Category Archives: Art

Repairs Gone Wrong – botched cleaning on City Hall Honor Roll plaques require corrective restoration

And the qualified help that’s needed is underway!

What do you do when your home repair goes very wrong? Upon evaluation, sometimes you just have to hire a new contractor to remedy mistakes. In the fall of 2014 memorial honor roll plaques in City Hall received some cleaning. The monuments were due some attention. Over time the names were no longer legible and the surfaces were grimy defeating their noble purpose. Gloucester’s outstanding City Archives and the Cape Ann Office of Veterans Services were and are able to help with research for those who can’t come in person or see them clearly.

photo caption: BEFORE photograph of one of four WW1 honor rolls in the rotunda City Hall, ca.2014

©C Ryan bronze plaque city hall 2

 

The 2014 project was not handled by the city nor administered through its committee for the arts, of which I am a member. Funds were raised privately to work on the plaques. Though well intentioned, those restoration efforts were botched, and costly at the time, so I’m told.  The names were made more visible, but the plaques were damaged and results are scratched, streaked and blotchy.

photo after poor bronze plaque cleaning splotchy © C Ryan 20170719

A small annual budget (FY2018 $4000) that’s set aside for care of City arts and culture and monuments must now be redirected to fix the fix. Sometimes you have to hire a new contractor to remedy mistakeswhich is frustrating, but necessary. Perhaps the 2014 group will reimburse this cost.

Throughout 2018, you may see specialists from Skylight Studios repairing plaques within City Hall through the Committee for the Arts on behalf of the City. (Gloucester residents may recall that Skylight Studios was hired by the Commonwealth to restore the bronze doors of the Abram Piat Andrew Bridge; the doors were temporarily displayed at Cape Ann Museum before being reinstalled.)

The detailed work on the City Hall plaques will be completed in brief, focused intervals. One plaque in the rotunda will be restored last, because it’s a great opportunity to show before and after examples of contemporary restoration projects- the good, the bad and the quality. As the plaques are repaired, the detail of the raised carving and borders and most importantly the names of so many veterans will become easier and easier to read and remember.

Gloucester Ma Veterans Honor Rolls and Monuments

GROUND FLOOR, CITY HALL
Spanish American War- “Men of Gloucester who served in the War with Spain volunteers all 1898-1902. Gloucester ‘s men, serving on land and sea won for their city  the honor of giving to her country the largest per capita of men in this war. Erected by the City of Gloucester 1930.

Honor Roll War with Spain City Hall cleaning needs to be redone  ©c ryan 20180221_095556.jpg

2014 wonky cleaning needs repair (Honor Roll to be repaired sometime 2018)

World War I Honor Rolls (rotunda and upstairs)
World Ward II Honor Roll (outside clerk’s office)
Korean Honor Roll (outside clerk’s office)
Vietnam Honor Roll (outside clerk’s office; Brian Hamilton 1980 painting of fisherman)

just outside Kyrouz Auditorium, FIRST FLOOR, CITY HALL
“Civil War (1861 1865)This tablet records the service of Company G 8th Regiment MVM in the Civil War; and War with Spain (1898 1899) occupation of Cuba; and World War 1917 1919″ Corrective repairs are underway on this trio Honor Roll. Waxy build up added in 2014 is being removed all over, and names in a small lower right corner have been attended.

 

The multi story memorial to Gloucester fishermen lost at sea was a major public art project designed and hand painted by Norma Cuneo with Irma Wheeler in the 1970s. Their work was the basis for the cenotaph installed in 2000 by the Man at the Wheel on Stacy Boulevard.

detail City hall interior Gloucester MA with detail of Gloucester IMG_20180222_125029.jpg

O’Maley presents Shrek the Musical JR features double cast and 65 students!

Please join us…

Shrek at Gloucester O Maley 2018

WHAT: O’Maley Innovation Middle School – O’Maley Academy Drama Club’s Production of Shrek The Musical Jr. “Beauty is in the eye of the ogre in Shrek The Musical JR., based on the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film and fantastic Broadway musical. Music by Jeanine Tesori. Book and Lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire. based on DreamWorks Animation Motion Picture and the book by William Steig.”

WHEN: The double cast production will be performing 6 public shows over the first 2 weekends in March:

(Cast X)   Friday, March 2, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.

(Cast Y)   Saturday, March 3, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.                                

(Cast X)   Sunday, March 4, 2018 – 1:00 P.M.

(Cast Y)   Friday, March 9, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.

(Cast X)   Saturday, March 10, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.

(Cast Y)   Sunday, March 11, 2018 – 1:00 P.M.

WHERE: O’Maley Auditorium, 32 Cherry Street, Gloucester, MA

WHO: Our production showcases 65 sixth, seventh, & eighth grade students in the cast & crew!

WHY: Besides being incredibly fun, musical theater helps young people develop many of the skills necessary for success in today’s world: Self-Confidence, Literacy, Communication, Imagination, Empathy, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Self-Discipline, Community Awareness, Public Speaking, and Teamwork.

