Category Archives: gloucester


cape-ann-plein-air-painter-andre-lucero-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithAndre Lucero

Last night after sundown I took our sweet pooch Rosie for a walk down Pirate’s Lane. There were not one, nor several, but five Cape Ann Plein Air painters stationed around the docks and all facing towards Rocky Neck and the Inner Harbor. I didn’t want to disturb them too much as they appeared to be racing against the fading light but if you click on the captions, you can learn more about each of these master painters and see galleries of their work. Read more about the Cape Ann Plein Air event here.

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-eric-jacobsen-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithEric Jacobsen

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-patrick-lee-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithPatrick Lee

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-neal-hughes-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithNeal Hughes

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-mitch-baird-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithMitch Baird



Dave Sag’s Blues Party tonight to host Diane Blue, Ricky “King” Russell and Ed Scheer 8:30pm 10.13.2016 There’s gonna be whole lotta shakin going on!


Diane Blue. She’s a fireball of intergalactic rocket fuel,and no fool, either. Watch flames erupt from her harmonica as she thrills you with her cantankerous systemic vibrosis! Watch mere ordinary world-famous vocalists cringe as she lets loose with her four dimensional uvula! You’ll need your Ridalin!

Diane Blue
And she’s dragging in kicking and screaming two of your favorite (and mine!) mooseicians to tickle your brain stem. First, Mr. Ricky “King” Russell, mastermind of the Boston Blooze Scene,will be in the glitar chair ,safely fastened for that burning sensation. Then there’s “Mr.” Edd Scheer, our diaphanous yet protophonic swamp popper, on the skins. and me two, on base. Ommm…..
It just doesn’t get any better than this. I mean it!

Dave Sag…


40 Railroad Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930
(978) 283-9732


schooner-lynx-gloucester-boston-skyline-copyright-kim-smithExciting news–the Schooner Lynx will be returning to Gloucester next year for the Schooner fest! The captain of the Lynx, Donald Peacock, wrote the following, “Thank you for noticing Lynx in your harbor. Gloucester Marine Railways have been most hospitable and we look forward to returning for Lynx 2017 yard period and the 2017 Gloucester Schooner Race and Festival.”

A magnificent ship under sail, she was a joy to watch and to photograph as she moved through the Harbor, setting course for Saint Petersburg, Florida, via Portland, Maine. You can see in the last photo that by the time she was passing Brace Cove she was under full sail with her square sail hoisted too. Safe travels Schooner Lynx and crew!

schooner-lynx-gloucester-mast-crane-piling-copyright-kim-smithAt the Railways this morning with crew members Casey and Hunter

schooner-lynx-gloucester-ten-pound-island-copyright-kim-smithPassing Ten Pound Island -note how much taller the Schooner is to the Lighthouse


Along the backshore with Boston in the distanceschooner-lynx-brace-rock-copyright-kim-smith

schooner-lynx-gloucester-brace-cove-copyright-kim-smithBrace Cove


roys-boys-gloucester-harbor-copyright-kim-smithTugboat Roys Boys moving through Gloucester Harbor this morning 

An excellent website for tugboat enthusiasts:

“Roys Boys was built in 1967, by the Morehead Marine Corporation of Morehead City, North Carolina, as the Cap’n Ed for the Norfolk Dredging Corporation of Norfolk, Virginia.

In 2016, the tug was acquired by the Tucker Roy Marine Towing and Salvage Incorporated of Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. Where she was renamed as the Roy Boys.

She is a twin screw tug, rated at 900 horsepower.”roys-boys-gloucester-fort-harbor-copyright-kim-smithroys-boys-gloucester-harbor-martime-gloucester-2-copyright-kim-smith

roys-boys-gloucester-harbor-maritime-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithA photo of her when she was the Cap’n Ed–don’t you think she’s so much sharper looking today? 12497


poison-ivy-vine-in-fall-toxicodendron-radicans-copyright-kim-smithPoison Ivy Run Amok

Oh how pretty! Doesn’t this bucolic scene look interesting? I had to stop and take a photo. And then began to walk toward, wanting a closer look, before catching myself. If poison ivy even looks at me, or I look at it, that most unpleasant of itchy rashes finds a home on my person.

