Category Archives: Art

Piping Plover fans: Local author Deborah Cramer on sandpipers is a must read. Oh, and Dogs vs.

Gloucester. Page one. Paragraph one.

From Deborah Cramer’s exceptional book, The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and Epic Journey:

“I used to go down to the edge of the creek near my home in Gloucester, Massachusetts, to look for spawning horseshoe crabs, their unfailing arrival sign that a hard winter was turning to spring. There were never very many; at most I’d find six or eight…”

“At the turn of the 19th century, hunters shot at least 5 million ibis, heron, and snowy, reddish and great egrets every year, taking their beautiful cascading plumage to adorn the hats of fashionable women. The nation’s first Audubon societies, the American Ornithological Union, and legislation prohibiting the hunting of migratory birds were born from this excess. Aristocratic Boston socialite Harriet Lawrence Hemenway found the carnage appalling. Over tea with her cousin Minna B. Hall, these mothers of conservation, poring over the Boston Blue Book with its list of Boston’s elite, enlisted 900 women of wealth and power to boycott feathered hats and formed the Massachusetts Audubon Society. The gorgeous birds are still with us.  Often, on an early autumn day, when the marsh by my home is turning a golden yellow and the air and water are still warm, I paddle by 20, 30, sometimes 50 or 60 or even 100 snowy egrets standing in the golden grass. Their absence now would leave a quieter, sadder landscape.” (p.26)

20160629_064719
The tugging your heart set-up:

Among them were a few thousand russet-colored sandpipers, red knots. They raced along the shore, frantically grabbing scattered horseshoe eggs. Where had the knots come from that they were so desperately hungry? And how could a diet of tiny eggs, each the size of a pinhead, take them where they were going? They wasted no time: they’d flown more than 7,500 miles to get here, and in two weeks, they’d be flying 2000 more. And that was only half their journey…” p.2

On birds vs. people, joggers, dogs

“Nearby in Rio Grande, Argentina, where Harrington and Morrison found their largest concentration of knots more than 35 years ago, the birds are disappearing. By 2012 only 300 remained—a staggering loss of 94 percent. Rio Grande, growing out toward the sea and the edges of the Rio Grande River, crowded out the birds, leaving them fewer places to roost. They feed amid congestion, constantly interrupted by the commotion of off-road vehicles, dogs and people. Forced to take flight repeatedly, they lose precious refueling time. Minutes lost during one ebb tide on one day accumulate into hour upon hour as the season continues. So many times I’d walk the beaches at home, unconsciously flushing flocks of sandpipers at the tide line, taking pleasure as they circled out over the water and then landed farther down the beach, never thinking that disturbing them might make a difference.” Guilty.

New Jersey being nice:

One of the greatest challenges for knots is on their home ground. Niles began his career working for the State of New Jersey, helping acquire land to protect shorebirds. Today, long stretches of New Jersey bay beaches and wetlands are protected wildlife refuges. In the spring, the state closes most bay beaches for a few weeks when horseshoe crabs are spawning and shorebirds are feeding. ATVs, dogs, and throngs of bathers frighten the birds, who don’t always return and then can’t find the food they need. Before shorebirds arrive and after they depart, the beaches are open, but during May and early June, tape is strung across the entrances. Signs explain why. I have to admit that after driving to three closed beaches and wistfully gazing at long stretches of sand I couldn’t walk, I was tempted to duck under the tape. Instead, I accompanied a  couple of local anglers who, like me, were making their way up the coast looking for a beach. They were hoping to catch mullet for lunch. Longtime residents, they understood and accepted the closures. A 2013 study of compliance at New Jersey beach closures found that most people cooperate with and support them, with cooperation lowest among some joggers and dog walkers, who proceeded onto the beach anyway.” (p.80)

Don’t miss Kim Smith’s gorgeous Piping Plover Good Harbor Beach coverage. We’ve gone many mornings  with binoculars and cameras. Don’t bother–nothing matches her series! I’ll add in links.

https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2016/06/19/dog-owner-trouble-at-good-harbor-beach-why-it-is-not-a-good-idea-to-ignore-federal-laws/

https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2016/05/23/first-look-beautiful-good-harbor-beach-piping-plovers/

 

Announcement for the novel, “In the Shadow of Light”

ClaireAlemian-1 - Copy

Author Claire (Tebo) Alemian, formerly from Gloucester, will release her new novel, “In the Shadow of Light” on June 27th.  “In the Shadow of Light” takes place in Gloucester during 1960s.

