Category Archives: Art

Joe G writes GMG: Does anyone have more information on this Rosario Piraino painting? WWII Veteran, Artist, GHS Class of 1945

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Joe G writes:

“Hello Joey:  I’ve been trying for many years to find out some information about a painting by Rosario Piraino that I have. In image of that painting is embedded below. 

I did mail a letter to an address in Gloucester back in about 2003, to whom I thought was a relative (I think the name was Carmella Rosario), but my letter was returned and marked “Not at this address.”  I’d sent some emails to a woman who’d shown on her Facebook page that she was indeed related to Mr. Piraino, but I never got any response. 

In any case, I’m trying to find out if there is a gallery or other place where some of his paintings may be on view. His work is quite good. 

If you might have any information about the subject I would be very appreciative if you would be so kind as to share any of it with me.  

Thank you.”

Rediscovering art and artists can be slow detective work. I don’t know the approximate year of the painting. The rocks could be identified. GMG readers may know more: is there a fellow artist that showed together in a group show with Rosie, traded art, stories? Did he hang his paintings in his house? Did he have a studio? Do you own a similar work? I did not find his name in some local artist member directories. The obituary describes seascapes and schooner as motifs. Let’s see!

For GMG readers like me who did not know him (I know many did), here is some information about Rosario Piraino that may jog some memories. Joe G thanks for the note and intriguing request.

Rosario A “Rosie” Piraino (1927- 1989)

Rosario was born in Gloucester on November 23, 1927. He was a life long Gloucester resident and graduate of the Class of 1945. He was a member of the ROTC. His interest in the GHS yearbook, Flicker? Drawing. He was a WWII army Veteran and member of the Capt. Lester S. Wass Post #3, American Legion and the Gloucester Lodge of Elks No. 892.  He was a professionally trained artist with a fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Boston. In 1971 his family resided at 14 Orchard Street. For nearly 3 decades, he worked as an artist and Art Director at MIT before retiring in 1991*. There is a comment about carpooling with him to Lincoln Labs.

*From the printed matter for his obituary:

“Rosario was dedicated to his family and his beloved city. He was happiest strolling the boulevard meeting and greeting his friends. He spent his younger years working as a fish cutter along the waterfront. Along with his friend, the late Charlie Favalora, he owned and operated the Pioneer Fish Company.

He was an accomplished fine artist, having painted many seascape images of the Cape Ann waterfront. One of his favorite subjects was the schooner “Gertrude L. Thebaud”. Rosario was an avid golfer, who was affectionately known as the “King of Candlewood”, a nod to the three “holes-in-one” he made in his retirement. He will be missed by the many friends who enjoyed his sense of humor, stories and positive attitude.

In addition to his wife of six years, he is survived by three daughters and sons-in-law, Stephanie and Steve DelTorchio, Kathryn and Douglas Goodick and Paula and John Reilly all of Gloucester, three sons and two daughters-in-law, Stephen and Gayle (Frary) Piraino of Rockport, Dominic Piraino of Phoenix, AZ and James and Donna (Durland) Piraino of Gloucester, six grandchildren, Jeffrey Piraino of Rockport, Stephen and his wife, Kimberly DelTorchio of Satellite Beach, FL, Lindsay and Amy DelTorchio and Lauren and Adam Goodick all of Gloucester, three brothers, Frank Piraino of Gloucester, James and his wife, Marie Piraino of Waltham and Walter and his wife, Susan Piraino of Peachtree City, GA, a sister, Phyllis and her husband, Ernest Morin of Gloucester, a brother-in-law, Paul Ventimiglia of Gloucester, two sisters-in-law, Eileen Trupiano and Francesca Piraino both of Gloucester, Josephine’s grandson, Jonathan Moore of Essex and many nieces and nephews. He was also predeceased by his first wife, Grace M. (Ventimiglia) Piraino, a brother, Anthony Piraino and a brother-in-law, Salvatore Ventimiglia.”

Their daughter, writer Stephanie DelTorchio, responds.

Their daughter, Kathryn Goodick, ran for Ward 4 City Council in 2015. That link is from GMG which ran any candidate press release that was sent in.

