Category Archives: All Things Gloucester

SELL OUT WARNING: Roomful of Blues Cruise this SUNDAY

When I lived for a while in the mountains near Woodstock, NY, people there used to say, “We have three seasons: July, August and Winter.”  This spring might make you wonder if the same is true here in Gloucester.  It’s not.  Nice weather is around the corner and it starts this weekend when we celebrate Memorial Day and call it the beginning of summer (even though astronomically, summer isn’t for another 4 weeks).  So … good riddance oh nasty spring — IT’S TIME TO PARTY!

But here’s the thing: even if our capricious New England weather decides not to cooperate, which we all know is possible, you can still party in supreme comfort aboard The Beauport Prince Cruise Ship on Memorial Day Sunday with 5-time Grammy nominees Roomful of Blues!  That’s because the Beauport Princess is a Cruise Ship (not a whale watch boat) sporting 2 climate-controlled indoor decks with dance floors PLUS an open-air top deck — and there’s a full bar on every deck.  For this cruise, we have theatre seating on the first deck, tables on the 2nd deck and couches on the top deck — because Mother Nature could be nice to us after all!  Tickets are only $35 in advance ($45 at the dock if there are any left — this cruise has sold out the last 2 years).  It’s the best Memorial Day bargain you’ll find so get tickets right now RIGHT HERE!

We’re not always right but we’re right about this

Once in a while we pick a winner.  This is one of those times … trust me.  Ruby Rose Fox will be a major Rock Star in the not-too-distant future.

We’ve presented Ruby Rose Fox on stage twice: Opening for Martha Davis + The Motels last April at Beverly’s Larcom Theatre (where Sheila Roberts Orlando took the photo at right) and in a co-bill with Jesse Dee at The Cabot last July (see this review).

In addition to being one of the best singers and songwriters we’ve encountered over the past dozen or so years, Ruby produces extraordinary videos (see them here).

Today she premieres a double feature.  That’s right, folks … 2 videos at once.  See a review by Infectious Magazine here.  Better yet, watch and enjoy, below (top volume and full screen recommended).  You can see Ruby at Katrina’s on June 18th with Gloucester’s own Inge Berge opening (another one of our favorite singer/songwriters/video producers — see some of Inge’s videos here and listen an excellent Inge Berge song below).

Food Fight in Lynn on May 7!

This drama touched nearly all of us, who live in Gloucester.  Now it’s a movie.  Check it out on May 7th at Lynn Auditorium!

FoodFight

Tickets available on line here or by calling the Box Office at 781-599-SHOW or Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.  Or you can go to their box office at 3 City Hall Square in Lynn, MA (Lynn City Hall).

Here’s an article about the film with some good backstory:

We Are All Market Basket
Food Fight: Inside The Battle for Market Basket documentary tells the dramatic story
By Rachel Forrest

For six weeks in the summer of 2014, we watched the result of a modern Greek family drama unfold.  After a long history of conflict and intrigue,  on July 17, 2014, Arthur T. Demoulas, CEO of Market Basket, was ousted from his position by rival and cousin Arthur S. Demoulas, and because this drama is a modern one, we were  in the audience experiencing  not the heated boardroom discussions but the aftermath of that one decision. We watched and read the news stories as thousands of Market Basket workers walked out in protest to demand that their beloved “Artie T.” be reinstated, with the statement “We Are Market Basket.”  Not content to just watch, many of us became part of the protest, and signing petitions, boycotting the stores, honking in encouragement while driving by parking lots filled with strikers.

Food Fight: Inside The Battle for Market Basket, which premiered at the Boston International Film Festival on April 15, is the story of six weeks in the life of the largest non-union walk-out in U.S.History. Filmmaker Jay Childs and his crew were on the ground filming as soon as the story broke and with Producer Melissa Paly and Tom Bennett, Tom Bennett, Producer, Editor and Writer. They tell the saga of the walk-out and aftermath through on the scene footage, in-depth interviews with the key organizers and everyday Market Basket employees, revealing insider-only communiques and interviews with industry experts. The result is a film filled with drama and emotion — hope, anger, fear — but  most of all, it’s a story about the courage of just regular, hard working people and what they sacrificed to save the company that treated them — 25,000 employees — so well.

The film begins with a bit of background into the rise of Market Basket, the old Greek family and offspring that brought the franchise to success from one small store  in Lowell, MA, in 1917. You’ll learn about the beginning of the controversies in 1990, family infighting, lawsuits and court battles, but the bulk of the film is about the people who work there. Told chronologically which both helps keep the story flowing and heighten the real-life dramatic tension, we meet managers who have been with the company all of their working lives, since age 16, for 40 years and more. We hear the stories of truck drivers and bagboys, teenagers and seniors. They tell us why they love “Artie T.”, all he’s done for them and why, as a result, they want to help bring him back.

Thanks to the filmmakers’ dogged dedication to being right there among the organizers during the strike, we’re party to scenes and plot twists missed in some media coverage. We learn about how the strike affects the families, how the cause took precedent over paying the bills. We also meet key organizers, including Steve Paulenka and Tom Trainor, both during the strike and afterward in revealing interviews in which they explain what is is about the company culture that created a staff who would sacrifice this much to get their leader back. We hear them say “The company gives a little more to me than I’ve given them.” “Artie built this place.” “We don’t mind working hard because of who we work for.” “We can be a part of something greater.”

We also learn about the effects our own actions had on the stores. Many of us were a part of the massive customer boycott of the stores and saw the empty shelves on the news but what you might not know is all of the intrigue that went on during that boycott when some workers still in the stores participated in the resistance with slow-downs and civil disobedience tactics as well as  defiant memos to the reigning leadership, all part of an organized grassroots strategy by 6-8 key people who met each day.