Poison ivy is in full glorious color right now, dissipating in shades of golden yellow, tangerine, and crimson scarlet. The oils found in the foliage and stems are just as potent at this time of year as they are during the summer months.

poison-ivy-in-autumn-toxicodendron-radicans-copyright-kim-smithLeaves of three, let it be, 

Berries white, run in fright,

Red hairy vine, no friend of mine!

Cape Ann shores and meadows are rife with poison ivy and the best defense is to recognize the leaves and wear protective clothing. Not a plant one desires for the home garden, it is an important bee and bird food. The flowers provide nectar for pollinators in the spring and the small white berries are a winter staple for our some of our most beloved songbirds, including American Robins, Northern Cardinals, and Mockingbirds.



From a post on Tony’s website:

drydockafterhours-1000x675Painting of a Boat in Drydock

It’s funny, but I’m not sure whether to consider this a landscape, seascape or “nautical”.  Certainly the theme is nautical. There are no sea or land elements in the painting, but there is a boat – so I guess it’s a nautical!
I was able to enjoy four days of painting in the Cape Ann area of Massachusetts recently.  Cape Ann includes the picturesque shore towns of Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester-by-the-Sea and Annisquam.  It’s one of my favorite places and one of my favorite places to paint.  One evening, my friend and fellow painter John Caggiano and I set out for the Gloucester Marine Railways. It’s an odd name for a ship repair and drydock company, which is what it really is.  But whatever it is named, it is a great place to paint since there are always a variety of boats up for repair.

The Phyllis A

One boat in particular is the “Phyllis A“.  It is Gloucester’s oldest fishing vessel and has been preserved to promote the history of gill-net fishing in Gloucester. Visit the website for the Phyllis A here – and donate to the cause if you have a mind. I’ve seen it a number of times while visiting the shipyard.  Although it actually spends a great deal of time in the water, I happen to have seen it out of the water, in drydock, three times in the last three years. This sketch was done in July 2012, up in the very same drydock as the painting shown above. The sketch was actually done in the morning, while this latest painting was done in the evening.

As an old boat, it is in constant need of repair, and is also in the process of restoration, so it spends a lot of time in drydock, I suppose.

The latest painting

We visited the yard one evening and set up with the light disappearing rapidly – more rapidly than we had anticipated.  The Phyllis A was up in drydock and in the exact same place as I found her in July 2012.  There was another boat – a modern fishing boat – up in the dock next door.

The sun was sinking in the sky but still shining on most of the yard.  I set up in the shadow of a crane so that I had a good view of the Phyllis A and it’s mate in the next dock, but on their shady sides. The sun was just catching the front edge of the cabin and the roof over hang cast a shadow across the side. Most of the rest of the boat was in shade, as was the stern of the fishing boat which can be seen on the left in the painting.  With slanting light from the low sun, and my vantage point, it was possible to sense the color temperature differences between shady areas and areas lit directly and indirectly by late evening sun. In the painting, the contrasts were enhanced by pushing temperature differences.  The lit areas were painted in warm colors, and shade areas in cool, enhancing the sense of late evening light.7_11_12_thephyllisaindrydock_gloucesterma

To learn more about Tony and his paintings, visit his website here.

If you see one of our visiting artists painting in a public location, say hello and welcome them to Cape Ann. The artists will be here through Sunday. Listen to Sunday’s podcast to learn more about Cape Ann Plein Air event and visit their facebook page here for the most up to date information as well as information about all the fantastic events associated with the festival. Today, Tony Connor and Carol Arnold were both painting in our neighborhood!


carol-arnold-cape-ann-plein-air-copyright-kim-smithIf you see one of our visiting artists painting in a public location, say hello and welcome them to Cape Ann. The artists will be here through Sunday. Listen to Sunday’s podcast to learn more about Cape Ann Plein Air event and visit their facebook page here for the most up to date information as well as information about all the fantastic events associated with the festival. Today, Carol Arnold and Tony Connor were both painting in our neighborhood!