Piraino’s 2008 quote in the Boston Globe Saints and Sinners Collide (Fiesta and Brewery):

“In the onetime fishing capital of the world, the St. Peter’s Fiesta – a five-day festival where faith, family, and celebration are emphasized – brings thousands of people into Gloucester’s downtown. But over the last decade, as the fishing industry has nearly collapsed and the fiesta has taken on commercial sponsors – such as liquor companies – some wonder if more people see the event as a reason to party than to pray. “They took God out of it,” says Rosario Piraino, a retired fisherman and fish plant owner.”

Cape Ann Reads picture book contest: local artist John Bassett steps up to volunteer

Reminder in the today’s Gloucester Daily Times that the Cape Ann Reads deadline to register for the original children’s picture book contest is two weeks around the corner– November 15th. The deadline for the book submissions by registered applicants is December 15.

Thank you to Rockport glass sculptor, John Bassett, www.basglas.com

for responding to the GMG post last week calling for   Volunteer artists and illustrators to assist local writers with their book submissions! There are three or four writers hoping to find a match. John made the generous offer of use of his images for a book applicant, plus the possibility of creating new work in response to their book. If you or an artist you know would like to volunteer please email capeannreads2016@gmail.com.

It’s easy to register for the Cape Ann creates for Cape Ann Reads children’s picture book contest

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Two weeks until Cape Ann Reads registration deadline (see the Desi Smith photo of Cape Ann Savings Bank ‘free shred day’)

 

Calling all high school art students: don’t miss amazing opportunity for Portfolio critique by major art schools at the HIVE tomorrow!

What a fabulous idea and experience directed by Zach O’Brien– a graphic artist, Rockport High School art teacher, and Hive gallery curator!

Cape Ann Regional Portfolio Night is Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at the Hive Pleasant Street, Gloucester from 6:30pm -8:30pm.

Great Gloucester Daily Times article by Joann Mackenzie amazing list of colleges participating and sending representatives.

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Haunting for Halloween: Pumpkin carving and poetry John Greenleaf Whittier & Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

Jack o’lantern traditions. There’s this – our annual amateur foray

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and then this public art tableau  that we stop for each year, just past 370 Main Street, Gloucester (before the Crow’s Nest heading into downtown Gloucester)

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The history of carving jack o’lanterns includes a description in a Victorian era poem by John Greenleaf Whittier (b.1807 Haverhill, MA-d.1892 Danvers, MA; resided/buried in Amesbury)-  a Massachusetts poet, legislator, journalist, editor, Quaker, and abolitionist. Cape Ann, North Shore, Essex County, and New England appear in his prose. 

Excerpt from The Pumpkin, ca.1846 Thanksgiving poem

Oh, fruit loved of boyhood! the old days recalling,

When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling!

When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin,

Glaring out through the dark with a candle within!

When we laughed round the corn-heap, with hearts all in tune,

Our chair a broad pumpkin,—our lantern the moon,

Telling tales of the fairy who travelled like steam,

In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her team!

 

Whittier was a contributing founder of Atlantic Monthly.  He was wildly popular, successful, and influential in his time. He helped many other writers. Letters to Whittier “poured in at the rate of ten, twenty, and sometimes thirty a day, making all manner of unreasonable requests and sending innumerable axes to grind…” In 1887 “deluged by over a thousand letters and manuscripts at his birthday, he put a public notice…that he could not answer any letters or read any manuscripts…”* Schools, cities and towns across the country were named after him. “People seem determined to use my name lately in many ways. Within a week I have had two ‘literary Institutes’** named for me, and a big vessel launched last week from Newburyport yard carries “Whittier” in brass letters to her element. I hope I shall not next hear of my name attached to notes of hand!”
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps was “one of the many woman writers Whittier befriended, but their relationship was especially close. Whittier wrote her scores of letters during his life and they met often to discuss religious themes. Whittier once wrote of her: Miss Stuart Phelps was there-an intense nature-frail but strong-a Puritan with passion and fire of Sappho and the moral courage of Joan of Arc.”** Phelps spent her summers at the seaside in East Gloucester, and was equally compassionate about social concerns.
Whittier and Phelps joined other luminaries at gatherings held in the Cambridge home of James (editor/publisher) and Annie Fields (writer) and other salons.  Who might be mixing it up there? Charles Dickens, Mary Abigail Dodge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Dead Howells, Sarah Orne Jewett, Lucy Larcom,  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Phelps, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Celia Thaxter and Whittier. Jewett, Longfellow and others visited and wrote about Gloucester. Here’s a link from the Cornell University library to Phelps’ Atlantic Monthly article The 10th of January  about the tragic 1860 Pemberton Mills collapse and fire in Lawrence, MA*** (estimated 90-200+ killed), less known than the horrific 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire (146 killed).
*Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier 1861-1892, Volumes I II III, 1975, Harvard, edited by John B. Pickard. Fun read!  We’re told one of the colleges was Whittier college, Salem, Iowa
**ditto above and below any mentions from letters in the timeline