The story is told through the eyes of Ramona Newton as she looks back from midlife on her early years. By the time Ramona is fifteen, her mother has walked out, her father soon to follow, and she ends up at a place called the Far East, tending bar for Charlie Big and hustling pool to survive. The story reveals the period’s clash of generations and class divides, as well as the struggle for civil rights and the turmoil created by the Vietnam War.

Ultimately, it is a story about a woman in search of her true self and asks the question: Who do you become when everything that has meant the most to you is taken away? Readers entering Ramona’s world will travel alongside a young woman who is challenged, spirited and resilient, and who fights for survival against all odds while searching for the truth.

The novel may be purchased at the author’s website www.clairealemian.com as well as Amazon.com (hardcover & Kindle), Barnes & Noble (Nook only – search Claire Alemian In the Shadow of Light). Available at Apple iBooks within a week.

Claire will sign all hardcover orders that come in through her website or through Amazon.com

 

In the Shadow of Light

Gloucester Motif Monday: Lessons On the Water

Scenic spots for Gloucester’s beach swim lessons, part 1.

11:00am

20160627_130354

plum cove-001.jpg

From Jeremy Nestor at the YMCA:

“Beach Swim lessons are offered at Niles Beach on Tuesdays and Plum Cove on Thursdays starting July 5th. The free to member classes give children the tools they need to be safe at the beaches this summer! If you are not a member do not worry. You can still register for the Beach Swim Lessons for $50. Ages 3-5 at 11:00 am and 6-10 at 11:45 am.”

beach swim lessons

Weekly sailing camp options for kids and adults are available from the City of Gloucester through the Cape Ann YMCA. I will add additional sailing options in a separate post.

From Jeremy Nestor:

“YMCA Sailing Camp is a great way to experience all the scenic views Gloucester has to offer from a boat. Kids will learn the essential to sailing and build skills to last them a lifetime. The Cape Ann YMCA partnered with the City of Gloucester to run this recreational sailing program. We also offer adult sailing lessons on Tuesday and Thursday evenings because you don’t have to be a kid to learn the fun of sailing!”

sailing camp 2016 flyer

HarborWalk Summer Cinema Poster

FREE movies on the jumbo screen hosted by the City of Gloucester through Cape Ann Community Cinema and thanks to three premier sponsors: Cape Ann Savings Bank, North Shore Community College and North Shore 104.9.

Individual movie nights are paired up with the support from these local businesses– some are repeat sponsors!

Grease will be shown with support from First Ipswich Bank and Doyon’s;

Finding Nemo is presented by Open Door;

Minions will be shown thanks to Toodeloos!;

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is presented by the Building Center;

and Inside Out from the Manchester Athletic Club.

Movies start July 13th!

http://www.ghwalk.org

20160627_140659

The Late Paul Frontiero Paintings for Sale

DSCN1071 DSCN1078 DSCN1091

The Late Paul Frontiero Paintings for Sale

I’ve received emails regarding my Dad’s Paintings and if they are for sale. Now that the weather is better I will be able to show them to anyone interested in purchasing. I have many left that are just sitting in the storage unit not being enjoyed. There are just so many that can hang on my walls. The sizes of the paintings range between 5″x7″ and up. The price range is $75.00 and up.

Here are some photos of some of the paintings that are available.
You can contact me by email at: Frontiero@hotmail.com

Frontiero@hotmail.com

 

 

Hidden Fiesta: Greasy Pole selfie

Not walking the greasy pole? No problem. Free self guided walking tour on the HarborWalk from your phone includes interactive photo ops. Pose at various prompts and pictures are sent to your phone.

IMG_4302

IMG_0531

Group pose like this one where you and your friends can help carry the statue of St. Peter.

You can share your photos with gharborwalk@gmail.com

IMG_0540

Can you find Fiesta and the greasy pole? Birdseye view

20160622_193532-001

Clarence Birdseye had the perfect name!

Enjoy a birds-eye vista of Gloucester. The Fiesta at St. Peter’s is to the left of the new Beauport Hotel, the former site of Birdseye, and the Greasy Pole to the right. Finding Fiesta from the next birds-eye vantage point is a challenge, but if you have keen eyes…

20160622_192424

Look in this direction.