Sincerely,

Drama Club Co-Directors: Sharon Crowley, Joanne Horne, Lauren Horne, & Leslie Sellers

Costume Designer: Linda Stockman and Choreographer: TS Burnham

*O’Maley Drama Club is part of O’Maley Academy, a free, afterschool grant-funded program administered by: Site Coordinator Allison Cousins and Family Coordinator Mary White 

Sound Harbor’s FIRST Open Mic on March 4th

NEW! Middle and High School students are invited to participate in Sound Harbor’s first Open Mic hosted by Renee Dupuis March 4th, 2018, 2PM-5PM. All instruments welcome.

1231.jpg

Check out their updated website , like ’em on Facebook, and sign up for their newsletter to find out about all their great musical offerings.

Happy President’s Day: FDR in Gloucester, Carrancho family and FSA photos

 

FDR in Gloucester MA.jpg

2015 Manny and Joanna Carrancho, Trib and Ken Joyce and extended family visiting from VA and elsewhere for reunion stop at the HarborWalk exhibition Fishermans Wharf  to see manny panel.jpg

You can find a historic panel about Roosevelt’s visit included as part of the HarborWalk Fisherman’s Wharf display. I’m posting this in tribute to Manny Carrancho. The photographs and history shared by Manny Carrancho (1923-2017), Ken Joyce and their family for the Fisherman’s Wharf exhibit make the FDR plaque incredible. The 2015 photograph above shows the beautiful Carrancho family at Fisherman Wharf by the historic plaque vastly improved by his photos, knowledge and stories.

Manny Carrancho on Fisherman s Wharf exhibition Gloucester MA

Photo caption UL: 1933 En route to ME, President Roosevelt visits Gloucester Harbor.  Ben Pine and others on board the yacht, Amberjack, present an Emile Gruppe painting of the racing schooner, Gertrude L Thebaud, to commemorate their advocacy sail to Washington DC just two months prior. Photo caption UR 1942 Ben Pine’s vessel, Old Glory, at Fisherman’s Wharf. Some of the crew continued with Pine’s vessel the Puritan. Credit: Howard Liberman, September 1942, FSA/OWI photograph collection, Library of Congress.  Photo caption LR: 1943 On a first voyage, young deckhand, Manuel “Manny” Carrancho, mends nets with twine man, first mate Mario Vagos on Ben Pine’s vessel, Old Glory.  Captain Oscar Riberio and Manny became close friends; the Captain and his wife, Irene, were Best Man and Maid of Honor at the wedding of Manny and Joanna Carrancho, née Cecilio. Manny Carrancho helped identify the Howard Liberman photographs in the Library of Congress after a GMG post I wrote in March 2014!

you can click thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

FBI sting operations: MA art and MA fishing

May2_gardner972x663.jpgFBI posed as art buyers for Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist scam

Thirteen works of art were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum  March 18, 1990, one of the highest profile art thefts of the century and listed as #2 on the FBI top 10 art crimes list. There has been an ongoing investigation for recovery ever since including incentive for tips that was raised to ten million dollars. Todd Andrew Desper of West Virginia had the dead stupid and criminal intent to advertise the Gardner Museum’s masterpieces, The Storm of the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt (for 5 million), and The Concert by Vermeer (for 50 million) …wait for it…on Craigslist overseas. FBI posed as potential buyers and arrested Desper May 20, 2017. He was indicted by a federal grand jury in Boston on July 20, 2017. Here’s a link to the FBI press release. Last week, Desper plead guilty to wire fraud and attempted wire fraud. Sentencing is scheduled for May 15th.

Meanwhile, the Berkshire Museum case is pending Single Justice decision.

“Famed Fishing Port Shudders as Its Codfather Goes to Jail

excerpt from New York Times Feb 11, 2018 article by Jess Bidgood:

“Carlos Rafael, who ruled New Bedford’s fishing of cod and haddock, was caught lying about his catches. Now the piers have grown quiet.” 

“Carlos Rafael, whose initials are emblazoned on boats all over this port city, boasted that his fishing empire was worth even more than official records showed. His trick? When he caught fish that are subject to strict catch limits, like gray sole or cod, he would report that his nets were filled with something far more plentiful, like haddock.

“We call them something else, it’s simple,” Mr. Rafael told visitors who seemed interested in buying his business. “We’ve been doing it for over 30 years.” He showed off a special ledger labeled “cash.” And he described an under-the-table deal he had going with a New York fish buyer, saying at one point, “You’ll never find a better laundromat.”

But Mr. Rafael’s visitors turned out to be Internal Revenue Service agents, and the conversations, caught on tape and described in court documents, began the unraveling of Mr. Rafael, whose reign over a segment of this region’s fishing industry gave him his larger-than-life nickname, “the Codfather…” read the complete article

I didn’t know John Bullard, NOAA Northeast Administrator who worked there from 2012-and retired Jan 5, 2018–was a former Mayor of New Bedford, despite good coverage on his tenure in the Gloucester Daily Times. I missed that detail but it jumped out to me with the sting stories. Maybe more reason to be recused from Gloucester decisions…

$750,000 #NEH grant opportunity for Gloucester…so many possible ideas and projects!

Archival documentation of a federal grant awarded to Gloucester and nationally recognized for its innovation at the time: reclaiming the City dump for an atheletic field at the High School. Photographs of the project included a sweeping vista from atop Hovey Street. Innovative public works dump reclaimed as Gloucester High School track WPA Annual Bulletin

overlay-banner2_originalShared projects and working together are a focus for a new 2018 NEH grant opportunity.