Selected Whittier links and timeline bits:

1908 poem: The Gloucester Mother, by Sarah Orne Jewett, copy of McClure’s Magazine where it first was published: http://www.unz.org/Pub/McClures-1908oct-00702
1888: Whittier “Was there ever such a droll thing?”** letter to Annie Adams Fields gossiping and happy for Elizabeth Stuart Phelps in love with a younger man “Love seems to have cured her…I feel rather aggrieved that I wasn’t consulted.” He calls her E.S.P.  To Celia Thaxter who Whittier visited on the Isle of Shoals, “treasuring evenings in her parlor room where she told ghost stories or they exchanged folk tales:   “What do you think of Eliza Stuart’s marriage to young Ward? He is a good fellow and Elizabeth for once in her life is happy!” Phelps married Herbert Dickinson Ward in 1888–he was 27 and she was 44. It didn’t go well: she bucked his surname within three years and wrote Confessions of a Wife in 1902.
1888 Whittier letter to Annie Fields after editing a new edition of his poetry: “I hope I am correcting a little of the bad grammar, and rhythmical blunders, which have so long annoyed my friends who have graduated from Harvard instead of a country district school.”
1886 Whittier poem: To a Cape Ann Schooner
1886 Whittier letter mentioning Elizabeth Stuart Phelps sending a “very pretty shade of fine lace work…because of its exquisite color” gift on Christmas Eve, which Whittier re-gifted🙂
1884 Whittier letter to Annie Fields: “Have you seen Elizabeth Phelps lately? I am not in favor of capital punishment, but the burglars who robbed her of her hard earnings would fare hard if I were on the jury that tried them…”
1882 Whittier letter “The world can no longer be to me what it was while Emerson and Longfellow lived. They should have outlived me, for Emerson was never sick, and Longfellow until the last two years had splendid health. A feeling of loneliness and isolation oppresses me. But as Emerson said to me the last time I saw him ‘the time is short’ “ collection of Swarthmore college
1879 Whittier letter to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps: “Dr. Bowditch says that a man of active brain ought to make a fool of himself occasionally and unbend at all hazards to his dignity.” admittedly hard for these two
1877  Mark Twain (work friend),  Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow at Whittier’s 70th birthday celebration. Hawthorne and Whittier were not exactly fans of each other’s works.
1873: Whittier thank you note to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps for sending her book
1868: Whittier letter to Annie Fields complimenting Elizabeth Stuart Phelps The Gates Ajar “Good in itself and full of promise.” 1869 he’s promoting it to Harriet Minot Pittman
1868 Whittier thank you note to James Thomas Field for paying him the $1500 check
1866 Whittier poem: Snow bound: A Winter Idyll  his bestseller and dedicated to his family- memories from childhood
1857 Whittier poem: Garrison of Cape Ann* opens with a view of Cape Ann as seen from Po Hill: “From the hills of home forth looking, far beneath the tent-like span,
Of the sky, I see the white gleam headland of Cape Ann.” For readers that have come this far–the complete Garrison of Cape Ann follows the break.
1843 Whittier poem: Massachusetts to Virginia (in reference to George Latimer, alleged fugitive slave) “The fishing smacks of Marblehead, the sea-boats of Cape Ann…”  Woodie Guthrie 1958 This Land is Your Land feels like a 20th Century connection.