About Carol

Carol was first inspired to become a painter when as a child she became fascinated by the plein air painters her family encountered on vacations in seaside Gloucester, Massachusetts. After graduating from Vesper George School of art in Boston, Arnold spent several years working in the commercial art field before turning her attention fully to fine art painting. She is currently a member of Richard Schmid and Nancy Guzik’s Putney Painters located in Putney, Vermont. Arnold’s work, executed primarily from life, has been steadily winning recognition, including taking the First Honor award at the Inspiring Figures Exhibition at the Butler Institute of American Art in October of 2010. She won an Honorable Mention at the Portrait Society of America’s Members only competition in December of 2010, in April of 2011 she was awarded a Certificate of Excellence at the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition and another Certificate of Excellence award in May of 2012. To see more of Carol’s work, visit her website at

Recent achievements:

2016   First prize at the Laumeister Fine Art competition at the Bennington Center for the Arts.

2013    Southwest Art Magazine Award of Excellence at the American Women Artists National Juried Competition



tall-ship-lynx-portsmouth-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithPerhaps you’ve noticed the towering masts and proportionately large flag of the ship currently docked at Rocky Neck Marine Railways. They caught my attention this morning when at the Fish Pier taking photos as the masts are almost as tall as those of the Schooner Columbia. The flag and masts belong to the tall ship Lynx, a privateer inspired by the original tall ship that battled the British during the War of 1812. That war ship was named the Privateer Lynx.tall-ship-lynx-2-portsmouth-gloucester-copyright-ki

The Lynx is a square topsail schooner. Her port of registry is Portsmouth, New Hampshire and her homeports are Nantucket during warmer months and Saint Petersburg, Florida during wintertime. She is on her way to Portland and is scheduled to depart Gloucester on Monday. The Lynx is an educational organization devoted to hands-on programs that teach the history of America’s struggle to preserve its independence during the War of 1812. You can read more about the ship on the Lynx website here.

hunter-tall-ship-lynx-copyright-kim-smithHunter, the Lynx’s cook (left) and Jonathan, from the Liberty Star. The Liberty Star is undergoing some repairs at the Railways, on her way to the Virgin Islands for the winter.schooner-liberty-star-copyright-kim-smith

tall-ship-lynx-flag-portsmouth-gloucester-copyright-kiThe fifteen stars and stripes flag flew over Fort McHenry during the War of 1812 and is the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the “Star Spangled Banner.”

This was the only U.S. flag to have fifteen stripes. Two stripes and two stars were added for Vermont and Kentucky when they became states. Congress had a change of heart and in 1818, proclaimed that one star for each new state would be added on the 4th of July following the state’s admission to the union and there would be thirteen stripes representing the thirteen original colonies.

lynx12012_lynxPhotos of the Lynx under sail courtesy Google image search

tall-ship-lynx-rocky-neck-marine-railways-gloucester-harbor-copyright-kim-smithThe Harbor this morning at daybreak, with the Lynx on the far left, docked at the Marine Railwaystall-ship-lynx-rocky-neck-marine-railways-gloucester-harbor-2-copyright-kim-smithLiberty Star at the Railways

From wiki – A privateer was a private person or ship that engaged in maritime warfare under a commission of war. The commission, also known as a letter of marque, empowered the person to carry on all forms of hostility permissible at sea by the usages of war, including attacking foreign vessels during wartime and taking them as prizes. Captured ships were subject to condemnation and sale under prize law, with the proceeds divided between the privateer sponsors, shipowners, captains and crew. A percentage share usually went to the issuer of the commission. Since robbery under arms was common to seaborne trade, all merchant ships were already armed. During war, naval resources were auxiliary to operations on land so privateering was a way of subsidizing state power by mobilizing armed ships and sailors.


great-blue-heron-sunset-2-copyright-kim-smithWell before I could get close enough to take a crisp photo of the Great Blue heron feeding at the water’s edge, he flew up and away towards the opposite side of the river. I didn’t mind too much as it was so beautiful to see this magnificent bird soaring into the sunset.great-blue-heron-sunset-copyright-kim-smith