Contact Mayor Romeo Theken’s arts & culture hotline sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov  by Febraury 28 to add to a list of potential projects for Gloucester for this NEH Deadline, March 15, or to consider as other funding opportunities arise.

Mayor Romeo Theken shares the 2018 press release from the Commonwealth:

Activities supported by National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant funds include:
 capital expenditures such as the design, purchase, construction, restoration
or renovation of facilities and historic landscapes;
 the purchase of equipment and software;
 the documentation of cultural heritage materials that are lost or imperiled:
 the sustaining of digital scholarly infrastructure;
 the preservation and conservation of collections; and
 the sharing of collections.

The grant below is a new grant from NEH and could be a great opportunity to enhance your local cultural or historical organizations. Please share it far and wide. And let us know if we can provide a letter of support for an application from your community.  Regards, Rick Jakious

Good afternoon, 
The National Endowment for the Humanities has just announced a new grant program to support humanities infrastructures. Cultural institutions, such as libraries, museums, archives, colleges and universities, and historic sites, are eligible to apply for grants of up to $750,000.
 
These challenge grants, which require a match of nonfederal funds, may be used toward capital expenditures such as construction and renovation projects, purchase of equipment and software, sharing of humanities collections between institutions, documentation of lost or imperiled cultural heritage, sustaining digital scholarly infrastructure, and preservation and conservation of humanities collections.
 
The application deadline for the first NEH Infrastructure and Capacity-Building Challenge Grants is March 15, 2018. Interested applicants should direct questions about grant proposals to challenge@neh.govor 202-606-8309. 
 
Please consider sharing this exciting new funding opportunity with cultural institutions in your district.
 
Thank you,Timothy H. Robison
Director of Congressional Affairs
National Endowment for the Humanities
400 7th Street, SW  4th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20506
(202) 606-8273

Innovative and worthy contemporary Gloucester possibilities abound: shared Archives (NSAA, Rocky Neck, Sargent House, City Archives, CAM, Legion, Libraries, Wards historical societies, etc); Digitize City Archives; Digitize Gloucester Daily Times archives; building and historic landscape projects city owned (City Archives, City Hall, Legion, Fitz Henry Lane, Fire Station, Stage Fort, beaches, etc) or in partnership; DPW work; on and on.

Additional grant opportunities, news, and deadlines: Read more

Artist Kathy Roberts

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A FUN CLASS THAT WILL NURTURE YOUR CREATIVE SIDE?
NEW SPRING PAINTING WORKSHOP, STARTING in MARCH 2018, MONDAYS, 6:00-8:00 pm. Ongoing class.
Beginner and Intermediate students welcomed. Sketching and Watercoloring painting will be the
focus in a small group setting. A demonstration will be provided at each class. For more information call 978-853-7825.

 

Massachusetts Attorney General assent letter for Berkshire Museum battle

Here’s the complete official doc while awaiting Single Justice ruling. More to come.

Assent to Plaintiff's Motion for entry of Judgement Feb 9 2018.jpg

EXHIBIT A

Letterhead MA AGO Berkshire Museum decision.jpg

VIA EMAIL February 9, 2018
William F. Lee, Esq. WilmerHale 60 State Street Boston, MA 02109
Re: Sale of Works of Art by Trustees of the Berkshire Museum
Dear Attorney Lee,

Thank you for your and the Trustees of the Berkshire Museum’s (the “Museum”) continued cooperation while the Attorney General’s Office (“AGO”) investigated the proposed sale of 40 of the Museum’s most valuable works of fine art in order to fund a “New Vision.” As the AGO indicated to the Museum last September, after reviewing the proposed sale of all 40 items and planned use of proceeds ($76 million or more based on auction estimates), the AGO concluded that the objects that have been deaccessioned and offered for sale are subject to restrictions that prohibit the Museum from selling them in the manner proposed absent court approval lifting or modifying the restrictions. As we have also discussed, and as we outline further in this letter, while we continue to believe that these restrictions apply, the investigation has led us to agree with the Museum that it would be impracticable for the Museum to continue its operations without a sale, subject to, however, certain guidelines. Therefore, the AGO is prepared to support the Museum in its request to the Supreme Judicial Court for approval to sell up to 40 items subject to certain agreed-upon sale parameters.

Proposed Sale:
The Museum first provided notice of the planned sale on June 22, 2017. The notice indicated that the Museum was proposing to sell 40 works of fine art from its collection in order to fund a “New Vision,” which will include the creation of a $40 million “endowment” and dedicate $20 million to facilities upgrades and repairs. Over the course of further communications with the AGO pertaining to the AGO’s investigation, the Museum asserted that it is in dire financial need and requires a significant capital infusion in order for the Museum to be able to continue to fulfill its charitable mission. Further, the Museum asserted that the only way it could achieve that necessary capital infusion was by selling the identified 40 of works of fine art from its permanent collection. The Museum stated that it had come to this decision as part of a two-year process undertaken by the Board of Directors to consider alternative directions for the Museum that would create a more sustainable financial future for the Museum.