Read more

Check Out the Progress On Jon Sarkin’s Rug Being Produced In Nepal

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Here is a large, custom-sized rug from Jon Sarkin‘s Fish City rug collection in the finishing process, being washed and sheared in Nepal. Remember, if you can dream it, we can weave it!- From The Landry and Arcari Facebook Page- https://www.facebook.com/landryandarcari/

3 more days for the Mayor’s Arts Challenge

Reminder about the Massachusetts Cultural Council 2016 Mayor’s Arts Challenge in the Gloucester Daily Times Talk of the Times by All Hands On Deck  (love that)

You can use your smartphone to watch it on the YouTube channel–you know you’re there when you can see the ‘thumb’s-up’ icon beneath the video window.

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Last day: Cape Ann Icons and New England WC Society 15th Biennial North American Open Show @NSAA

You have until 5pm to see these 2 group shows at North Shore Arts Association that are closing today. Downstairs is filled with vistas so dear to local artists they’ve selected these works over others for the Icons of Cape Ann exhibition. Stop by and enjoy their selections. Do your ideas about the theme, emotions and vistas gel with theirs? 114 pieces make their case and they include ones that will stop you in your tracks.Upstairs is devoted entirely to watercolor and is at times mesmerizing. The installation includes juror feedback on the display labels and a peek into process for artists considering juried competitions. The New England Watercolor Society website has listed this year’s winners along with each artist and the work that was accepted for the Biennial, established in 1988. You really have to go in person to linger and closely observe this art. A few to look out for: Evelyn Dunphy, William Perry, Stephen Holland, June Webster, Joey Grant, Rance Jones, Michael Maron, Richard Hanson, Robert J O’Brien, and Kristin Stashenko. Also local artists including: Suzanne Brailey, Paul George, Marion Hall, Marilyn Swift, Carole Loiacono,and Charles Shurcliff.

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Icons of Cape Ann 2016 exhibition at North Shore Arts Association: Jim Gibbons “Reflections” (top) and Ray Crane “Outward Bound, Gloucester”

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New England Watercolor Society 15th Biennial North American Open Show at North Shore Arts Association

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Richard Hanson

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Robert J O’Brien

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Harry Ruddock III

 

 

 

Fine artist Loren Doucette: Great teacher announces fall/winter classes

Loren Doucette Studio and Teaching, (978)-879-6588, 1 Center Street (between Passports and Pastaio Via Corta), Gloucester, MA, www.lorendoucetteart.com

All classes to be held on the 3rd Floor at 1 Center Street @TenPoundStudio space, silk painting studio

Loren Doucette’s DRAWING THURSDAYS, 9-11:30AM, beginning November 3rd

Loren Doucette’s EXPRESSIVE PAINTING THURSDAYS, WATERCOLOR & ACRYLIC,  2-4:30PM, beginning November 3rd

Loren Doucette’s SATURDAY WORKSHOP & PRIVATE OFFERINGS, monthly 2nd Saturdays, starting November 12, 9AM-noon

 

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Announcing Loren Doucette’s 2014 new space at 1 Center Stree

 

 

 

Juni Van Dyke solo exhibition at Jane Deering Gallery: Artist of such expressive power and spirit

Juni Van Dyke’s show at Jane Deering Gallery 19 Pleasant Street Gloucester MA opens Saturday October 29 5-7PM and continues through December 2017. I think Juni’s art transposes her passions and delights into works of sumptuous color and significance. They are beautiful, moving and resonant with her life experiences.

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Jane Deering Gallery is located within the 1842 home built for Capt. Harvey Coffin MacKay and  Sally (Somes) MacKay. They were married in 1816. The building is one of many distinctive assets within Gloucester’s Central Historic District. There aren’t many wood structures dating from this time because of fires.

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McKay’s name is on the 1821 First Fire Club list, established in 1766, appointed to Engine No. Two.  Members agreed to 14 Articles: “to be helpful to each other in case of fire; 2, each member to provide two good leather buckets and two strong bags of not less than three bushels capacity, the fine for non-compliance being 12-1/2 cents; 3, to meet annually, also quarterly, with a fine of 12-1/2 cents for non-attendance; 4, a committee of two to inspect each other’s premises and inspect all fire apparatus quarterly; 5, a moderator and clerk to be elected; 6, prescribe the duties of the clerk; 7, to expel members absent from four quarterly meetings and refusing to pay the fines and assessments; 8, to pay for buckets or bags lost at any fire; 9, each member to pay 50 cents for a printed copy of the articles; 10, a secret watch-word for the society, the fine for divulging the same being 40 cents; 11, a fine of 12-1/2 cents for buckets or bags being out of their proper places; 12, fines and assessments to be paid to the Clerk; 12, a three-fourths vote necessary for admission, etc.; 14, a quarterly assessment of 25 cents to meet ordinary expenses.” See The Gloucester Fire Department: its history and work from 1793 to 1893 by John J Somes, ©1892 

