Category Archives: Gloucester History

The Captain Nelson Amero Wheel project

Information provided by Jeff Amero:

The wheel is being shipped from Florida (cousin Chuck Amero) and will be rebuild by Captain Thomas Ellis over the winter and its new home will be at 20 Fort Square on the Captain Nelson Deck

Nelson Amero (2)   FV Doris F Amero

Captain Nelson Amero and the F/V Doris F. Amero

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Captain Nelson Amero  Roof Top Deck at 20 Fort Square

 

Found Old Rocky Neck Photos From Wm Kensington’s GREAT GREAT GREAT Grandfather Augustus Story Wonson

Hey Joey, I found these today, my Great Great Great Grandfather is Augusts Story Wonson, you know 24 Wonson Street Rocky neck first home built and the famous “Paint Factory”  Enjoy and feel free to share… Best Regards. Wm Keniston

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Now housing Sailor Stans!

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Boiled coffee From Al Bezanson

Boiled coffee has been the preferred morning beverage on GREEN DRAGON for most of the 53 years I’ve owned her.  On fishing vessels it was/is the way to go as well.  About fifty years ago I was aboard the dragger DELAWARE when provisions, including a boxed, new giant percolator, arrived from Gloucester Grocery.  Bert Cluett was the cook.  The first thing he did was unbox the percolator and fling the innards over the side at the state fish pier.  The general feeling was that sooner or later some of the parts would go missing, not to mention the extra work of cleaning them, so you might as well get rid of them forthwith.

It just came to my attention that my neighbor of long ago, Joseph Burnett,  patented a product for discerning coffee drinkers.  Only ½ cent per day per family. 

The patent  likely expired long ago, so here is an opportunity for someone to challenge the K-cup market and add value to cod landings.

Al Bezanson

coffee settler

Eugene Simas and Dorothy Schobert – A love Story from the Hill

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Portuguese Hill of course. A Story that has it ALL – War, Love, Italy, Portuguese and a Wedding Dress made from a parachute.

The link to this story (Written By Gary R. Mormino, Special to the Tampa Bay Times) is about two people connected by a war, from two different places, one from the mid-west the other, from right here in Gloucester.

Click here to Link to the Story or copy the following url:

 http://www.tampabay.com/news/perspective/the-birth-of-a-boom/2230741

(This story is also a tribute to Eugene’s mother Gertrude, who was a very special lady helping my family when we first arrived here in the US in March of 1954)

Co-Authors of Fitz Henry Lane – Family and Friends

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Sarah Dunlap and Stephanie Buck co-authors of a book about Fitz Henry Lane.   The book can be purchased at the Gloucester Archive department, where Sarah volunteers, and also at the Cape Ann Museum where Stephanie works.

Also available at Amazon (Fitz Lane) 

 

Many thanks to both Sarah and Stephanie for all their help in my own research project.

 

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Lennie Merullo finds David Cox

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Lennie recently passed away at the age of 98 (May 5, 1917 – May 30, 2015), during his 50 years of scouting for the MLB, he found David Cox, see Newspaper clipping from Gloucester Times, stating that while scouting in the New England area. He had come to watch Gloucester’s Frankie Destino and Lynn English’s Johnny Hyde, but found in the midst David Cox.

“This Cox boy is a smooth operator, and looks like he can hit” said Lennie. “He’s a senior, you say? Looks like a good collge prospect to me. Has the arm, the speed and the power. One of the best boys I’ve seen this season”.

 

Cox

David continues to show his passion for sports through his photography of local Gloucester High School Sports, and published here on GoodMorningGloucester. David’s GMG Posts

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FISHERMAN’S STATUE WAS NEVER CONTROVERSIAL!

For the latest on the proposed David Black sculpture controversy, read Bing McGilvray’s letter in today’s Gloucester Daily Times. The letter is not yet posted online as of 10am this morning, but you can read it on the opinion page in the paper or here:

“Today’s Editorial, City’s arts policy must define room for public input, leads off with the insinuation that every new work of public art is always met with some degree of negativity, followed by this statement: “Indeed, reports indicate that some local folks didn’t immediately warm even to sculptor Leonard Craske’s 1923 Man at the Wheel…” What reports are you citing here? Whatever the source, this is absolutely untrue.” READ COMPLETE TEXT HERE: Fisherman’s Statue Was Never Controversial!

Please attend the forum to begin the process of developing a city wide arts policy, which will be held on May 14th. The exact time to be announced shortly. This is an important discussion and I look forward to seeing you there!

They that go down to the sea in ships.

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Comsos 12 ©Kim Smith 2014 copy

BIKINI-SPEEDO DODGEBALL 2013 – THE MOVIE #gloucesterma

For all of you folks that have never witnessed THE MOVIE for 2013, please take the time to do so. You will be entertained.

(for ease of playback on a video of this length, click the play button, then pause it for a few seconds, it speeds up the loading process)

And please come out and support this years event, it’a for the NEXT STEP, they change lives…you could, too!

Book Recommendation “IRON MEN WOODEN SHIPS”

Book Recommendation 

This is an Awesome Book with great photos. Highly Recommended!

Tell him GMG sent you!