-page 2 of 5-

AGO Investigation:
Upon receipt of the Museum’s June 22, 2017 notice letter, the AGO undertook a careful investigation of the Museum’s plans. As part of this review, the AGO requested and reviewed over 2300 documents bearing on the Museum and its Board’s decision-making process as well as donor intent and restrictions on objects donated or bequeathed to the Museum. These documents included, inter alia, board materials, minutes and agendas, committee materials, meeting minutes and agendas, board retreat materials. Museum policies and procedures, other internal Museum and board communications, files associated with each of the artworks that the Museum plans to sell, archival director files, and other historical files. The AGO also interviewed Museum employees, board members, and third party witnesses regarding, inter alia, the Museum’s history, the Board’s efforts to date to stabilize the Museum’s finances, the Board’s decisionmaking process related to deaccessioning and selling art from its collection, the Museum’s consideration of alternatives to selling art to revitalize the Museum, the intent of donors, and employee experience at the Museum.

In addition to the AGO’s review of documents and interviews with witnesses, the AGO also worked to understand all components of the Museum’s decision. In doing so, the AGO consulted with and relied on experts to provide the AGO with information regarding museum industry best practices, the Museum’s finances, and the impact of a decision to deaccession and sell art from a museum’s permanent collection.

The AGO is charged with review of the proposed sale for compliance with charities law, including an assessment of such factors as whether there are any restrictions that limit or prohibit the Museum from selling the chosen objects and whether, if such restrictions exist, it is impossible or impracticable for the Museum to fulfill its charitable mission and meet the intent of the donors without seeking court approval to lift or amend those restrictions. A summary of our conclusions related to this part of our review is described below.

1. Restrictions On The Works of Art Proposed for Sale
As detailed elsewhere (e.g., in its filings in the litigation referenced above) the AGO believes that all of the works of art deaccessioned and proposed for sale are subject to one or more restrictions that limit the Museum’s ability to proceed with its planned sale and use of proceeds to fund an endowment, pay for operating expenses and fund renovations. The Museum continues to believe no restrictions (beyond the Museum’s charitable purposes) apply. In light of certain findings from the AGO’s investigation described below, and in an effort to avoid unnecessary expenditure of charitable and government resources on litigation to determine which view of the restrictions would ultimately be found to be legally correct, the AGO and the Museum have agreed on a framework for requesting authorization for a sale under specific conditions. First, all of the 40 works of art identified for sale have been, until recently, part of the Museum’s permanent collection. These works of art constitute most of the monetary value of the Museum’s fine art collection and have historically been devoted to fulfilling the art component of the Museum’s three-part mission. The Museum has also long represented itself to donors and the public as an art museum (even though not solely an art museum). Further, the Museum policies and professional affiliations in place at the time the objects were selected for deaccessioning reflect a commitment by the Museum to hold its art for art puiposes, and

Read more

So this is March- Rocky Neck Now 2018 Annual Members Show & don’t forget Gallery 53 deadline

Photos and press releases shared with Good Morning Gloucester: two spring update releases from Patricia Conant with Rocky Neck news– save the date, deadlines, exhibition info, panels, celebrations and a poetry reading.

ROCKY NECK NOW 2018: The Annual Spring Members’ Show
Exhibition Dates: March 1 –April 8, 12-4 PM
Cultural Center at Rocky Neck 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA
Galleries open: Thursday through Sunday, Noon-4 PM
Opening Reception:  Saturday, March 3, 2-5 PM
Panel Discussion with Artists: Sunday, March 11, 2018, at 2 PM.
(DEADLINE Gallery 53 application March 15, 2018 see below)
Poetry Reading: “Rising Spring” Three poets present, Sunday, March 25 at 3 PM.

The Rocky Neck Art Colony (RNAC) opens the season with the highly anticipated “Rocky Neck Now 2018: The Annual Spring Members’ Show” running for six weeks from Thursday, March 1 through Sunday, April 8, 2018.  The exhibition features recent work by more than 30 of the Rocky Neck Art Colony’s  artists.  This show, in both the upper and lower galleries of the Cultural Center includes a wide range of artistic interpretations with abstract, representational and expressive styles in all media, 2D and 3D. The galleries are open each Thursday through Sunday Noon-4 PM. The public is invited to meet the artists at the opening reception on Saturday, March 3, 2-5 PM. All are invited to receptions and events with refreshments, admission and nearby parking free of charge.

The Artists

Some of the more than 30 RNAC well-known, participating artists include Nubar Alexanian, Kathleen Gerdon Archer, John Bassett, Katherine Coakley, Mary Cole, Yhanna Coffin, Terry Del Percio, Robert Diebboll, Judith Goetemann, , Leslie Heffron, Richard Honan, Jane Keddy, Randolph Kelts, Otto Laske, Brenda Malloy, Ruth Mordecai, Ed Mowrey, Tom Nihan, Regina Piantedosi, David Piemonte, Mary Rhinelander, Martha Swanson, Marilyn Swift, Bonnie Twomey, Connie Vallis, Rokhaya Waring and Karen Watson among many others.

Special Events

The Art Colony presents two special events during the exhibition.  On Sunday, March 11, 2018, at 2 PM, the public is invited to a panel discussion featuring selected participating “Rocky Neck Now” artists.  Audience participation will be encouraged, and the discussion will cover a wide range of topics, many based on questions asked by audience members.