Capt. MacKay was born Joshua Gee Whittemore, Jr; records indicate that on February 13, 1813 he was “allowed to take the name of Harvey C. Mackay,…and be called and known by the said name; and the said name shall forever hereafter be considered as his only proper and legal name, to all intents and purposes.” At one time MacKay was Fitz Henry Lane’s landlord. Fitz Hugh Lane changed his name to Fitz Henry Lane in 1832. You can learn more about Lane at the Cape Ann Museum, right next door to the Jane Deering Gallery. The MacKay house jogged my memory about something else I learned from the Cape Ann Museum in a brief article by Stephanie Buck. In 1879, Sarah Johnson, a MacKay lodger, was the first woman to vote in Gloucester for a public official.  Buck’s article reveals who was second, third and fourth in line!  I thought about that when I peeked through the window at Juni’s show. Here’s a solo exhibition by a woman, at a gallery owned by a woman, next to a museum run by Ronda Faloon, with nearby exhibits featuring other solo shows by women, galleries and businesses owned by women, and Mayor Romeo Theken at City Hall. I hope we can raise money to commission original portraits of Mayor Kirk and Mayor Romeo Theken to add to City Hall.  They are the only Mayors that aren’t represented.

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In 2014, a trunk filled with archival material attributed to Captain MacKay including papers about the ship Parthian fetched $900 (est. $150-200) at online auction site, Invaluable, for The Gallery at Knotty Pine in West Swanzey, NH.

“I, Harvey C. Mackay do solemnly, sincerely, and truly swear, that the within REPORT and LIST, subscribed with my name and now delivered by me to the Collector of the district of BOSTON AND CHARLESTOWN, contains, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the names, age, sex and occupation of all the passengers, together with the name of the country to which they severally belong, and that of which they intend to become inhabitants, which were on board the London Packet whereof I am at present master, at the time of her sailing from the port of London or which have at any time since been taken on board the said vessel. And I do likewise swear, that all matters whatsoever in said report and list expressed, are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, just and true. SO HELP ME GOD. (Signed) Harvey Mackay, MASTER. Sworn to before me, this twenty-fifth day of April 1827, (signed) J. W., Dy. COLLECTOR.” See the (short) Passenger list on board the packet Ship London from England to Boston, Massachusetts on 25 April 1827 

 

A fishing schooner built in Essex in 1866 was named for ‘intrepid Capt Harvey C Mackay (1786-1869). From Out of Gloucester, http://www.downtosea.com: On December 24, 1879: The Sch. ‘Harvey C. Mackay’ Given Up as Lost: The Schooner Harvey C. Mackay, for whose safety fears have been entertained, and for whose coming back to port anxious ears have long been waiting, has been given up as lost by her owners, and she must be added, with her crew of hardy men, to the list of lost fishermen. She left port… 

New Jane Deering Gallery opens in Gloucester

 

Volunteer Artists and Illustrators Sought

There are a few local writers who would welcome help from local artists to complete their book submission into Cape Ann Creates for Cape Ann Reads Children’s Picture Book Contest! Please email capeannreads2016@gmail.com

For more information about registration and the guidelines, see this dynamite flyer designed by Valerie Marino at Sawyer Free Library. Thanks to Cape Ann Chamber At-A-Glance weekly newsletter and Rocky Neck’s This Week on Rocky Neck- Art Opportunities for helping to get the word out!car-deadlines-register-now

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Phyllis A Marine Assoc Fall Art Show & Sale @ Marine Railways

In case you missed the one day art show for the Phyllis A Marine Assoc good cause, here’s a link to their current  fundraising campaign. The photographs indicate some of the participating artists–look for their work!