Professor Harp Tonight! Dave Sag’s Blues Party @ The Rhumb Line 8:30pm 10.6.2016

dave sag bw rl

We all need a little edumacation and respeck, so c’mon down to the Rummie this Thursday for another Blooz Semenar by that quixotic quack master of indigo, Professor Harp.* He’s got this harmonica that’s plugged into either an electric razor or a blender before it gets directly drilled into your skull. Goes ZZZZZ, beep,wheee, uncle!But seriously,folks. Prof H is the real deal and since he’s driving all the way from New Bedford to sing in Portuguese for you, the least you could do is bring some kale and mebbe some chorizo.

professor harp

Also, special guests Mari Martin and a dear friend from the west coast, George Friedenthal!
Mike DiBari, sizzling blowtorch of pain, will be on the guitar. Steevee Chaggaris, with that beautiful head of skin, will be on tubs.
This is the first of many weekends that I don’t have other gigs. Uh-


40 Railroad Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930
(978) 283-9732


Ann-Margaret Ferrante Hires New Legislative Aide

Ann-Margaret Ferrante Hires New Legislative Aide

Representative Ann-Margaret Ferrante (D-Gloucester) is pleased to announce she has hired a new legislative aide, Andrew “Dru” Tarr, to act as a district liaison. Tarr, no relation to State Senator Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester), will split his time between work at the State House in Boston, MA and Essex, Gloucester, and Rockport.

“It’s exciting to be working for such a strong advocate for our community and the issues that matter to us,” said Tarr, a lifelong Gloucester resident. “I’m looking forward to being able to help serve the people in the district, including those in my hometown of Gloucester.” Tarr previously worked as campaign manager for Ed O’Reilly in his bid to become the Democratic nominee for Essex County Sheriff.

“I am excited to have Dru on board. His ability to serve as another local point of contact for my office will help ensure our community’s needs are addressed,” said Ferrante. “I’m pleased to have a fellow Cape Ann native as a liaison who understands the needs of our community and her constituents.”

One of Tarr’s roles will be to hold local “office hours” in each of the communities of the district, during which residents can bring issues and concerns to Ferrante’s office in person. Times and places of office hours will be announced in the near future.


painted-turtles-niles-pond-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithI laughed out loud when looking through photos from several days ago, not realizing that at the time when taking snapshots of these beautiful Painted Turtles at Niles Pond they were not only basking, but also rubbernecking, and mostly all in the same direction. The turtles were on a rock adjacent to the Snapping Turtle (below), which at first glance looked like two rocks, a smaller stone (its head) and a large stone (body).

snapping-turtle-niles-pond-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithThe Snapping Turtle was about a foot long, unlike the Snapping Turtle furtively gliding through the murky water several weeks ago at Henry’s Pond. The stealthy one in the last photo was huge and appeared to be just shy of two feet!!snapping-turtle-henrys-pond-copyright-kim-smith

Turtles are ectotherms, relying on sunlight to warm and regulate their body temperature.

THE MENTALIST & REGGAE FEST – Time to think about what you’re doing Thanksgiving Weekend

While we don’t ordinarily plan ahead that much, Thanksgiving weekend is one notable exception.  That’s because if you don’t plan ahead, you’re often left with just a couple of lousy choices.  Here are two very different (ALL AGES) entertainment options that will likely both sell out by Thanksgiving:

Ever wonder who’s the REAL MENTALIST?

