Author Archives: Kim Smith

DOWN THE GARDEN PATH

monarch-new-england-aster-coneflower-copyright-kim-smithThe New England Asters and Quilled Coneflowers blooming in our garden during the months of September and October were planted to provide sustenance for migrating Monarchs. Although both are native wildflowers, the bees and butterflies visiting gardens at this time of year are much more interested in nectaring at the New England Asters.

Plant the following four native beauties and I guarantee, the pollinators will come!

New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae)

Seaside Goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)

Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)

monarch-butterfly-depositing-egg-milkweed-copyright-kim-smithFemale Monarch curling her abdomen to the underside and depositing eggs on Marsh Milkweed foliage.

BREAKING NEWS: GHS KURT LICHTENWALD NAMED MASSACHUSETTS TEACHER OF THE YEAR BY MassTEC!

The Gillnetter

Katelyn Moore, Staff Writer, Editor

coach-l-900x675GHS Science and Engineering Teacher Kurt Lichtenwald

The Massachusetts Technology Education and Engineering Collaborative and its members have awarded Gloucester High School’s science and engineering teacher, Kurt Lichtenwald, with the 2016 “teacher of the year” award.

Along with his award, MassTEC deemed GHS’ STEM program, run by Lichtenwald, John Barry, and David Schneider, the 2016 “program of the year.”  STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Each year, MassTEC partners with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and chooses from schools across the state to recognize one program and teacher that excels in educating students about formal technology and engineering studies.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

HAVE YOU SEEN THIS LITTLE BLUE HERON ON CAPE ANN?

little-blue-heron-egretta-caerulea-cape-ann-copyright-kim-smithThe Little Blue heron is common in the Southeast and only the second time I have spied this migrant on Cape Ann. I am curious to know if any of our readers have seen this pretty heron–how often, where, and at what time of year, if so. The Little Blue Heron in the photo was fishing in the shallow pond water with the Snowy Egrets. Whereas the Snowies have an energetic method of foraging, stirring up the bottom with their feet, dashing and diving, the Little Blue stood stock still observing the minnow’s movement in the water. The moment it caught a glimpse of me, off it flew, and did not return.little-blue-heron-massachusetts-egretta-caerulea-copyright-kim-smithlittle_bliue_heron_map_bigLittle Blue Heron range map

REMINDER- LYDA KUTH EVENT THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

Architect Eleanor Raymond: A Pioneer in the Field
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

The life and accomplishments of Eleanor Raymond (1887–1989), a pioneering woman in the field of architecture during the mid-20th century, will be the subject of a talk presented by documentary filmmaker Lyda Kuth. A graduate of the Cambridge School of Art and Landscape Architecture for Women, Eleanor Raymond was a noted innovator partnering with solar energy researcher Dr. Maria Telkes to design one of the first successful solar-heated buildings in the Northeast. On Cape Ann, Raymond designed homes for artist Natalie Hays Hammond, anthropologist Carlton S. Coon and a summer cottage for herself overlooking Gloucester’s outer harbor. Lyda Kuth is an independent filmmaker and Executive Director of the LEF Foundation, which supports New England independent documentary filmmakers. She has been recognized by the Massachusetts Cultural Council with the prestigious Commonwealth Award and honored by Women in Film and Video New England with an Image Award.

Member cost is $10 per lecture / $25 for the series; Non-member cost is $15 per lecture / $40 for the series. Reservations are required. To purchase tickets or for more information please call (978)283-0455 x10 or email info@capeannmuseum.org.

Tickets can also be ordered online at Eventbrite.

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ISRAEL HOROVITZ “MAN IN SNOW” WORLD PREMIERE THURSDAY NIGHT!

unnamedThe Gloucester Stage Company is excited to present the world premiere of Founding Artistic Director, Israel Horovitz’s newest play, Man In Snow. A drama suffused with relational cues and miscues, we follow the varied passions of a family seeking resolutions to the highs and lows of the mountains we climb in life. This is passionate, compelling storytelling that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

To learn more about Man in Snow, check out our podcast interview with director Israel Horovitz and Heid Dallin here.