For a lovely afternoon of inspiring words and art, be sure to attend “Rising Spring,” a program of poetry readings by Nadine Boughton, Mary Cole, and Patrick Doud on Sunday, March 25 at 3 PM.

A Celebration

As this is the first exhibition since major renovations to the main gallery of the Cultural Center, “Rocky Neck Now 2018” serves as a grand re-opening celebration. Cultural Center renovations were funded in part by a generous grant from the Mass Cultural Council, a state agency that promotes excellence, inclusion, education, and diversity in the arts. The work that included the installation of updated lighting, the application of acoustic materials to improve sound quality in the hall, the addition of hangers to allow ceiling mounted installations are in place as are painting and repairs. More information on all Cultural Center events is available by visiting the website at www.rockyneckartcolony.org, by email at info@rockyneckartcolony.org or telephone 978 515-7004.

The Cultural Center at Rocky Neck, 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA 01930, the official Welcome Center for Rocky Neck and home of the Art Colony, hosts exhibitions, workshops, meetings, lectures and cultural events of all kinds. The Center accommodates up to 100 people. For information about renting the facility for a meeting, theatrical or musical performance, a small wedding or anniversary, both private or for the community, please contact: director@rockyneckartcolony.org

Rocky Neck Art Colony Seeks New Members for Gallery 53 on Rocky Neck Application Deadline: March 15, 2018

The Rocky Neck Art Colony (RNAC) is seeking new members for Gallery 53 and is currently accepting membership applications for this cooperatively run gallery. Gallery 53 is ideally situated between the Rudder and Studio Restaurants on Rocky Neck Avenue in Gloucester, MA. Applications must be received by March 15, 2018. For more information see http://rockyneckartcolony.org/gallery-53-on-rocky-neck/ or call the RNAC office at 978-515-7004.

Cy pres and mon-ey: Berkshire Museum #AGO greenlight sale & cue up Massachusetts SJO

Detail from Norman Rockwell Blacksmith's Boy Hell and Toe for Nov 1940 Saturday Evening Post, Collection Berkshire Museum to be sold at Sothebys

Cy pres petition it is! The Berkshire Museum had to demonstrate dire financial need to modify any restrictions on charter or mission, like selling its priceless art core and renovating its landmark building else risk withering and shuttering. Well, the museum has succeeded to the next round according to its website. Here’s their summary of the agreement between the Berkshire Museum and the Attorney General Office that was sent to the Single Justice Court. I have not seen a release from the AGO, yet. I’ll link to the actual document(s) soon.

Generally after a filing is ready to be reviewed, there are a couple of route options for a Single Justice. The SJO can act on the filed papers, order a hearing, or pass it back to the full court. What will the SJO decide with this one?

The Museum’s summary reads like a slam dunk for the Berkshire Museum New Vision position. An unnamed American Museum will acquire Norman Rockwell Shuffleton’s Barbershop at an undisclosed price (which should have been negotiated high enough to cover all fundraising goals if it was to happen at all. Public auction would have gone higher.) Regardless, whatever sale price was set, that purchase does not preclude further sales according to the light conditions. I suspect that’s to appease Sotheby’s, in possession of all the art and waiting for this to sort out.

Sotheby’s would rather auction that Rockwell. The Rockwell family is not part of this agreement, and was waiting to review the papers as it impacts their suit vs. the museum.

Which museum committed funds for Shuffleton Barbershop and can pounce? Lucas Museum of Narrative Art could be a contender: George Lucas and Steven Spielberg are major Rockwell collectors.  Perhaps Crystal Bridges Museum backed by Wal-Mart heiress, Alice Walton, strikes again. Both were two likely clients at Sotheby’s, too. The reputation and value of the art targeted for sale will continue to rise. Legal firms, auction houses, and collectors are poised and AGOs across the country are trending pro boards and trustee, since 2000. The leadership at the Berkshire Museum failed to raise its own money for its new vision, was unable to brand despite possessing masterpieces, celebrate its landmark building, and imagine innovative science and history programming built around Calders and Rockwells. Let’s give them more money and the art, too?

I wonder if there is a percentage of SJO decisions opposing agreements like this one, overturning a lower court ruling and now a proposed agreement with the AGO-state? The February 5th joint statement confirmed that the Berkshire Museum and AGO were at an impasse related to standing. Come on SJO!

Berkshire Museum summary of agreement filed with MA AGO to Single Justice

shuffleton-s-barbershop-1950read the summary Read more

Our own Sinikka Nogelo has been inducted into the NAWA

Wonderful article on Sinikka Nogelo in the Gloucester Daily Times

Among the many mediums Gloucester artist Sinikka Nogelo has worked in is television. As director of Cape Ann TV for 29 years, she pioneered early local public access programming (CATV) with one camera, a tiny budget, a lot of ingenuity and some “terrific teamwork.” Until retiring from that post back in 2011, her first love — art — went on hold. Except, that is, for weekends, when she was what she calls a “beach chair artist.”

Nogelo, who last spring was inducted in a ceremony in New York City into the prestigious National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) is still a beach chair artist when she wants to be.

One of her most ambitious recent works, “All Wired” — a 5-by-8-by-4-foot environmental conceptual sculpture made from no fewer than 3,000 colored wire hangers — was constructed for a 2017 exhibition in Newburyport’s Maudslay Park while Nogelo basked in “a collection of beach chairs” that stretched from Gloucester (Good Harbor and Magnolia) to New Hampshire (New Found Lake).