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more than one hour at a time and always smiling

LIKE BREATH ON GLASS, or Living in a Whistler Moment

gloucester-harbor-nocturne-copyright-kim-smithJames McNeill Whistler once said “Paint should not be applied thick. It should be like breath on the surface of a pane of glass.” My question is, which came first, the “soft paintings” of the later half of the 19th and early 20th century or soft focus photos? Knowing that Edward Steichen transitioned from painting to photography, its not hard to imagine that Whistler and Innes were also using photography as a tool.

SNEAK PEAK AND DO NOT MISS THE STUNNING JEREMY ADAMS EXHIBIT AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM!!

jeremy-adams-harpsichords-copyright-kim-smith-copyOpening tomorrow at the Cape Ann Museum, “Voicing the Woods” is a very special exhibition of some of the exquisite instruments created by Jeremy Adams. The exhibit is accompanied by Paul Cary Goldberg photographs of the instruments and of the artist at work .

detail-jeremy-adams-harpischord-copyright-kim-smithDetail Jeremy Adams Double Manual Harpsichord, Collection of Sam and JL Foster

A world renowned instrument maker, Jeremy Adams is a Gloucester artist whose extraordinarily beautiful instruments will be treasured for generations to come. To see these works of art displayed in the light filled gallery of the museum’s top floor is a magnificent gift to the community, and one not to missed. Additionally, a selection of Jeremy’s witty and whimsical furniture is displayed in the Museum’s 1804 Captain Elias Davis House.bent-side-form-jeremy-adams-copyright-kim-smith

Jeremy Adams Bent-side Form, used to bend wood that has been steamed to create the curved side of the harpsichord. The process of steaming wood for the planks is similar to the technique used in boat building.

“Voicing the Woods” opens tomorrow, Saturday, October 22nd, at the Cape Ann Museum. Throughout the months of November, December, and January instrument demonstrations and concerts will be held at the Museum and at the Annisquam Village Church. See the schedule of events here.

To see more examples of Jeremy’s beautiful pieces, visit the Jeremy Adams Instruments website here. dscf9910

About Jeremy Adams, Instrument Maker, from the Cape Ann Museum exhibit catalogue:

A keyboard player from early childhood, Jeremy Adams took his formal training with Roland Sturgis, Gregory Tucker and Melville Smith at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge. In the 1960s, an auspicious time for early music enthusiasts, Adams entered into a six-year apprenticeship at William Dowd’s Cambridge harpsichord shop, where he gained recognition for his skills as a musician and quickly developed his hand as a fine woodworker. (Dowd had established his workshop in the 1950s with harpsichord maker Frank Hubbard, engaging with the international movement to revive historic practices of performance and instrument building.) In the two years following his harpsichord apprenticeship, Adams honed his skills in reed voicing and tonal finishing in an organ building apprenticeship at the Gloucester workshop of Charles Fisk, working on signature instruments at Old West Methodist in Boston and Harvard University, among others. In 1969 Adams opened his own workshop on the North Shore.

Read more here.annisquamAnnisquam Village Church Jeremy Adams Pipe Organ

mission_church_tubaMission Church Boston

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SUPER SPECIAL GORGEOUS 15TH AND FINAL “GLOUCESTER: A COMMUNITY OF NEIGHBORHOODS” QUILT