To purchase tickets and show times visit the Gloucester Stage website here.

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LEND ME YOUR EAR

Sometimes they just don't want to leave home🌻#monarchbutterfly

A photo posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

I couldn’t resist taking a selfie with this newly emerged Monarch after she at first fluttered onto my shoulder, flew to my hat, and then decided to stay for a bit on my neck.

Butterflies have sharp crochet-like hooks at the bottom of their tarsi (butterfly name for feet) and it feels a bit pokey when they land on your skin. The hooks enable the butterfly to grip securely to surfaces. During a strong wind, the hooked tarsi are all that is keeping the butterfly grounded.

Thank you Nicole Duckworth for the photo caption🙂

TRAILS AND SAILS – THE SAILS

Magnificent sails and scenes out and about the Harbor during the Trails and Sails event this weekend.trails-and-sails-schooner-lannon-4-copyright-kim-smith

Schooner Lannon

trails-and-sails-sailboat-dove-2-copyright-kim-smithtrails-and-sails-sailboat-dove-3-copyright-kim-smithtrails-and-sails-sailboat-dove-copyright-kim-smithSailboat Dove

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Schooner Adventure Rounding Ten Pound Island

trails-and-sails-schooner-adventure-copyright-kim-smithtrails-and-sails-schooner-lannon-3-copyright-kim-smithSchooner Lannon and Ten Pound Island

trails-and-sails-schooner-lannon-copyright-kim-smithSchooner Lannon and Gloucester City Skyline

PLANTING MILKWEED WITH CAMILLA MACFADYEN AND THE SARROUFS!

img_4947img_4937Thank you to Dawn and John Sarrouf for sharing their milkweed planting photos. They are visiting their friend Camilla at her family home in Small Point Maine, which sounds like, from Dawn’s description, a gorgeously beautiful location, and ideal Monarch habitat. There are fields of wildflowers, and Seaside Goldenrod grows just as easily in the rocky outcroppings there as it does on Eastern Point. After looking at maps, it appears as if you could draw a virtual straight line from Small Point to Eastern Point. Dawn and friends spotted about ten butterflies yesterday. Perhaps we’ll be the next stop (after the predicted rainfall).

img_4946Camilla collected milkweed seed pods and enlisted the Sarroufs to help plant.

DAWN SARROUF PHOTOS

THE SCALE OF THE ZUIDERDAM

zuiderdam-cruise-ship-gloucester-harbor-massachusetts-usa-boston-skyline-copyright-kim-smithIn case you haven’t had the chance to check it out, these photos are an attempt to illustrate the size and scale of the cruise ship Zuiderdam in Gloucester Harbor. I was lucky to get the Schooner Adventure sailing past the ship during this weekend’s Trails and Sails event. I think the next largest ships in the Harbor that day were the Schooners Lannon and Adventure.

zuiderdam-cruise-ship-gloucester-harbor-massachusetts-usa-copyright-kim-smith

zuiderdam-cruise-ship-gloucester-harbor-massachusetts-usa-schooner-adventure-copyright-kim-smithSchooner Adventure and the Zuiderdam

zuiderdam-cruise-ship-gloucester-harbor-massachusetts-usa-ten-pound-island-copyright-kim-smithMoving past Ten Pound Island

 

GMG FRIENDS REPORT THEIR MONARCH BUTTERFLY SIGHTINGS!!

Thank you Cheryl Allen, Wingaersheek Anonymous, Shaina, Pat, and Ellen for sharing your Monarch sightings. I am so appreciative of your time and comments.

Cheryl Allen writes: I am not sure you want this information because I live in Northern Virginia, but I am seeing at least a dozen if not more on my tropical milkweed plants this week – this is after the Monarch’s laying eggs back in July and those developed Monarch’s flying off. They are coming from the North I expect, but am gratified by seeing so many this year – more than I have ever seen in my garden over the last thirty years.