 But for the most part, the artist may nowadays be found in her studio at Gloucester’s Cripple Cove, where there is no saying what medium she’ll be working in on any given moment. Although painting has been her primary medium, as an ever more passionate environmentalist, she has in recent years found herself increasingly drawn to working with found objects, as a way to conceptualize environmental statements.

Metallic materials, cans washed up on beaches, trash — litter of all kinds, contours and colors — have in her hands been transformed into sculptural installations and wall pieces. One of those pieces, “Washed Up” — a wall piece protesting beach litter — has been chosen by the Massachusetts chapter of NAWA for exhibit at RADAR, an environmentally focused show opening Sunday, Feb. 11, at Boston’s @artlery160 gallery.

This is the first time Nogelo’s work has been juried into a NAWA show, but it is not her only work in the show. “Tundra Melt,” an intricate acrylic that suggests glacier fragmenting to address global warming, will also be nearby.

One of several Cape Ann artists who are members of NAWA — including Cynthia Journey and Donna Caselden whose works will be in the show as well — Nogelo still seems to be more than a little awed to find herself in the august company of NAWA’s “awesome” artists.

Founded in 1889, “to create greater opportunity for professional women artists in a male-dominated art world,” NAWA has counted among its members no less than the great 20th century Impressionist Mary Cassat and sculptural iconclast Louise Nevelson, as well as Gertrude Whitney, founder of New York’s newly relocated Whitney Museum of American Art. But it was the trail-blazing 21st century contemporary feminist Judy Chicago who seemed to most impress the Gloucester artist.

“I was awestruck,” says Nogelo. She could not believe that she’d ever see the day she’s see her name on the membership roster with Chicago’s. “I thought, Judy Chicago! I guess I felt sort of intimidated.” But like Chicago, experimentation is the hallmark of Sinikka Nogelo’s work. She has, she says, been influenced by everything from her Scandinavian background (she was born in Finland, but raised in America) to her years teaching university in Africa, to her years of video production at CATV, to her love of waves and weaving.

A founding member of Gloucester’s now defunct women’s art cooperative and gallery, Center and Main, she has always been supportive of and inspired by fellow women artists. “We have so many good ones on Cape Ann,” she says.

One of them, Donna Caseldon, was with her last spring when she traveled to New York City’s Rubin Museum for NAWA’s formal induction ceremony. Caseldon, president of the Annisquam Sewing Circle, whose talents took her to Washington last holiday season to join a contingent of designers chosen to transform the White House for Christmas, is, like Nogelo, primarily known for her oils and acrylics. But at the RADAR exhibit, she will be showing a conceptual environmental piece.

Likewise Manchester artist, Cynthia Journey, will make her RADAR debut with a wall installation, “Breaking Through,” one of several conceptual sculptures she has produced this past year to protest current disregard for ethical management of the planet. With a newly opened gallery on Rockport’s Bearskin Neck, Journey joins Nogelo and Caseldon on Cape Ann’s growing roster of rising women artists to be counted among the “awesome” greats of NAWA.

 IF YOU GO

What: “RADAR” an environmental art show juried by David Thomson and Tameka Eastman-Coburn (Gallery Director) of @artlery160 gallery.

When: Sunday, Feb. 11, to May 4. Opening Reception: Saturday, Feb. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.

Where: @artlery160 gallery, 160 Federal St., Boston. Phone: 617-699-2713

For more information, visit: www.nawama.org and www artlery.com/artlery160

Pia Juhl & Peter Herbert at Jane Deering Gallery, reception February 10th

Two person February exhibition at Jane Deering Gallery is one to see! See below for more information about the exhibition and the artists fromt the gallery’s press release:

Pia Juhl . After the Storm 2015 . Acrylic on canvas . 20x30 inches .jpgNew Work: Peter Herbert & Pia Juhl opens February 2nd at Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street in Gloucester with a reception on Saturday February 10th from 4-6pm.  Peter Herbert’s series of land and seascapes examines the play of light and color above and below the horizon line.  Also included are images inspired by Degas’ visit to Saint-Valery-sur-Sommes in the South of France and small works that focus on the glare of early morning light in Annisquam.  Pia Juhl writes: ‘I love to paint landscapes of Cape Ann and presently am concentrating on large-scale subjects.’ Glacial boulders, the marsh land, monolithic stones, the vast interaction of sky and sea — all of this has captured her eye.  She breaks down a scene into its essential colors and shapes, using the brush to ‘feel’ the painting’s form.  Both artists live and work on Cape Ann.  This is their first exhibition showing together.  Gallery hours: Friday-Sunday 12noon-5:00pm or by appointment by calling 978-283-2263 or 978-257-6608.

Peter Herbert studied at the Brooklyn Museum, the Art Students League of New York, with Brooklyn realist Andrew Reiss, master painter David Levine, and under the mentorship of Gloucester painters Erma Wheeler and Gordon Goetemann. His work has been exhibited at The Crosby Gallery, New York, NY, The Century Association of New York City, the Wenniger Gallery, the North Shore Arts Association, The Sawyer Free Library and in solo and group exhibitions at The Annisquam Exchange Art Gallery and the Annisquam Village Art Show.