20160622_192404-001

Cape Ann Big Band jaw dropping O’Maley fundraiser

On June 17th, the last day of school, the classic 17 piece Cape Ann Big Band hosted a Spring/Summer Concert at the O’Maley Middle School, A Swing Extravaganza. Listen to some of the songs in the clip below! The band was formed in 2010. The band leader for this super professional, top-notch, sought after band is Carlos Menezes Jr. He just happens to be  the director of the O’Maley music department! Our students have access to astonishing and creative visual arts, performance,and music teachers.  The members of the Cape Ann Big Band, Gloucester Education Foundation, O’Maley Band Parent Organization, Captain Hooks, Supinos, Paula Burns, and others are making this music happen to inspire the kids in our community.”80% of all ticket sales went to help fund new instruments and band room renovations at the Middle School.” Plus Cape Ann Big Band announced during the concert that they are donating those sweet stands to the music department.

Just sayin’-  You can book the Cape Ann Big Band. http://www.cabbswings.com

Here’s two minutes of video snippets including classics Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy and ‘S Wonderful with vocalist Katy Geraghty. You’ll hear a huge round of applause for Carlos Menezes Jr solo, and stunning vocals from Kate Barry, Scott Parisi and Nathan Seavey. I loved the rendition of “Me and Mrs. Jones”  the 1972 song by Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, and Cary Gilbert. My phone battery died so I didn’t grab from that song. I also missed the O’Maley Jazz ensemble who played a big set of 10 songs with many solos. They were incredible. Next time you hear that the school band or Cape Ann Big Band are playing a gig make it a point to see them.

20160617_191115

The true one and only ‘Cat’ in Gloucester, Cat Barbagallo with the Sayess family, other parents and GEF helping out with fundraising.

20160617_191037-001

20160617_191032-001

 

Overland cycles Essex Coastal Scenic Byway,Gloucester, Cape Ann

Overland employees from across the country  cycle together for a summer leadership trip. Looks like a great group. Overland is based in Williamstown, and cycling started in Salisbury. They camped at Cape Ann Camp Site (see where to stay Gloucester). Photo op at Wolf Hill while they had a quick water break.

from their website: “Overland offers adventurous summer experiences worldwide for 4th to 12th graders”

Happy travels! Thanks for riding in Gloucester! 20160622_103912.jpg

 

Pauline Bresnahan goes to the State House: Watch it live 1pm

Pauline

Congratulations, Pauline! She is one of the inspiring women to be honored today at the State House in the 13th Annual Unsung Heroines Award from the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women. Gloucester can watch it live on app Periscope at 1pm! This will be the first time the Unsung Heroines event is livestreaming, and the first time Pauline has been inside the State House.  

Open the Periscope app in your phone or tablet. Search for “MassCSW” 1pm live feed.

 

Boston Globe on Beauport, Biotech, Windover

“Fishing is going to be our heritage and first priority,” Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken said. But she added, “We’re moving forward.”

Kathleen Conti describes Gloucester Biotechnology Academy and Beauport Hotel as meaningful catalysts. In addition to the Mayor’s quote, there are comments  and points of view shared by several: Sherri Zizik; Vito Giacalone; Gregory Verdine; Ken Riehl, Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce (nice quote); Lee Dellicker, Winhover Construction (Beauport); George Marsh (architect Gloucester Biotechnology). Oh, and the former Mayor of New Bedford, John Bullard. chimes in.

Other new businesses downtown beyond this article include goodlinens opening July 1, Jane Deering Gallery on Pleasant Street, the new bicycle rental shop, and Tonno restaurant. And there’s a new gallery coming to Rocky Neck. More on that later!

 

boston globe jun 21 2016001

Read more

What if you welcome the morning like this surfer?

20160523_052219

 

20160523_052203

They paddled beyond the breaking waves to stop and watch the sunrise.

Surf and awe (technically known as rapid peace- is a  lifestyle doctrine based on the use of overwhelming power of appreciation, and spectacular displays of force and beauty in nature)

Motif Monday.

Art of fatherhood: Gloucester artists and writers

A small selection of images and words about and by fathers, with Gloucester ties. What would you add? Happy Father’s Day!

