Author Archives: Kim Smith

LIVE MAVIS STAPLES and the FABULOUS RICK HOLMSTROM BAND at the Shalin Liu

Rockin steady in Rockport with Mavis Staples and her fabulously talented backup trio, the Rick Holmstrom Band.

 

Live Mavis Staples Rockin Rockport at the Shalin Liu with fabulous LA trio Rick Holmstrom Band!

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

 

This was a show not to be missed and according to several of the production team members, was one of the best they’ve ever produced at the Shalin Liu. I couldn’t agree more! Rick Holmstrom on guitar, Jeff Turmes, on bass, and Stephen Hodges on drums. Bring back Mavis and the Rick Holmstrom Band-an extraordinary group of talented musicians.

 

 

You can see Mavis, along with her father Pop Staples and siblings, the Staple Singers, come in at around one minute. The song was included in the film The Last Waltz (directed by Martin Scorsese), a documentary about The Band’s last concert. 

 

 

Rockin Mavis Staples and Rick Holmstrom Band performing The Weight by The Band

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

 

 

Let the Voting Begin!

The FINALISTS for the “Winter on Cape Ann” Video Contest have been chosen!

 

Gloucester, MA – Cape Ann TV (www.capeanntv.org ), a non-profit local access cable station serving Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester-by-the-sea, and Essex, invites the residents of Cape Ann to choose the winner of the first “Winter on Cape Ann” Video Contest.  Below are links to the video finalists. 

Video 1

 

 

Video 2

To cast your vote please send an email to contest@capeanntv.org with your selection in the subject line (Video 1 or Video 2). Only one vote per email address will count. 

Voting polls are open and will close by midnight on Sunday, February 22nd, 2015.

The winner will be announced on Monday, February 23rd on http://www.capeanntv.org, Cape Ann TV’s Facebook page, and Cape Ann TV’s Twitter page @CapeAnnTVCATV.

Congratulations to our finalists and thank you to everyone who participated!

Shout Out to Addison Gilbert Hospital (Edited)

53949368_127714376795Thanks so much to the incredible emergency room staff at the Addison Gilbert Hospital.

Tuesday morning after my pleasant shopping break at Alexandra’s Bread, I crashed on the ice. It was bound to happen and ever since breaking my back in a harrowing fall when I was nine months pregnant, I live in mortal fear of ice. After waiting a day to see if the swelling around my ankle would subside, which it did not, I found this very handy link called the Ottawa Ankle Rules. The test is not used to ascertain if your ankle is broken or sprained, but is a practical guide to determine whether or not an X-ray is needed.

From the receptionist, to the X-ray technicians, to Doctor Soderman, everyone was kind, courteous, and compassionate. A special thanks to my assigned nurse Eileen. I am sorry I did not learn her last name, but she lives in Rockport, and when I inquired as to how long she had been working at AGH, she said so many years, she had lost track!

To say we are so very fortunate to have AGH in our community is an understatement. While mine was a very minor injury, I recalled the last time we were there at the emergency room, which was when my then nine-year-old son Alex went down the hill that is our street, Plum Street, at 90 miles per hour on his bike. He careened off the road and planted his head on the neighbor’s stone wall. The ambulance driver said had he not been wearing his helmet, which was cracked in a half dozen places, he would most likely not have survived. Alex was rushed to AGH where he received outstanding care. I will never forget how kind the nurses were during that traumatic event.

Thanks again to the dedicated and compassionate staff at the Addison Gilbert Hospital, for the care our son received at that time and, broadly speaking, for all that they do to keep our community alive and well. And thank you to everyone who has worked so hard to help keep the Addison Gilbert Hospital doors open.

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(EDIT) Great message from GMG Reader Jane Southworth, an RN and former Gloucester resident, now living in Southport, ME, where their local hospital was shut down.