Pia Juhl was born in Denmark and after meeting her American husband there, moved to Boston.  Early on, Edward Hopper was a great influence.  Today, her painting is more intuitive and influenced by Milton Avery, Wolf Kahn and Catalan artist Jaume Muxart. Her work has been exhibited widely on Cape Ann at Flatrocks Gallery, Cove Gallery, Annisquam Exchange Art Gallery and Art in the Barn.  She has also shown at Faneuil Hall in Boston and in Harvard MA. 

Jane Deering Gallery supports regional artists by offering work and exhibition space during the months January, February, March, April & May

Peter Herbert . Sky and Sea No.1 . 2017 Oil on canvas . 24x30 inches

breaking news: JOINT STATEMENT from #BerkshireMuseum and Office of the Attorney General #AGO shuffling to Single Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court

Emily Snyder, spokesperson for the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General and Carol Bosco Baumann for the Berkshire Museum convey a shared goal: “We are working together to resolve this matter, recognizing our shared responsibility for the collection of the Berkshire Museum and to the community the museum serves. We are committed to helping this museum secure its future.” 

Here’s the complete joint status report:

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
APPEALS COURT
2017-J-0510

Berkshire County, ss.
_________________________________________
THOMAS ROCKWELL, JARVIS ROCKWELL, PETER ROCKWELL,
TOM PATTI, TOM PATTI DESIGN LLC, JAMES LAMME, DONALD MACGILLIS, JONAS DOVYDENAS, and JEAN ROUSSEAU,
Plaintiffs,
v.
TRUSTEES OF THE BERKSHIRE MUSEUM and MAURA HEALEY, in her capacity as Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Defendants.
CONSOLIDATED WITH  
JAMES HATT, KRISTIN HATT, AND ELIZABETH WEINBERG, individually and derivatively on behalf of the Trustees of the Berkshire Museum, Plaintiffs,
v.
TRUSTEES OF THE BERKSHIRE MUSEUM, et al., Defendants.
_________________________________________________________________________
On Appeal From Berkshire Superior Court
___________________________________________________________________________
Joint Status Report of the Attorney General and Trustees of the Berkshire

Date: 02/05/2018

The Substituted Plaintiff-Appellant Attorney General Maura Healey (“AGO”) and Defendant-Appellee Trustees of the Berkshire Museum (the “Museum”) submit this joint status report.

The AGO has now concluded its investigation into the decision by the Museum to sell 40 works from its collection. The additional time granted by this Court for the investigation permitted the AGO, with the Museum’s cooperation, to undertake additional review of inter alia over 1500 documents and interview further key Museum employees and board members. The AGO believes that the 40 works at issue are subject to restrictions, which the Museum does not believe exist. The AGO and the Museum have agreed to resolve these differences and will file a petition for judicial relief pursuant to the principles of equitable instruction, deviation and/or cy pres with the Single Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court on February 9, 2018 or shortly thereafter. The AGO will support the relief requested by the petition. In addition, the Museum will not sell any of the 40 works until the SJC acts on the petition or until the Berkshire County Superior Court enters final judgment regarding the AGO’s complaint in the matter captioned Rockwell et al. v. Trustees of the Berkshire Museum, No. 17-253 (allowing, if the Museum should prevail, for 7 calendar days post-judgment for the AGO to seek further relief pending appeal), should such proceedings again become necessary. The Museum and the AGO intend to file a motion in the trial court requesting that proceedings there be held in abeyance while the aforementioned petition is pending. As a result of these commitments by the Museum, the AGO does not seek any further injunctive relief or stay of Superior Court proceedings at this time.

shuffleton-s-barbershop-1950

#AcornPress in action: Mary Rhinelander demonstrates printmaking at #GloucesterMA O’Maley Middle School, also

the upcoming weekly workshop at Cape Ann Museum that Mary Rhinelander will be teaching is SOLD OUT, again. Look for future offerings.

The very dedicated and talented O’Maley art teacher, Brett Dunton, shares some action shots of fine artist and master printmaker, Mary Rhinelander, guest teaching printmaking with the authentic Acorn press in one of the 8th Grade art classes at O’Maley Innovation Middle school. Note the foot.

DSC_2375

Fine artist Mary Rhinelander guest teaching linoleum block printing on historic Acorn press at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, with teacher Brett Dunton art class, Gloucester, MA February 2018

Historic portraits sometimes belie the physicality of the process

einonatti on press

Aino Natti (Isabel’s grandfather)

Wonder if the O’Maley students will try this energetic technique? photograph of Aino Clarke from the Cape Ann Musem Folly Cove collection  Read more

Super Bowl #MuseumBowl wager @MFABoston vs @philamuseum

The 2018 #SuperBowl LII winner will trigger a museum loan from the losing city’s rival fine arts institution. If the Patriots win, @philamuseum will lend Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky by Benjamin West. Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston. The MFA would lend Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis) by John Singleton Copley, which the MFA modified for #museumbowl twitter trash talk vs Atlanta.

Super Bowl 52 bet

Philadelphia Museum created a video this year.