The film follows it all through buyout attempts and lay offs to the dramatic conclusion then follows up with interviews that reflect how we all felt when we heard the news on August 27, 2014 that Artie T. had been reinstated. We don’t hear from Arthur S.,  Felicia Thornton or Jim Gooch, the co-CEOs  during the takeover. We don’t hear from Artie T.  until a speech at the end of the film,  but this story isn’t really about them. Food Fight: Inside The Battle for Market Basket takes us out of the boardroom and talk of money and power and into the lives of regular, hard working,  loyal people — the Market Basket employees –who with all the customers who supported the cause, stood up for what was right, what they believed in, and won. This gripping, touching and inspiring documentary tells us how and why they did just that.

Homie and Rubber Duck’s Fifth Anniversary

Five years since Rubber Duck and Homie met on that blustery day April 18, 2011. The Fifth is the wood anniversary. Homie gave Rubber Duck a carving of Homie. (Homie is a little self-centered.)

Homie would have carved it himself but he has no opposable thumbs.

Homie would have carved it himself but he has no opposable thumbs.

The following is a repost of Homie and Rubber Duck’s First Anniversary describing that fateful hook-up five years ago today.

Homie: “You’re not from around here are you? May I show you the cove?”

Solitude of the lonely Homie.

Cold, lonely, rubbery, but Patriotic!

A little stand offish at first.

They’re eyes locked and Homie was in love.

“So how many children should we have?” Homie wasn’t wasting any time.

“I have a lovely nest on Milk Island.”

You’re not listening to a word I’m saying!”

“We could make it work!”

“Do you think it’s safe to come out?”

Your friends are rude Homie.

Rubber Duck out on the Town at another Fred Bodin Christmas party.

I cannot believe it has only been one year since the Rubber Duck met Homie on a blustery day just like today, April 18, 2011. When I posted that first part of the Rubber Duck saga I was only joking about it being a twenty part series. Little did I know that maybe a hundred posts later the story is still not finished. To commemorate their anniversary I repost the first few chapters. Later this week will be an update of how Homie and Rubber Duck spent their day today. Part I posted April 18th, 2011:  (This will be a twenty part series.) Part II posted April 19th, 2011: But first, the back story. Two lonely birds:  But soon the connection was made and time stopped. ”  “I am so out of here!”  But Homie came back of course and took Rubber Duck all over. The Rockport Dump, Thacher Island lighthouse, Maine, Florida, meeting Santa when he arrived in Rockport, wine tasting at Passports, Duck Confit at Duckworth’s. Then, just a few months later, things got a little weird: Last sighting of RD was at the Spring Fling two weeks ago with rumors that she was at the Thirsty Golf contest at the DogBar last week when Joey caught her again staring at him.  Flexilis anatidaephobia is the fear that a rubber duck is staring at you and Joey has got it bad.

Rose Sheehan and Colin de la Barre Sing Songs of Spring at Gloucester’s U.U. Church SAT, April 16

Rose and COLIN Spring Sing 2016 brighter

Rose Sheehan and Colin de la Barre Sing Songs of Spring at the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church Saturday, April 16 at 7:00 PM

Mother and son acapella duo Rose Sheehan and Colin de la Barre of Gloucester, MA will sing traditional and traditionally inspired songs of the British Isles and North America in celebration of Spring on Saturday, April 16, 2016 from 7:00 to 9:00 PM in the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church vestry. Entrance is at 10 Church Street. Admission is $10 at the door.

Rose Sheehan, a life-long native of Massachusetts, grew up enjoying music of all genres, happily singing in church and school choirs.  At age 19, she was introduced to the world of traditional music and dance and was smitten with the sound.  After settling in Boston, she formed a musical duo with Bob Doucet. They performed throughout the Northeast region at coffeehouses and small taverns including the Nameless Coffeehouse, Cambridge, the Pressroom, NH, the Thirsty Whale, ME and at Toronto’s Fiddler’s Green.

Following that partnership, Rose became a dance musician for Morris Dance, an English ritual dance form. She was soon attending dance events where she learned songs from John Roberts and Tony Barrand, Ian Robb and others.  She studied vocal technique with Anabel Graetz and Frankie Armstrong.  John Langstaff cast Rose as a solo vocalist in a production of the Spring Revels.

Eventually Rose moved to the Greenfield area and started a family.  Her musical interests became community oriented.  She founded two participatory events: Montague May Celebration and Welcome Yule! A Midwinter Celebration.  Both events have run for over 30 years and continue to be presented annually, involving hundreds of participants of all ages in song and dance.  During that time, Rose sang in a small vocal ensemble directed by Susan Waters alongside Rani Arbo of Salamander Crossing.

Colin de la Barre grew up in western Massachusetts in a musical household, attending his first musical event at age two months.  When asked, Colin says he began singing with his mom in his late teens.  Rose asserts that they’ve been “singing together since before he was born!”

Colin demonstrated his talent for music and rhythm as a very young child, dancing before he could speak.  He played fiddle during his middle childhood years, easily picking up tunes by ear.  He performed annually in the children’s chorus of Welcome Yule! and sang in school choruses.  One day he started singing along with his parents in harmony and soon began making performance appearances with them at venues including the Mystic Sea Music Festival and the Portsmouth Maritime Folk Festival.

As a duo, Rose and Colin are especially known for their inspired harmonies and rich blend of familial voices.

They have led workshops and presented concerts for the Folklore Society of Greater Washington and once paired with Ann Mayo Muir and her daughter Christina Muir to co-lead a harmony singing workshop.  They have performed at the Indian Neck Folk Festival, the New England Folk Festival and at local north shore coffeehouses. In 2014 they were selected as juried showcase performers for the North East Regional Folk Alliance Conference in Kerhonkson, NY.

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