Author Archives: Kim Smith

CEDAR ROCK GARDENS IS OPEN MEMORIAL DAY!

Cedar rock Garden watering can copyright Kim SmithThanks to Elise Jillson from Cedar Rocks Gardens for a tremendously positive shopping experience. Every Cedar Rock plant is grown on the farm and every plant is lush, happy, and healthy. I had to ferry around several car loads of plants this afternoon and Elise was a fantastic help.

Cedar Rock Gardens will be open tomorrow, Monday, Memorial Day. For more information on their flowers and vegetables, CSA, and upcoming season of gorgeous cut flowers, check out Cedar Rocks Gardens website here and see a recent GMG post here: Fantastic Organic North Shore Veggie and Flower Farm Cedar Rock Gardens is Rockin!  

ICE HOUSE ART HOUSE!

IceHouse Cape Pond Ice copyrightKim SmithCheck out the fantastic new gallery above Cape Pond Ice. The space is undergoing some changes but can’t you just imagine what a gorgeous gallery it will make? To debut the gallery, on display are Sue Memhard’s beautiful dreamlike series of paintings. Sue was Scott’s cousin. She passed away several years ago. Sue painted and lived in Wayland with her husband Jim Crisp. I had the pleasure of meeting Jim at the gallery today and you can too. Stop in tomorrow, Sunday, for the official grand opening of Ice House Art House.

Sue Memhard copyright Kim SmithSue Memhard self-portrait with husband Jim and cat

Sue Memhard -2 copyright Kim Smith

For more information about Sue’s paintings, poetry, and books visit Sue Memhard here.

Ice House Art House is open tomorrow from 10am to 3pm. 

Scott Memhard copyright Kim SmithWard One City Councilor and Cape Pond Ice Proprietor Scott  Memhard

Ten Pound Island Cape Pond ice copyright Kim SmithView from the Ice House Art House roof deck. I bet this view looks spectacular in late day light!

 

WEST PARISH STUDENTS PRESENT “A PATRIOTIC PERFORMANCE” FOR THE MAYOY AT CITY HALL!

A musical, poetry, and historical fact extravaganza celebrating America was presented today at City Hall by the West Parish first grade students. Songs included God Bless America, America the Beautiful, You’re a Grand Old Flag, and the Star Spangled Banner. Thank you to Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken for sharing her photos!

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For lots more photos, visit Mayor Sefatia’s Facebook page here.

BREAKING: PAIR OF SWANS AT NILES AND HENRY’S PONDS!!

Pair Cape Ann Swans third year swans copyright Kim SmithA pair of swans was spotted at Niles Pond this morning by my friend Lyn. I stopped by the Pond at 8:15 to have a look. They were on the far side of Niles, getting ready to take off and was only able to take a few quick photos. The pair flew overhead in the direction of Henry’s Pond. After doing the podcast with Joey and the wonderful Gloucester Stage Company cast, I raced over to Henry’s. In the meantime, the two had returned to Niles, but were chased away by our Mr. Swan. As I arrived at Henry’s they flew in!

Cape Ann Swans copyright Kim SmithThe pair appear to be in their third year. This is evident by the patches of brown feathers and dullish pink bills, although the bill of the larger of the two is gaining a more coral-orange hue. Third year swan copyright Kim Smith copyNote both have black eyes, unlike our rare and beautiful blue-eyed swan. I am hopeful that Mr. Swan will find a new mate and if we are fortunate, this newly arrived on the scene pair will decide to make Cape Ann their home too!Pair Cape Ann Swans copyright Kim SmithIf you catch sight of swans at any of our area ponds or in the harbor, please write in and let me know. Thank you so much!

NPR’S OPEN STUDIO WITH JARED BOWEN FEATURING GLOUCESTER STAGE LETTICE AND LOVAGE!

Friday evening at 8:30pm, WGBH’s Open Studio with Jared Bowen will be featuring Gloucester Stage Company’s Lettice and Lovage. The show airs again on Saturday at 5:30am. Open Studio weekly spotlights arts and culture from around the region. For more information, visit the Open Studio web page here.

See too Wednesday’s Boston Globe review here. A grand tour from Lindsay Crouse in ‘Lettice and Lovage’

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CALL FOR ARTISTS!

That wonderfully talented painter Debbie Clarke has but out a “call for Glosta paintahs! Preference given to ahteests without a wall to hang on. I will be curating the wall at Zeke’s (restaurant in East Gloucester). My work is there until July 31st. Send me some shots.”