I want to thank you for alerting me to the Monarch crisis three years ago, I started planting Milkweed and spread the word to all my gardener friends, until I read your post regarding this crisis, I had no idea! I always enjoy your posts so much, I just missed seeing the baby Plovers by one week and was pretty crestfallen when I arrived a week after they were born, and no baby Plovers – Thanks for being such a friend to our wildlife and letting us know how we can help, it is much appreciated!

Thank you Cheryl for sharing your photos!

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Shaina writes: So far we’ve only see two beautiful monarchs. One was over the wild flower field at Appleton farm in Hamilton this past weekend. The other was yesterday fluttering over the water at lighthouse beach in annisquam. Our 3 year old daughter is in awe of the Monarchs it is so exciting to watch her admire them. Will keep you posted on our monarch sightings!

Anonymous writes: I live at 8 Bungalow Road in Gloucester. It is at Wingaersheek Beach. My wife has a wonderful garden and I have seen three this year. I am not sure how many she has seen. My last sighting was about 2 weeks ago. None since.

Ellen writes: Hi Kim! Love the your beautiful photos. I spotted one lonely Monarch fluttering over the sand at Long Beach. In years past we used to watch a few of them on the beach, but this year only one so far.

Pat writes: Kim–I don’t know what happened to the comment I left earlier today reporting monarch sightings in the Binghamton NY area — a few–maybe once a day for the last week or 10 days. But I wondered how we know they aren’t the viceroy butterfly?

Sneak Peek and Premiering Tonight on Cape Ann TV: Concert for the Angels

“Songs for the Angels” a concert by Cape Ann Superstars to help fight addiction premieres this Friday, September 23 at 8pm on Cape Ann TV Channel 12.

This concert was recorded at Shalin Liu-Center to benefit the Police Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The concert features Allen Estes, Willie Alexander, Fly Amero, and Marina Evans. Quentin Callewaert opens the show, and includes a special performance from Chief Campanello, the founder of the PAARI program.
The show also airs this weekend on these times and dates:
Saturday, Sept. 24 at 8 am and 7:30 pm
Sunday, Sept. 25 at 6 am and 9 pm

CAPE ANN TV LUNCH AND LEARN: CANON FX-105 CAMCORDER

Cape Ann TV

Lunch & Learn Series:

“The Canon FX-105 Camcorder-Beyond Automatic”

 

Cape Ann TV’s Lunch & Learn Series continues on Wednesday, October 5th,2016 at 12pm with “”The Canon FX-105 Camcorder–Beyond Automatic”” presented by Professional Video Producer, Ted Reed.

Cape Ann TV has several Canon FX-105 HD camcorders available to its members for shooting projects outside our studio. They’re light, easy to run around with for action shooting, and produce great pictures and sound as a “point and shoot” video camera.

But this camera can do a whole lot more once you take the settings off automatic. Join us for our next “Lunch and Learn” at Cape Ann TV and see how to take this remarkable tool to the next level in picture control, audio and much more. Ted Reed, Emmy-award-winning TV director and cinematographer and Cape Ann resident, will lead this session.

 

Space is limited for this event; please RSVP to rtober@capeanntv.org to reserve your spot. 

PLEASE REPORT YOUR MONARCH SIGHTINGS HERE -THANK YOU!

There have been few Monarch sightings this summer but I have been hoping for a strong fall migration. The migration is peaking in Kansas and we are always a little bit behind. Please let me know if you see a Monarch, and where. Thank you very kindly!

Monarch stretching wide its wings in the morning sun #monarchbutterfly

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Monarchs are emerging daily in my garden, from eggs collected at my friend’s field in Salem. This too would be an indication that we may be seeing them soon.

newly-emerged-monarch-butterfly-copyright-kim-smith-jpgThis newly eclosed Monarch is clinging to its chrysalis case. Within moments of emerging, the two-part Monarch proboscis must zip together to form a siphoning tube. If the two parts do not join, the butterfly will not be able to drink nectar. In this photo, you can see the proboscis is not yet fully zipped. Note its wet, crumpled wings.

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