Jane writes ~

“The Cape Ann community is really fortunate. I grew up in Magnolia and have lived in Southport, Maine for many years. Our community is much like Gloucester. Southport is a small community of 500 year around residents. Boothbay Harbor is a fishing community and has a strong relationship with Gloucester. The big difference is that we lost our wonderful St. Andrews Hospital two years ago after a fierce battle with the Maine Health Organization. We are located 18 miles down a peninsular from route 1 which leads to two other hospitals, each another 18 + miles depending on whether you wanted to go south or N.East. We have been left with an 8 hour Urgent Care Center. We are primarily an elderly community which says a lot for access to 24 hour emergency care especially in weather like we’ve had this winter. In the summer months this is a big tourist area similar to Gloucester. Fight for your hospital and don’t let the big guns (CEO’s and lawyers) knock you down. AGH is a great Hospital.”

Jane Southworth, RN

Portrait Addison Gilbert Gloucester

Who was Addison Gilbert (1808 -1888)?

Addison Gilbert was the founder of the Addison Gilbert Hospital and the Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons. He was a merchant, banker, and politician. Gilbert served many terms as a Gloucester selectman as well as in the Massachusetts legislature. He also served as town moderator and auditor. Gilbert was one of the founders of the Cape Ann Savings Bank. Addison Gilbert is buried at the Oak Grove Cemetery on Washington Street. Information and portrait of Addison Gilbert found on the web from Kenneth Gilbert.

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Did You Know That ANYONE Can Become A Member of the Audubon Society?

In case you were unaware, The Audubon Society is not a restricted organization. It is comprised entirely of people like you and me. Massachusetts alone has over 100,000 member citizens that belong to the Massachusetts Audubon Society. Here is a link to get you started: Get Involved.

Particularly for Massachusetts residents, the Massachusetts Audubon Society’s website is especially helpful in identifying birds observed locally; see the Massachusetts Breeding Bird Atlas Find a Bird Page. The Common Eider seen on Rogers Street, and guided to safety by Thomas Donahue, is on the Mass Audubon Find A Bird page and you can read more about this interesting bird here: Common Eider.The atlas isn’t always helpful, for example, GMG contributor Donna recently spotted a Horned Grebe. That particular species is not included on the page however, it was easily identified by looking at other sources, including books and websites such as Cornell’s All About Birds website.

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Reminder: Cape Ann Winter Birding Weekend, a program sponsored by the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce in conjunction with the Massachusetts Audubon Society was rescheduled for the weekend of February 27 through the 29th. Click here for details.

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Robert Chem Sanderlings painting currently on view at the Trident Gallery

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Robert Chem Northern Shrike 

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Additional information about Mass Audubon membership:

Members of the Massachusetts Audubon Society enjoy the following benefits:

Free Places to Explore, a full-color guide to Mass Audubon’s wildlife sanctuaries, nature centers, and museums.

Free one-year subscriptions to Connections, our member newsletter, and our new annual publication (first issue will be sent in February).

Member-only discounts on hundreds of exciting programs, camps, courses, and most special events.

Savings on purchases and access to member-only sales at our gift shops.

Member-only access to:

Savings on green auto insurance (10%) with the Environmental Insurance Agency (EIA).

Migrate to Explorer level or higher for even more benefits. Learn about our different membership levels.

Check out our Frequently Asked Questions or contact us.

IMPORTANT STORM TRASH INFORMATION CORRECTION UPDATE FROM COUNCILOR PAUL MCGEARY

unnamedSnowstorm update CORRECTION

Follow-up trash and recycling pickup today (Wednesday)

Dear Friends:

My apologies, because this is a holiday week, trash/recycle pickup is one day later than normal. Below is the plan for trash/recycling for the rest of the week:

If your normal pickup day is Monday or Tuesday, bring your trash and recycling to curbside today (Wednesday).

If your normal pickup day is Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, please put your trash out one day later than your normal pickup day.

If you are desperate to get rid of your recycling, you can bring it to the Hiltz Recycling Center at 24 Kondelin Road. Note that only recyclables can be brought to this location–not trash.

If it gets to be late in the day and no one has arrived yet, call the DPW at 978-281-9785

   For more information

Updates will be forthcoming as the storm progresses. Please check the City of Gloucester website for further updates at www.gloucester-ma.gov

GIFT SHOPPING AT ALEXANDRA’S BREAD and FYI, PARKING IS A BREEZE ON MAIN STREET!