The character of “The Mentalist” (portrayed by Simon Baker in the hit CBS TV series) was inspired by Jon Stetson, who was a consultant on the show.  He’s entertained five U.S. Presidents, The King of Sweden, The Royal Family of Monaco, and appeared on several major Television Networks (CBS, NBC, PBS, A&E and more).  On Black Friday (Nov 25), You can see him LIVE right down the road at The Larcom in Beverly.  It’s the perfect way to laugh off the pounds you put on the day before — and be amazed by his sleight-of-mind!  Check him out in this video:

Then on Saturday Nov 26 you can be part of the first North Shore Reggae Fest featuring Warrior King & the Rootz Warriors, who are making their first East Coast U.S. appearance in NINE YEARS with local favorite Mamadou Diop and his band with Rockport’s Jake Pardee on guitar!  Gloucester’s DJ’s Lion Pride Sound opens the show with top spins from roots, rockers, lovers rock ska, and dancehall.  Check out Warrior King in this video:

Fozzie Hill and Wolf Ginandes Join Fly Amero This WednesdayEvening 7-10pm @ The Rhumb Line 10.5.2016

Dinner Specials Each Week!
Wednesday, October 5th – 7pm
Special Guests: FOZZIE & WOLF!

fozzie wolf

Alberta “Fozzie” Hill is among my all-time favorite female
artists here on the island. Wolf Ginandes and I have been
sharing one stage or another for well over 30 years and
running. Small wonder. The man is a genius. These two
unique, gentle spirits share a chemistry rarely found in the
world we all know today… and it all starts at 7! ~ Fly
Dinner with great music!
*Each week features a special, invited musical guest
The Rhumb Line Kitchen……now features Janet Brown with some new and healthy ideas!
Plus a fine, affordable wine menu!
10/12 – Toni Ann

10/19 – Orville Giddings (guest host)

Looking forward……to seeing you there🙂

NEW FILM: Scenes and Vignettes from the 32nd Annual Gloucester Schooner Festival

2016 Gloucester Schooner Festival – Dedicated to Kay Ellis

Highlights from Gloucester’s magnificent Schooner Festival, including the schooner welcome, Parade of Sail, the schooner race from a rocky cliff outpost, awards ceremony where Fly Amero and Daisy Nell honor Kay with a song, Daisy tells a funny joke, Adventure Captain Stefan Edick wins a special award, fireworks from Stage Fort Park, and more. The film opens with scenes of Cape Ann schooners, participating schooners, and Gloucester fishing boats, shot all around Gloucester Harbor during the weekend of the festival.

With special thanks to Al Bezanson, Daisy Nell, and Schooner Welcome Committee members Brett Ramsey, Max Ramsey, and Nick Ramsey.

The Gloucester Schooner Festival is held each year over Labor Day weekend and organized by Maritime Gloucester and the Gloucester Schooner Festival Committee. The Schooner Festival celebrates the role the fishing schooner has played in the maritime heritage of the east coast, especially Cape Ann.

Race Results

2016 Particpating Schooners and Captains

Adventure – Stefan Edick

Ardelle – Harold Burnham

American Eagle – John Foss

Apella – Dan Hall

Bald Eagle – Paul Cole/Judith Nast

Blackbird – Peter Thompson

Columbia – Karl Joyner

Eileen Marie – Peter Houston

Fame – Mike Rutstein (not raccing)

Green Dragon – Andy Bezanson

Hindu – Josh Rowan

Ishmael – Fred and Sarah Murphy

Istar – Josiah Mayo

Lettie Howard – Colin Graham

Liberty Clipper – Dylan Saltzman

Light Reign – Mike Lawrence

Malabar II – James Lobdell

Narwhal – Bob Bernert

Principles – Derek Durling

Redbird – Daisy Nell/Stan Collinson

Roseway – Tom Ryan

Sugar Babe – Ed Boynton

Thomas Lannon – Heath Ellis

Tree of Life – Paul Morse

Tyrone – Matt Sutphin

Our Hearts and Prayers are with Judy, the Goetemann Family, and Rocky Neck Friends