To purchase on Ebay:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CAPE-ANN-BOOKS-GLOUCESTER-MASS-FISHING-CAPTAINS-/141594890919

“IRON MEN

WOODEN SHIPS”

From the Author;

“IRON MEN WOODEN SHIPS SKIPPERS OF GLOUCESTER MASS. THE BOOK HAS 89 PAGES, EACH PAGE FEATURES A SKIPPER AND HIS BOAT WITH INFORMATION OF THE SKIPPER AND THE BOAT.THE PICTURE OF THE SKIPPER MEASURES 6″W BY 3″3/4″H.THE BOAT IS FEATURED UNDER THE SKIPPERS AND IS ALSO 6″W AND 3″3/4″H. THE COVER PHOTO IS THE FISHERMEN STATUE TAKEN DURING THE STORM OF 1978.THESE PICTURES WERE TAKEN IN THE EARLY TO MID 70’s.ALMOST EVERY BOAT HAS SUNK AND ONE LOST AT SEA WITH ALL HANDS.IT IS TRULY A ONE OF A KIND AND UNIQUE BOOK.MOST OF THE SKIPPERS HAVE PASSED AWAY SOME RETIRED TO THERE HOME COUNTRY AND SOME ARE STILL IN GLOUCESTER.THIS BOOK WILL BE A HANDSOME ADDITION TO ANY BOOK SHELF. THIS BOOK IS ALSO SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.”

Army of Nurses

Don’t Plow Me In!

a9645_007wmMain Street, Rockport, circa 1898. Poole’s Drug Store is on the left, and Rockport’s first school house, circa 1790, is on the right. The team of horses in the background is most likely a wooden wedge-plow or a weighted wooden platform to compress the snow.

Blizzard of ’69, Gloucester

a8945_402wm copyForty six years ago, almost to the day, the Blizzard of 1969 visited us. It dropped a mere 20 inches of snow. This is Gloucester’s DPW yard on Poplar Street, with National Guard and police vehicles in the yard and on the street. I think I see an armored personnel carrier on the right. The so-called “Lindsay Blizzard” killed 94 people. Mother Nature has a way of repeating herself, as does history.

Glorious Luminous Painting of Our Lady of Good Voyage by Black Artist Allan Randall Freelon

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Bing McGilvray shares from the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery website:

“The son of middle-class Philadelphia parents who valued education and the arts, Allan Randall Freelon, Sr. (1895-1960) became the first African American artist to receive a four-year scholarship in 1912 to attend the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a master of fine arts degree from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University. Freelon served as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army during World War I before joining the faculty of the Philadelphia Board of Education in 1919 as an instructor. He was appointed Art Supervisor for elementary and then secondary education, a position he held until his retirement. While working in the Philadelphia education system, Freelon continued to pursue a career as an artist in his own right. In 1921, he had his first solo exhibition, at the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library and that same year, he became the first African American member of the Philadelphia Print Club.

During a two-year course of study at the Barnes Foundation (1927-1929), he became well versed in the paintings of Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, and French Impressionism. He studied with Emile Gruppe and Hughe Breckenridge and worked with two of the best Philadelphia printmakers Dox Thrash and Earl Horter. His work caught the attention of the Harmon Foundation and was included in the famous 1929 traveling exhibition of works by black artists.

In the late 1920s, he began to summer in Gloucester, Massachusetts, a seaside New England artistic community where he completed luminous landscapes that echoed his impressionistic tendencies.

In 1935, Freelon participated in the NAACP organized exhibition, Art Commentary on Lynching. His piece, Barbecue – American Style, depicted a crowd watching a black man being burned to death. Such a graphic depiction of violence was a departure for Freelon who was labeled a “traditionalist” by Alain Locke.

Throughout his life, Freelon enjoyed a stable career as a regional painter but in recent years, with the support of a traveling exhibition organized by North Carolina Central University Art Museum, his work has attracted a more national audience.”

Coast Guard in #GloucesterMA in 1925 @USCGNortheast

Good morning, Joey,

Attached photo is one I’ve been searching for for three years and finally found it yesterday.

It was taken in 1923 at Coast Guard Base #7 in Gloucester.  It shows 9 of the then new 75’ Coast Guard Patrol Boats (and a couple smaller older boats.

Those boats were assigned along the coast to chase and interdict the rum-rummers during Prohibition.  Over 200 were built and assigned to CG stations on both coasts and later as Coast Guard and Navy patrol craft during WW-II.  Photo credit, Library of Commerce.

I’m currently working on a painting which shows Bill (the real ) McCoy’s rum-runners Arethusa, a/k/a Tomoka jogging on Rum-Row off the New York-New Jersey coast under the watchful eye of one of these, CG-153.  Hope you can use it.

Bill Hubbard

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Gloucester Selfie, circa 1940

a8567_021wm NanaScalesAlice Curtis made this selfie in her bedroom mirror about 75 years ago. It probably wasn’t Gloucester’s first selfie, but I’ve never seen an older one. Today’s selfie is defined as taken with the photographer’s arm, and no mirror, tripod, or self timer used. Some say a cell phone camera must be used. I say hogwash, and enjoy the photographer who made 7,000 of my historic negatives. Alice was a pioneer in many ways.

Thirty five and some years later, about 1975, I photographed my maternal grandmother, Jennie Lee (Mitchell) Scales reflected in her bedroom dresser mirror. I think the comparison of the two photos is amazing.

Vincent Ferrini Mural Unveiling Event

MuralUnveiling5121wmChalk up another successful  Community event in my gallery. In addition to mural artist Tricia O’Neill, mural subject Vincent Ferrini’s nephew Henry Ferrini was there and spoke to the audience of about forty. After the speeches, the group walked down to see Tricia’s mural. I’d say this was a “win-win” for all.

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