You can contact Debbie at: debbieclarkart@gmail.com or at facebook https://www.facebook.com/debbie.clarke.5011

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“Captain Joes Towards the Paint” by Debbie Clarke

TOP LILACS FOR FRAGRANCE

Fragrant lilacs copyright Kim Smith

Lilacs from our garden blooming in shades of pink, purple, blue, white and lavender

With our lilacs in full glorious bloom, and nearly knocking me out with their wonderfully delicious fragrance when walking down our garden path, I thought I’d post this excerpt from my book Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities ~ Notes from a Gloucester GardenNot all lilacs are fragrant and some not at all. Based on my years of planting lilacs for client’s gardens, and my own garden, with any one of the lilac cultivars listed here, you will not be disappointed. For information on how to grow lilacs, the chapter devoted to lilacs in Oh Garden! goes into greater detail.

Lilacs

False blue
White
Purple
Colour of lilac
Heart-leaves of lilac all over
New England,
Roots of lilac under all the soil
of New England,
Lilacs in me because I am
New England,
Because my roots are in it,
Because my leaves are in it,
Because my flowers are for it,
Because it is my country
And I speak to it of itself
And sing of it with my own voice.
Since certainly it is mine.

—from Lilacs by Amy Lowell (1874–1925)

Surely at the top of the list of shrubs to grow for creating the framework of an intimate garden or garden room are lilacs, in particular Syringa vulgaris and their French hybrids. Syringa vulgaris are grown for their exquisite beauty in both form and color of blossoms, although it is their fragrance flung far and throughout gardens and neighborhoods that make them so unforgettable.

Not all species of Syringa and cultivars of Syringa vulgaris are scented. The early French hybrids and hybrids of Leonid Kolesnikov have retained their fragrance. Syringa oblata has a similar fragrance, though is not nearly as potent. Several of the Chinese species have a spicy cinnamon scent, while many of the Asian species and their hybrids have very little, if any, fragrance. To find your personal preference, I suggest a visit to a local arboretum, or take your nose to the nursery during the extended period of time (six to eight weeks, or so) in which the different cultivars of S. vulgaris are in bloom.

Nearly everywhere lilacs are grown (and here I am only referring to S. vulgaris), they are called by some variety of the word lilac. Perhaps the word lilac stems from the Persian word Lilak or Lilaf meaning bluish. The French say Lilas, the Spanish say Lila, and the Portuguese Lilaz. In old English lilacs were called Laylock, Lilack, and Lilock.

Lilacs are native to and found growing among the limestone rocks on the hillsides and mountainsides throughout southeastern Europe, in the Balkans, Moldavia, Serbia, Macedonia, and Yugoslavia. Cultivated by local mountain herdsmen, they were taken from the peasant villages of central Europe to the garden courts of Istanbul. In 1563, the Flemish scholar and traveler Ogier Ghiselin, Count de Busbecq, Ambassador of Ferdinand I of Austria to the court of Suleiman the Magnificent, brought back to Vienna gifts from the sultan’s garden. Attracting much attention was the lilac. Seven years later, in 1570, Ogier Ghiselin, Count de Busbecq, and then Curator of the Imperial Court Library, accompanied the Archduchess Elizabeth from Vienna to Paris where she was betrothed to King Charles IX of France. Count de Busbecq journeyed to France with a shoot of Syringa vulgaris, where it soon began to fill the gardens of Paris.

Two color variants sprang up in European gardens beside the wild blue- flowered lilac, a nearly white flowered variant with lighter foliage and a taller- growing variant with deeper purple flowers. Hybridizers quickly set about to create different forms and color versions from these two variants.

Blue Lilac President Grevy copyright Kim Smith

Blue lilac – ‘President Grevy’

Victor Lemoine of the famed nursery Victor Lemoine et Fils at Nancy in Lorraine Province continued the work of hybridizing lilacs. From 1878 to 1950, Victor and his wife, their son Emile, and their grandson, Henri, created 214 lilac cultivars. The cornerstone of the Lemoine’s lilac hybridizing program was a nat- ural sport that bore two corollas, one inside the other, making it the first dou- ble. This double was subsequently named ‘Azurea Plena.’ Because of the Lemoine family’s success in turning ordinary lilacs into fancy double-flowered lilacs in nearly every hue imaginable, they became known as the “French lilacs.” Spreading throughout Europe, the French lilacs were brought to the Russian court by French travelers. Well suited to the soil and climate of Russia, they soon spread far and wide. Several decades later, the Russian hybridist Leonid Kolesnikov continued the successful work of the Lemoines with his own exquisite variants.