1138821847-1Gordon Goetmann Obituary

Gordon Goetemann, 83, Educator, Painter, Rocky Neck Art Colony Community Activist, passed away peacefully at home on September 29.
To all who wander throughout the Rocky Neck Art Colony, the courtyard with yellow-cushioned wooden benches in front of Gordon and Judith Goetemann’s art gallery is a warm, welcoming place–a colorful thread in the tight-knit neighborhood, an inviting space for locals, tourists and art patrons from near and far to share low-key banter or debate the meaning of life.
Born and raised in St. Louis, MO., Gordon earned his BFA at Notre Dame and his MFA at the University of Iowa. During the summer of 1953, following his junior year at Notre Dame, he found his way to Gloucester where he studied under Umberto Romano, a formative experience which influenced his future works. It was also where he fell in love, with the dramatic light, the shoreline, the culture of Cape Ann, and with Judy Steele, a fellow Romano student who later became his wife and partner of 58 years. Together they raised 4 children.
In1977, Gordon and Judy opened the doors to their gallery at 37 Rocky Neck Ave, put the yellow cushioned chairs out, and joined one of America’s oldest working artist colonies.
Aware that the colony’s strength ebbed and flowed, Gordon became active in its steerage committee and dedicated himself to making the community strong and able to resist East Gloucester’s gentrification pressures.
He helped inspire key players to get involved in the creation of SeArts (Society of the Encouragement of the Arts on Cape Ann), the Rocky Neck Cultural Center and the Artist Residency Program at RNAC, renamed in 2010 in his honor. Thanks to their joint efforts, the Colony’s strength is flowing again.
Summers on Rocky Neck were the treat that followed 9 months of hard work teaching, painting until 3 a.m. and shoveling chest-deep snow drifts in St. Joseph, MN, where Gordon taught art history and studio courses at the College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University.
He was most fulfilled by his 40 year teaching career, working within a culture steeped in Benedictine values alongside many dear friends and colleagues. Former students would often recall that they had signed up for an easy course titled “painting”, then got bowled over by “the toughest class they ever loved”.
Gordon taught by example, challenging his students to live an “examined life”, to question and define their values, often within the context of their religious precepts, then create their artwork based upon what they had learned.Gordon’s studio contained as many papers filled with longhand notes on his philosophical queries as it did tubes of oil paint. He thought long and hard before he’d pick up the paint brush. Transfiguration of form and spiritual resurrection were common themes of study, examples being his Celestial Islands series and his magna opus on Gustav Mahler’s Symphonie II (Resurrection).
Though raised in a devout Catholic home, he was, at heart, a humanist, a moralist and a seeker of truth. Knowledge was a tool used to facilitate the examination process. And knowledge was a commodity Gordon rarely lacked — except when it came to the fate of his hallowed Notre Dame football team’s end-of-season scorecard, or the answer to the twelve letter word on 23 across, third and seventh letters being Q… (He loved his puzzles!)

Students who traveled with him to the Louvre, the Uffizi or the Prado would often try to stump him on the names of the most obscure paintings, to no avail. He’d name it, then study the work silently for a long minute and expound on the work’s uniqueness, origins and influence on movements to follow. He possessed encyclopedic knowledge and total recall, a pristine mind, even while his body was failing him.

Of his art, he told Art New England in an interview two years ago: “I always see myself as a synthesizer of the past, working to keep it vital in terms of contemporary culture,” he explained. “My expertise is in the history of the visual form. “There is no experience anywhere else that is like it. Love would be the closest comparison…it gives me a reason for living.”
Judy Goetemann and the neighbors invite all readers to come visit the galleries on Rocky Neck, have dinner, take in an event at the Cultural Center. While there, please come have a seat on the yellow cushioned benches and celebrate the spirit of the neighborhood, the Colony, and Gordon.
In addition to his wife, Judith Steele Goetemann, he is survived by his four children, Elizabeth Scholes and husband Garrett of Kittery Point, ME., David Goetemann of Gloucester, Mark Goetemann of Lincoln, Chris Goetemann of Gloucester; grandchildren Ava and William Scholes, Owen Goetemann, Theo and Adelle Goetemann; and his brother Gerald Goetemann of Parkersburg, W.V.
Visiting hours will be held Friday, October 7, from 4 to 7 pm at the Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street, Gloucester.
A private family service will follow at the Greely Funeral Home on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m.
A celebration of Gordon’s life gathering will take place at the Rocky Neck Cultural Center at a future date.
Contributions may be made in his memory to the Rocky Neck Cultural Center to support the Goetemann Artist Residency Program.
For online condolences, please visit

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