Alexandra's Bread ©Kim Smith 2015 -1 Needing a gift for a friend who loves to bake, I stopped by Alexandra’s Bread this morning. Thanks to our hard working DPW, I just pulled right into the parking space, easy, peasy! A blast of scents, yummy fresh-baked bread and cranberry scones greeted me, along with an equally as wonderful blast of color in their fun gifts and wonderful handmade treasures. Alexandra’s Bread is the perfect anecdote to yet another snowy day! While shopping, you can also stock up on their fabulous and fresh baguettes, olive bread, and scones.

Alexandra's Bread ©Kim Smith 2015 -3

Alexandra's Bread ©Kim Smith 2015 -5

Alexandra and Kirsten ©Kim Smith 2015

See more treasures here ~ Read more

Carolina Wren

For the past several years a pair of the sweetest Carolina Wrens have made our garden their home. The wrens are at the very edge of their northern range and because of that, they are much more at risk than many of the species of birds that we see at our feeders. Knowing this is one of the reasons why we are so vigilant in keeping the bird feeders well-stocked. The Carolina Wrens are easy to please; safflower seeds and suet are amongst their favorites. The following I wrote awhile back but because they are so vulnerable in this snowiest of winters, I think the information is worthwhile to repost.

Carolina Wren Thryothorus ludovicianusCarolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)

Come-to-me, come-to-me, come-to-me, repeated from sun up to sundown. Mellow and sweet—though loud enough to attract my attention—what was this new-to-my-ears birdsong coming from the thicket of shrubs? Occasionally we would catch a quicksilver glimpse of a petite sparrow-sized songbird singing energetically atop the fence wall or rapidly pecking at the chinks of bark on our aged pear tree. But this was definitely not a sparrow. His is a rounded little body with tail held upward. He has pale orangey-buff underparts and rich russet plumage, with white and black barred accents on the wings, and long white eye-stripes. Because his coloring is so similar to, my husband took to calling it “that chipmunk bird.”

After much running to the window and out the back door at his first few notes I was able to identify our resident Carolina Wren. All summer long and through the fall we were treated to his beautiful and sundry melodies. Here it is late winter and he is again calling me to the window. We can have a longer look through bare trees and shrubs. Much to our joy there is not one wren, but a pair!

The Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) is common throughout the southeast; so populous it is the state bird of South Carolina. When found on Cape Ann it is at its most northern edge of its territory. Gradually, as the climate has warmed over the past century, its range has expanded. They are sensitive to cold and will perish during severe weather. The Carolina Wren is a highly adaptable creature, dwelling in swamps, forests, farms, and tree-filled urban and suburban communities. They hop around leaf litter and dense brush, using their elongated bills to forage for food close to the ground. A pair may bond any time of the year and will stay together for life. It is the ardent male who sings the loud song and he is apt to anytime and anywhere. Carolina Wrens work together to construct their nests and feed their young. Their nesting sites are varied, built in both man-made and natural nooks and crannies; tree holes and stumps, and just as frequently, windowsills, mailboxes, tin cans, garage shelves, and holes found in porches, fence posts, and barns.

A Duckworth’s Valentine’s

Heart Cappuccino ©Kim Smith 2015Sweet Valentine’s inspired cappuccino made by Michelle

Thanks to the fabulous Chef Ken Duckworth, along with his wonderfully welcoming and hard working staff, for making a Valentine’s to remember. Duckworth’s was overflowing with guests last night–no one wanted to leave as it was so warm and cozy there–and Tom and I just had the best time catching up with neighborhood friends. We all relished in our good fortune to be seated at the Duckworth’s Table for Valentine’s Day. Thank you Chef Ken and Family for the Best Ever Valentine’s Day Dinner!

Dan, Colleen, Michelle Duckworth's ©Kim Smith 2015Dan, Colleen, and Michelle

Lobster Risotto Ken Duckworth ©Kim Smith 2015Chef Ken’s Sublime Lobster Risotto ~ Tip: order the full serving and eat half (not to worry, the portions are hugely generous). Eat the other half for lunch the following day–doubly delish! Apologies please, my grainy phone photos don’t do this favorite dish justice.

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