Edward Hopper portrait of artist's father

Edward Hopper, portrait of artist’s father, Whitney Museum

 

Air

They took my father’s father from the mines

and laid him, broken, on the kitchen table,

the wake singers lifting their lines

above the water heater he had often mended.

 

My father always dreamed of him alive,

able to whittle an oak peg for every split thing.

all my father lost at the age of nine

enclosed his life, his air.

 

In my flood dream, I carry my father

piggyback–easier than a kid’s coffin–

to safety from the Susquehanna River

as light as a dollhouse, now, or violin.

Joseph Featherstone, from his book of poems, Brace’s Cove

 

Gloucester, Massachusetts. Anthony Parisi, an Italian fisherman's son

Gordon Parks, “Gloucester, Massachusetts. Anthony Parisi, an Italian fisherman’s son.” Library of Congress, FSA collection

 

Caitlin

To be seven when a brother dies–

to have shared a room.

Her silence frightened us.

 

One night she rose from the table

and climbed to the top of the stairs.

We heard the small voice

 

singing each of the songs

from the funeral service.

The next morning in school

 

she announced to her class,

“I am ready for questions now.”

by Joseph Featherstone, from Brace’s Cove

 

Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father's home, part of the tri-annual fiesta of Pentacost. The celebration--including the chosing of an Imperator, and

Gordon Parks, “Gloucester, MA. Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father’s home…” Library of Congress

full title for the Gordon Parks photograph above: “Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father’s home, part of the tri-annual fiesta of Pentacost. The celebration–including the chosing of an Imperator, and visiting, eating, drinking, and worship in the home, culminates in a parade and blessing by the priest–originated with ancient Portugeese fisherman, drought-stricken, who prayed for assistance and received it.”

 

John_hays_hammond_and_natalie_hays_hammond library of congress

John Hays Hammond with daughter, Natalie Hays Hammond. collection Library of Congress

Captain’s Courageous was published in 1897. “During the winter of 1897-98 I made another trip to South Africa, and on the same boat with me were Rudyard Kipling (Rudyard was named after a place where his father and mother first met), his wife, and his father, Lockwood Kipling, the artist. They proved excellent traveling companions and we have maintained our friendly contact ever sense.” – John Hays Hammond 

John_Lockwood_Kipling_és_Rudyard_Kipling

John Lockwood Kipling and Rudyard Kipling

The Kiplings collaborated: the artist John Lockwood Kipling illustrated many of his sons’ books.

John Lockwood Kipling Jungle Book

jungle book 2

John Lockwood Kipling White Seal

John Lockwood Kipling, The White Seal

 

William Foster Biddle Cecilia Beaux PAFA gift of Sandwith Drinker

Cecilia Beaux, portrait sketch of William Foster Biddle, Pennsylvania Academy Fine Art, gift of Sandwith Drinker  (Biddle like a father to Cecilia)

 

William Morris Hunt Prodigal Son Brattleboro library

William Morris Hunt, Prodigal Son, Brattleboro Library

Hunt purchased a former barn and adjoining carpenter’s shop in Magnolia. “…in three weeks the old, unsightly buildings were converted into a picturesque structure with galleries on the outside, one of them ending in a seat in an old willow-tree. The carpenter shop was turned into a studio, the chief light coming from the wide-open door…The barn was two stories in height, the lower portion being occupied by the van, a phaeton and a dog-cart, as well as by stalls for two or three horses. The upper room was known as the “barracks”, and half a dozen cot-beds were arranged around the sides, as seats by day and beds by night…In a single afternoon his celebrated Gloucester Harbor was painted, and he returned to Magnolia aglow with enthusiasm. “I believe,” he exclaimed, “that I have painted a picture with light in it!…Go out into the sunshine, and try to get some of its color and light. Then come back here, and see how black we are all painting!”