The French and Dutch colonists transported lilacs to North America. These cherished cuttings, wrapped in burlap and wet straw tucked into suitcases for the long journey across the Atlantic, traveled well and were soon growing throughout the colonies. By 1753 the Quaker botanist John Bartram of Philadelphia was complaining that lilacs were already too numerous. One of two of the oldest col- lections of lilacs in North America are at the Governor Wentworth home in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, planted by the governor in 1750. The second collection, perhaps one hundred years older, is at Mackinac Island in Michigan, where French Jesuit missionaries living in the area are thought to have planted them as early as 1650.

Maiden's Blush Lilac copyright Kim Smith

Pink lilac – ‘Maiden’s Blush’

With their traveling fragrance, versatility in the landscape, and their ability to live tens, perhaps even hundreds of years, lilacs are garden heirlooms. When selecting lilacs to grow for creating the framework of the garden, take the time to choose wisely. Some lilacs grow readily into a tree shape (‘Beauty of Moscow’), while others are somewhat relatively lower growing cultivars; ‘Wedgwood Blue’ comes to mind, and still others, the common white lilac (Syringa vulgaris var. alba), sucker more freely. And bear in mind that different lilacs bloom over an extended period of time. If you wish to have a blue lilac blooming simultaneously with a white lilac, then it is worthwhile to determine whether a specific cultivar is an early, mid, or late season bloomer. The following is a selection of lilacs growing in our garden, arranged in their sequential progression of flowering, with considerable overlapping. They are all highly scented or we wouldn’t grow them. The last photo below shows the different colors in lilac blossoms of white, pink, blue, lavender, magenta.

Beauty of Moscow Lilac copyright Kim SmithSyringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Maiden’s Blush’

S. x hyacinthiflora ‘Maiden’s Blush’ (1966) Skinner ~ Single, pale rose pink; shows different colors of pink under different soil conditions. In a warmer climate and lighter soils it is a paler shade of pink, in heavier soils ‘Maiden’s Blush’ has more lavender undertones.

‘Krasavitsa Moskvy’ translated to ‘Beauty of Moscow.’ Leonid Alexseevitch Kolesnikov (1974) ~ Double, lavender-rose tinted buds opening to white-tinted pink. Grown throughout Russia. Vigorous upright habit, useful for growing into a tree-shape. Very extended blooming period.

Syringa vulgaris var. purpurea. Common purple lilac ~ Lavender, the wild species seen growing throughout its native land. The common purple is the most widely distributed form of lilac. The lilac of old gardens.

‘Wedgwood Blue’ John Fiala (1981) ~ Hanging panicles of beautiful true blue florets. Lilac-pink hued buds. Somewhat lower growing.

‘Madame Florent Stepman’ (1908) ~ Satiny ivory white florets from rose- washed buds. Pure white when fully opened. Tall and upright growing. One of the most extensively cultivated for the florist trade.

‘President Grevy’ Lemoine (1886) ~ Pure blue, immense panicles of sweet starry florets.

‘Marie Legraye’ (1840) ~ Single, diminutive florets, radiant white, lighter green foliage.

‘Monge’ Lemoine (1913) ~ Vivid, intense plum wine fading to deepest rose.

‘Andenken an Ludwig Spaeth’ Nursery of Ludwig Spaeth (1883) ~ Single, rich purple-violet with a smaller pointed-head panicle.

Fragrant Lilacs -2 copyright Kim Smith copyClockwise from upper right: Pale pink ‘Maiden’s Blush,’ common white, double-flowered ‘Beauty of Moscow,’ ‘Monge,’ common white, ‘President Grevy’ (blue), and common purple.

Above excerpt from Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities! Notes from a Gloucester Garden (David R. Godine, Publisher), written and illustrated by Kim Smith.

Link to David R. Godine website for more information Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities ~ Notes from a Gloucester Garden

Male Black Swallowtail Wedgwood Blue Lilac copyright Kim SmithNewly emerged male Black Swallowtail Butterfly and ‘Wedgwood’ blue lilac.

MUSICAL MORNING WITH THE GODDESS FAMILY AT CAPE ANN PRESCHOOL!

Goddesses Cape Ann Preschool copyright Kim SmithThank you Goddess Family for the invitation to come see Tony and Samantha’s super fun Musical Morning at Cape Ann Preschool. Dancing, singing, and with Tony allowing the children to strum his guitar, a wonderful time was had by all!

Love Tony and Samantha Goddess sharing music with Cape Ann Preschool ❤️

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

Goddesses Cape Ann Preschool -2 copyright Kim SmithMany in the community are familiar with Cape Ann Preschool (formerly Lanesville Preschool), but if not, they are located just off Washington Street on Gloucester Avenue, soon to be relocating to 488 Essex Avenue beginning in August. Cape Ann Preschool is a play-based preschool program and, according to their website blend academic school readiness, social skills, and developmentally appropriate learning for children ages 2.9 -6. For more information, visit the Cape Ann Preschool website here.