When the Patriots win the Eagles might feel more like this woodblock print from the MFA famous prints and drawings collection: **Sad** Eagle on a Pine Branch in the Rain, Isoda Koryusai, ca.1770s, Japanese Edo period, Bigelow collection.

eagle on a pine branch in the rain MFA Japanese Edo period ca1770s Isoda koryusai.jpg

On Friday the two museum twitter accounts will throw down. I wonder which works the MFA will modify this year for the trash talk on twitter, maybe their iconic Copley Paul Revere?

The Philadelphia Museum of Art could doctor their Rubens Prometheus… if so one hopes with the logo, not a player. (And one could argue even still that it’s in the Patriots favor as knowledge of foresight for the win, and Prometheus comes out all right in the end.)

Phil Mus Art Rubens Prometheus W1950-3-1

Last year the MFA did a great job with the Thomas Sully–but hey what about that eagle installed nearby.

_DSC3440a.jpg

Thomas Sully (American (born in England), 1783–1872) The Passage of the Delaware, 1819, American wing, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

There are a lot of eagles in the MFA collection…Too dark?

homer MFA MacIntyre eagle MFA (2).jpg

Winslow Homer. The Fog Warning. 1885. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. mash up with Samuel McIntyre Eagle ca 1786-89 for cupola at Derby house 70 Washington Street Salem, MFA collection

What would you pick for the MFA #MuseumBowl?

Cape Ann Museum teams up with YMCA and MAGMA to promote youth art and sport this February vacation

Within its galleries or on the local road, Cape Ann Museum’s inventive partnering promotes art and projects all children can take part in.

Cape Ann Museum education coordinator, Kirsten Vega, shares special upcoming February programming including two new offerings during school vacation 2018: movement games and art at MAGMA, plus basketeball and art with the YMCA.

Thursday, February 8, 10:30-11:30 am: Young at Art – Folly Cove Designer Valentines. Bring your toddler to Cape Ann Museum for Young at Art on the second Thursday of each month. During this special Valentine’s Day session, we’ll explore the Folly Cove Designers exhibit, touch printmaking tools, learn a song with hand motions, and print our own Valentine’s Day cards. Recommended for children ages 4 and younger with an adult. Free for members or with Museum admission. 

Saturday, February 10, 10:00-12:00 pm: Valentine Workshop with Coco Berkman. Hand print your own animal themed Valentine’s Day cards in printmaker Coco Berkman’s family workshop! Participants leave with a set of cards. Ages 6+ / Free for families.  Space is limited; e-mail kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org for reservations.

 February 20 & 21, 1:00-4:00 pm February School Vacation: Let’s Move at the Museum! Wednesday, February 21 | 1:00-4:00 pm Play creative movement games with Sarah Slifer Swift of Movement Arts Gloucester (MAGMA) studio and create art that moves. Thursday, February 22   | 1:00-4:00 pmWhat’s art got to do with basketball? Shoot hoops at the YMCA and create basketball player sculptures inspired by Walker Hancock.  

Saturday, February 27: 1:00-1:45pm: Family Tour  A tour for history detectives of all ages! Discover the story of Cape Ann by taking a closer look at 10 objects from paintings to film. End your tour in the Activity Center with hands-on fun and art-making. Recommended for families with children under 12. Free for CAM members or with Museum admission. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

CAM Kids February Break 2018 Poster.jpg

Breaking news: #BerkshireMuseum investigation- Unopposed Motion as Attorney General Maura Healey requests a one week extension

The Arc and the Quadrant by Alexander Calder, collection of Berkshire Museum-- first public commission for Calder, a pair of sculptures for niche alongside museum theater

Alexander Calder’s first public sculpture commission was for the Berkshire museum (two sculptures for site specific niches alongside the theater)

Today, January 29, 2018 was the next milestone in the ongoing battle over the Berkshire Museum’s quest to deaccession. Attorney General Maura Healey (AGO) filed a request to push the AGO status report deadline to February 5, 2018.  And the “Defendant- Apellant, Berkshire Museum, does not oppose.” 

“Unopposed Motion for Extension of Deadlines
The Substituted Plaintiff-Appellant Attorney General Maura Healey (“AGO”) hereby requests a one week extension of the deadlines set by this Court on  January 12, 2018, such that the preliminary injunction and stay of the trial court proceedings entered on
11/10/17, as well as the AGO’s deadline for filing a status report regarding the status of the investigation, are continued to February 5, 2018. Counsel for Defendant-Appellant Trustees of the Berkshire Museum has informed the undersigned that Defendant-Appellant does not oppose the relief sought herein.” – Respectfully submitted, Dated: January 29, 2018

MA Appelate Court dockets RE#28: The preliminary injunction and stay of the trial court proceedings entered on 11/10/17 are continued to January 29, 2018. The Attorney General’s Office shall file a status report on, or before, January 29, 2018, regarding the status of the investigation or within 5 days of the completion of the investigation, whichever is earliest. (Trainor, J.) *Notice/attest/Agostini, J. – Dated: January 12, 2018 

coming home to sunset and nice news

Thanks Tim McCarthy, Cape Ann Beacon, for this big reminder about the Cape Ann Reads celebration tomorrow, noon to four. Gloucester City Hall is set up and ready for dozens of area artists and writers and their original children’s picture books!

CAPE ANN BEACON Jan 26 2018 CAPE ANN READS _20180126_164102

« Older Entries