William Morris Hunt Gloucester Harbor MFA 1877

William Morris Hunt, Gloucester Harbor, 1877, MFA Boston

 

sargent house museum john singer sargent portrait of father.jpg

John Singer Sargent portrait of the artist’s father, Sargent House Museum

 

Paul Manship and family Isabel Manship xSarah Janet x Elizabeth x Pauline x John Paul x Paul

Family portrait: Isabel Manship, Sara Janet, Elizabeth, Pauline, John Paul, Paul Manship

 

lee kingman natti002-001

Lee Kingman, Peter’s Pony, 1963, with illustrations by Fen Lasell

 

Leon Doucette

Leon Doucette, portrait of the artist’s father

 

Milton Avery March drypoint 1933

Milton Avery 1933 drypoint (March, his daughter)

 

Winslow Homer captures the waiting and watching experienced by so many families in Gloucester. Homer’s father, Charles Savage Homer, left for extended start-ups: to California for gold, to Europe.  Winslow Homer’s mother was a professional and gifted artist who raised three stellar boys solo, a lot. The Homer family remained tight knit.

Dad's Coming, 1873, NGA

Winslow Homer, Dad’s Coming, 1873,  National Gallery of Art

 

Friday Nights at the A&P

By Ruthanne “Rufus”  Collinson

When I was a kid

there were Friday nights to get lost in.

There was Mama

to take me shopping,

the smell of outdoors on her wool coat.

There was the A&P on Main Street,

the long spread out time

to wander the rolling floors

and smell the oranges and the coffee grinding.

There was no talking with Mama and me

She chose the food and I thought,

the long time of thinking away from Mama

in the A&P.

I watched the women

with heavy faces and deep frowns

weighing out their fruits

I thought about how bad they looked,

but I knew they didn’t want to die

because of the way they cared

about stacking the apples.

Sometimes I lost Mama and her sadness

but she would find me and take me

to the check out

where I picked up Daddy’s Pall Malls

and then stayed close to her wide sleeve

as we carried our lumpy brown bags

past Paul T. Reddy’s Dancing School.

I heard people dancing upstairs

Shadows in the window suggested music

and the end of time laid out like that.

wp-1465081378862

Gloucester street art is an all star

Worcester, the host city for the Ma Smart Growth Conference, is Massachusetts’ second largest city and pretty pumped with a 500 million investment in their ‘city square’ area. The city invested 8 million dollars into their ‘streetscapes’, including a skating rink. “10,000 came out for themed skate nights!” I’ve heard skating rink wishes mentioned once or twice in Gloucester: discussions pro I4C2 or somewhere on Middle Street (“a scene nearly Currier and Ives!”) and why isn’t the O’Maley skating rink used by the students? “We used to use it for gym? It’s an amenity right there.”

Other conference talks focused on investment in public space and public health. Worcester aims to earn the distinction Healthiest Community in MA by 2020. They have the first and only accredited public health department so they’re investing in a core culture.  The conference speakers spoke about housing, planning, walk-ability, return of multi-generational family households, and diversity. Millennials say: “Where do I want to live?” and then go. Their parents’ said “Where is the job?” and relocated. We were told many times that millennials are different than boomers: they don’t like traditional offices and buildings for work. They would rather walk, bike or commute by train. Ideally their life radius would fall within one mile, a neighborhood scale. How does that affect consolidating schools vs neighborhood schools and other debates ensued.

From a planning perspective: “Does the investment action help to encourage sprawl or does it invest in your community?”

 

20160602_100053

The session “Is Housing a Municipal Budget Buster” was led by Mayor Donna Holaday of Newburyport and panelists included former Gov. Glendening and Umass Dartmouth Director of Public Policy, Michael Goodman. Most questions went to Mike Hogan, who gave a talk about Oceanspray’s residential venture in Plymouth, Redbrook Village. Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce brought him here to speak to our communities a couple of years ago.  He said to say hi to Peter Webber:).

The second session I attended focused on arts and planning and was led by artist (ceramicist) and planner, Jennifer Erickson with Kenneth Bailey, Design Studio for Social Intervention (D24SI) and others.  A projected slide loop featuring model national art projects scrolled continuously. I was so caught up in the briefs that I nearly missed one picture from Gloucester: the monumental Parsons Street mural by James Owen Calderwood. Congratulations James!

Cruz Ferreras took the photograph during a block party; there’s a Cape Ann Art Haven painting in progress and kids leaping. Since that photo, street lighting and more art was added, a second monumental mural, painted by children, under the direction of Cape Ann Art HavenThe Gloucester Fish Net mural was a temporary commission that is lasting because the road is primarily used for walking. (Also, the artist painted it over a second time, and widened it.) With funding, Cape Ann Art Haven art center  or an individual artist like Jason Burroughs (who assisted James Owen Calderwood) could re-paint the mural. With funding and fresh sealcoating, we could issue a Call for a new work of art. There are several more walls along Parsons Street that could be a wonderful matrix for murals, or the streetscape for a dance or theater production. 