For more about the Goddesses, visit Bang-A-Song studio here.

I leave you with Ants in My Pants –

Ants in My Pants with the Goddesses:)

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

NEW GALLERY DEBUTING THIS WEEKEND: ART AT THE ICE HOUSE!

Debuting at this weekend’s Harbortown Arts Festival, we are pleased to announce our new “ART @ the Ice House” gallery at Cape Pond Ice Company, Fort Wharf, 104 Commercial Street, Gloucester.

We will be hosting an Open House / Gallery launch Saturday, Sunday &Monday, May 28 – 30, from 10 am – 3 pm.  A special retrospective of the paintings and art of Sue Memhard (1941-2011) will be featured. www.SueMemhard.com for more information about Sue’s life, creative passions, work and art.

nightflight“Night Flight” c. Sue Memhard, acrylic & collage on wood

Gallery space to exhibit is also available – painting, pottery, sculpture & photography – so please contact us if interested in showing with us this summer. Email:  office@capepondice.com  Fort Wharf Arts Collective, Gallery @ Cape Pond Ice Company.

Microsoft Word - Art@theIcehouse 2-2.docx

DEADLY PAGES

Lovers of all novels thriller and adventure, check out Deadly Pages, a new book co-authored by my husband Tom Hauck with his client Leslie Norins, MD.
Deadly Pages
When a Syrian refugee appears in New York with a fatal case of smallpox – a disease that medical science had declared eradicated from the face of the earth – ace virologist Martin Riker is called in to track down the source of the deadly disease. In a thrilling journey that takes him to the dangerous streets of war-torn Syria, Riker uncovers a breathtaking plot to kill thousands of innocent Americans using a devious method that experts would never suspect!

FIRST LOOK BEAUTIFUL GOOD HARBOR BEACH PIPING PLOVERS!

PIPING PLOVERS RUNNING 2 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITHNot shy in the least, the four Good Harbor Beach Piping Plovers spent the early part of the morning running and feeding along the shoreline, bathing in the tidal flats, and ferociously defending their territory against other avian intruders. A jogger ran past the one preening at the water’s edge–he was quite close–but that did not seem to alarm the Plover. They are diminutive little creatures, about six to seven inches in length, and show mostly white feathers when flying overhead.

PIPING PLOVERS -Eating 4 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

Breakfast – Piping Plovers eat insects and small invertebrates

One Piping Plover seemed to be testing different sites to nest, momentarily hunkering down, then leaving the spot, and then returning a few moments later to vigorously dig a deeper depression in the sand, before then flying away.

PIPING PLOVERS NESTING -5 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITHTesting the depression

PIPING PLOVERS NESTING 2 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

Leaving the possible nesting site

PIPING PLOVERS -5 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

Returning to the depression

PIPING PLOVERS NESTING -3 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

PIPING PLOVERS NESTING -4 GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

Digging in!

PIPING PLOVERS NESTING GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITH

The roped off area appears to be a terrific solution in helping to protect the possible nesting sites. Visitors to Good Harbor Beach this morning were very mindful about respecting the boundary. And there was not a single dog in sight, off leash or otherwise. The Plovers flew in and out of the restricted area, as did Killdeers and several other species of shore birds.

KILLDEER GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITHA Killdeer feeding near the Piping Plovers. The Killdeers, also members of the Charadadriidae, are slightly larger and a much darker brown than the Piping Plovers.

PIPING PLOVERS GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER -1 COPYRIGHT KIM SMITHPIPING PLOVERS PREENING GOOD HARBOR BEACH GLOUCESTER COPYRIGHT KIM SMITHPreening

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2016 GLOUCESTER CITIZENSHIP AWARD RECIPIENTS!

DSCF3689To receive a Gloucester Citizenship Awards is a very special honor. Each May the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church recognizes outstanding Gloucester citizens for their selfless good work. The citizenship award is a “celebration of civic pride and a reminder that each of us can make a difference.”

Congratulations to the 2016 Gloucester Citizen Award winners Pauline Bresnahan, Ellie Cummings, Nome Graham, George Hackford, Charles Nazarian, Patti Page, Save Our Shores Gloucester (Pam and Mark Poulin), Peter Souza, Dolores Talbot, and Alice and Mike Wheeler.

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Sea Shanty Singers at the 2016 Gloucester Citizenship Awards (withZinnia)

A video posted by Kim Smith (@kimsmithdesigns) on

 

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