east-gloucester-quilt-juni-van-dyke-1-copyright-kim-smithThe East Gloucester neighborhood quilt is so beautiful it will tug at your heart strings, especially if it is your neighborhood, as it is ours. So sweetly capturing the spirit of our neighborhood, the quilt is simply a masterpiece of fun and whimsy. Monday’s unveiling at the Rose Baker center was attended by the quilters, friends, and family and we all just reveled in the beauty of the piece. JUNI VAN DYKE, YOU ARE A GIFT TO THIS COMMUNITY!
The East Gloucester Quilt will be on display at both the Rocky Neck Art Association and the Cape Ann Museum. Check back as we will be posting the dates as soon as we know.east-gloucester-quilt-juni-van-dyke-joy-halsted-1-copyright-kim-smith-copy
Juni and Joy Halsted – the center panel with the woman in the red bathing suit was created by Joy Halsted (and is rumored that it is she). 
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A note about the project: “Gloucester: A Community of Neighborhoods” was conceived by Juni Van Dyke and executed by she and her group of fiber artists. Each fabric panel measures approximately five-foot square and illustrates through iconic imagery characteristics unique to Gloucester neighborhoods. The banner’s design in it’s entirety, along with the individual artist’s whimsical designs and choice of fabrics, is utterly captivating and a vibrant visual feast. “Gloucester: A Community of Neighborhoods” quilts has its permanent home at the Cape Ann Museum. 
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East Gloucester Quiltmakers 
Many thanks to Juni for providing the list of quiltmakers
Barbara Jobe               sailboat
Mary Weissblum           bicycle
Ed Hanson                   House in top left corner near Cripple Cove and large Crane
Christina Rhodes          Cripple Cove playground
Judy McGee                 Help with stitching
Lois Stillman                 several trees — also beautiful bucolic scene with small crane
Barbara Maddix             butterflies and bluejay
Genevieve McNamara    condo apartments next to North Shore Arts
Mary McCarl                 Red Cottage Artists (John Sloane & friends)
Joy Halsted                  Lady sitting on beach (centerpiece!)
Lois Dench                   Basket of Flowers
Katherine Keith             North Shore Arts Association & water view
Amanda  Cook              Writers Center
Ron Pool                      Sailboat
Jenny Parisi                  Several Fish
Ida Spinola                   Several Fish
Maggie Rosa                 Beacon Marine
Judy Menicocci              Gloucester Stage Company
Kay Carpenter               Last Stop Variety Store
Connie Troisi                 Several flowers
Emily Soule                   Several flowers
Susan Wright                Golfers
Juni VanDyke                Boats along the top of quilt
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 Amanda Cook’s Writer’s Center
Click the gallery below to see closeups of the beautiful imagery

Join Us

From our friends at Lexicon Gallery & Studios 15 Lexington Avenue, Magnolia, Gloucester MA 01930
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Saturday October 15, 6-10PM
Mix, mingle and meet our juried artists
from around the country at the Rockport Art Association and Museum, 12 Main Street Rockport, MA.
Over 400 on-location paintings, by 40 award winning artists, will be available for purchase
Celebratory drink upon arrival
Complimentary hors d’oeuvres from  Best of Boston award winning, Vinwood Caterers
Ticket cost $60.00 in advance and $75.00 at the door and 100% of the fee can be applied to the purchase of CAPA paintings. Gala to be held at the Rockport Art Association & Museum
12 Main Street, Rockport MA 01966
Lexicon Gallery is thrilled to welcome the CAPA artists to Cape Ann.
Yesterday at Magnolia Beach met Chuck from Cincinnati.
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Scenes from Ray Hassard’s Cape Ann Plein Air painting event at Rocky Neck

Last night Ray Hassard gave a painting demonstration and talk at Rocky Neck Cultural Center. Hassard is the 2016 Cape Ann Plein Air Awards Judge.

You may recognize some of the artwork on display. Montserrat College of Art Presents: Plein Air – Here and Abroad is installed upstairs at RNCC through November 13th. Artists include faculty, alumni and students. The large painting seen directly behind Ray Hassard’s live demo staging is by Maria Malatesta, Fields #31. Also scheduled through November 13th is Beyond Plein Air, an RNAC member group show installed downstairs in the Studio Gallery. Mary Rhinelander’s Patience beckons.

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Karen Berger

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NIGHT PAINTERS

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-andre-lucero-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithAndre Lucero

Last night after sundown I took our sweet pooch Rosie for a walk down Pirate’s Lane. There were not one, nor several, but five Cape Ann Plein Air painters stationed around the docks and all facing towards Rocky Neck and the Inner Harbor. I didn’t want to disturb them too much as they appeared to be racing against the fading light but if you click on the captions, you can learn more about each of these master painters and see galleries of their work. Read more about the Cape Ann Plein Air event here.

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-eric-jacobsen-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithEric Jacobsen

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-patrick-lee-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithPatrick Lee

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-neal-hughes-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithNeal Hughes

cape-ann-plein-air-painter-mitch-baird-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithMitch Baird

 

 

Cape Ann Reads 2016 Children’s Picture Book Contest is now open! Grand prize valued up to $10,000

One new book. Four communities. Everyone reads!

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Find out more about this public call for entry: your book could be the one published by the 4 Cape Ann Libraries  SUBMIT YOUR BOOK

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