20160602_140623

20160602_142225

20160602_135656

20160602_135850

Google street view FISH NET 300 foot street muralIMG_6891

Sneak Peek Thanksgiving Pop Up artist commission

Pauline Bresnahan shares a screenshot–and a Save the Date 11/26/16 Thanksgiving Pop Up @ The Hive

Will you look at that? An original portrait commission because of the 2015 Thanksgiving Pop Up Fair at the Hive where we featured local younger artists! You can find out more about the artists and see examples of their work on the young artist directory of the Hive website. Which reminds me–artists send in your updates!

IMG_3409

Gloucester in the house at North Carolina Museum

A rare Edward Hopper drawing of East Main Street, Gloucester, is part of a comprehensive exhibit, “Marks of Genius”, masterpieces from the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA) on view at the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) through June 19th. These wonders of process traveled to the Grand Rapids Art Museum in Michigan before Raleigh. The next stop will be the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.  The Hopper is featured at every venue, and so is Gloucester. 

If it were your museum, where would you hang the Hopper?  The NCMA installed the drawings in their largest special exhibition space by subject rather than chronologically, the design choice of other venues. How do I know? Exhibitions Assistant, Margaret Gaines, was kind enough to share details and photographs of the museum and its beautiful Meymandi Exhibition Gallery in the East Building so that we could all armchair art gawk. (I smiled when I read that East Main Street is in the East building of this East coast museum.) “Gloucester” is written on the museum label along with my research and color photograph.

“American Impressionist: Childe Hassam and the Isle of Shoals” is up at the same time.  Childe Hassam has Gloucester and Massachusetts ties, but I didn’t ask to see pictures of that exhibit. Though “Marks of Genius”  won’t be coming any closer to Massachusetts than North Carolina, the Hassam show is coming to the Peabody Essex Museum on July 16th. The North Carolina Museum of Art partnered with PEM. I wouldn’t miss it.

NC Museum of Art raleigh estab 1924

DI25547-09DI25547-08my photoHopper detail2

 

Here’s another photograph pulled back to compare the house with the Hopper sketch and choices.

IMG_5960

 

Exh entrances

North Carolina Mus of ArtNCMA_Pond-001

Cemeteries and playgrounds for all the new old open spaces

New playground ideas land at BSA

You may have been reading about Design Museum Boston‘s exhibit because there has been so much advance press and articles about play. The show opened last week at the Boston Society of Architects venue and will be on view all summer. I’m not sold on the term ‘playscapes’ but I’ll definitely see this exhibit. I’m expecting plans and ideas rather than actual playground equipment. There’s a party favor: a playground passport your kids can leave with as they head out to play for real in Boston parks.

A trending topic the show may cover is the idea of opening up all those schoolyard playgrounds for use by the community when the schools aren’t using them– at night, off days and hours. Here’s a recent article making the rounds from the Atlantic Monthly magazine and the trailer from the documentary The Land.

Extraordinary playscapes BSA

A cemetery budget is no walk in the park (and neither is a cemetery)

Swinging wildly through the stages of life: historic cemeteries, ‘gardens with graves’, are inspiring multi use discussion of a different sort. Cemeteries established in the 1800’s were rolling landscapes, beautifully designed to welcome the general public. Massachusetts’ first one:

“Mt. Auburn is more like a park than a crypt. It is 175 acres of winding paths, dignified trees, whispery breezes, and shimmering lakes. The land, called “Stone’s Wood,” used to be beloved by Harvard students as the perfect place to take respite from the bustle of 19th-century life, and the Cemetery was created in 1831 to ensure that the growing cities of Cambridge and Watertown would not envelop the forest’s beauty. The founders were successful in their efforts.” read more from this Harvard Crimson article.

In Gloucester, renewed attention for care in several cemeteries is under way. Sign up for the Oak Grove cemetery tour June 25th or July 2 to learn more about one of our own ‘Mt. Auburns by the sea’. The tours will be led by Courtney Richardson.

20160613_090301

 

 

« Older Entries