESCUE SHIP SUNK OFF NEW JERSEY COAST

Drone captures dramatic sinking of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Tamaroa, formerly the Navy fleet tug Zuni, at the Del-Jersey-Land Inshore Reef. The reef is located 26 nautical miles southeast of Cape May. (Video by Andre Malok and Craig McCarthy | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

By Craig McCarthy | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
MAY 10, 2017

A famed Coast Guard cutter and former Navy tug has entered its third tour of duty as it now sits 135 feet below sea level off the coast of New Jersey, creating a destination for divers and adding to an already thriving ecosystem of marine life.

The Tamaroa, famously featured in the book and movie “The Perfect Storm” –where its crew saved three from a sailboat caught in the storm and four of five members of the Air National Guard whose helicopter had ran out of fuel– was first commissioned by the U.S. Navy in 1943 as the Zuni and tugged torpedoed ships to safety during the assault on Iwo Jima.

“Now she’ll serve forever,” said Rollie LeDoux, who was stationed on the ship 35 years ago. “It’s sad to see her go, but it’s better than her becoming some beer cans.”

Planning began last summer to scuttle the Tamaroa, which was retired in 1994 after nearly 50 years on the seas. The 205-foot ship began its trip to waters off the Jersey coast Monday night after it was towed to Suffolk, Va., where it was cleaned and prepared for its sinking.

Shortly after 1 p.m. Wednesday, The Tamaroa was on her way to join up with the largest vessel ever deployed on the East Coast, a 563-foot destroyer, in the artificial reef off Cape May Wednesday afternoon.

“It could last for 100 years, creating a marine environment for fisherman and the diving community,” said Peter Clarke, who coordinates the artificial reef program at the state’s Department of Environmental Protection. Clarke said the site where the Tamaroa was sunk has attracted a variety of fish, including mako shark, blue fish and tuna.

“She’ll be serving long after I’m gone,” LeDoux said.

Read More Here

BEAUTIFUL CAPE ANN FOGGY DAYS

Greater Yellowlegs foraging in the marsh.

I have loved this past month’s atmospheric and textured, misty April weather. Do you recall an April as foggy? I don’t. Whenever out and about and a spare moment was mine, I grabbed my camera and had a go at capturing beautiful fog-shrouded Cape Ann.

Piping Plover

Trying out the new teleconverter–note the little tiny figure fishing on the breakwater in the photo on the left, which was shot at 18mm, and then with the 400mm lens plus tele.

Same focal lengths with Ten Pound Island.

And then the sun came out.

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