Author Archives: Kim Smith

DEBUNKING PIPING PLOVER MYTHS #2 AND #3

Debunking Piping Plover Myths #2 and #3

Myth #2: “The reason the Piping Plovers are nesting in the parking lot is because when they first arrived to Gloucester it was cold and they find the asphalt warmer.”

Not true and by this logic, Piping Plovers would be nesting in parking lots from here to Canada!

Piping Plovers arrive at Atlantic coast and Great Lakes beaches every year between April and May. Along the Atlantic Coast, they breed from the mid-Atlantic to New England all the way to the maritime provinces of Canada, as far north as Newfoundland and Labrador. The temperature is no colder on a Gloucester beach than a beach on Plum Island or a beach on Prince Edward Island.

Myth #3: “The reason the Piping Plovers are nesting in the parking lot is because the tides are higher and the beach area was disrupted after the winter storms.”

Also not true. 

Piping Plovers typically nest on both narrow and wide sandy beaches. Unfortunately, nests and eggs are occasionally swept away during a storm when the tides are high.

Beaches all along the Massachusetts coastline were hit hard by late winter storms however, Piping Plovers often do well on beaches where winter storms have created a change in the topography. Storms generate what is called overwash, when water from the sea carrying beach sediments flows onto the dunes. Overwash is critical for beaches to maintain their shape and size in the face of sea level rise. The best foraging areas for Piping Plovers are known where you have large expansive mudflats created by storm overwash.

Good Harbor Beach Piping Plover parking lot nest and eggs.

As you can see, there is a theme to these comments, to blame the fact that the PiPl are nesting in the parking lot on everything else except what in actuality drove them to the parking lot.

Constant and unrelenting disruption by dogs off leash in the nesting area is what forced the Piping Plovers to the parking lot.

By speaking frankly to help bring awareness about what occurred in the nesting area at Good Harbor Beach during the months of April and May is by no means meant to malign or portray as wicked and threatening dogs or dog owners. Disruption by dogs was witnessed by myself, by fellow PiPl volunteers, as well as by Greenbelt and Mass Wildlife representatives, and the dog officers. 

In the minds of our nesting pair of Piping Plovers, the Good Harbor Beach parking lot was seemingly the safest location at the time of mating and nest scraping, as it was also the quietest and least disrupted. Readers may be wondering, why did our pair not nest in the wide expanse of dunes? I think the green growth found in the dune habitat does not provide protective camouflage as do the white painted lines and gravel found in the parking lot. If you have stopped by to see the PiPl in the parking lot, you may have noticed that they are practically invisible, the way they blend in with their surroundings. The little pair are certainly resourceful!

Don’t mistake their resourceful choice of nesting locations as ideal. The parking lot is a horrendous place to nest. It is far away from their food and water. Piping Plover parents take turns sitting on the nest. In a normal situation where the nest is on the beach, one sits on the nest while the other forages close by, but at the same time is always on the lookout to zoom in and help defend the nest from real and imagined predators. Under the parking lot circumstance, while one is brooding in the lot and the other foraging on the beach, they are not in constant contact or communication with one another, making the chance of successfully hatching young all that much slimmer.

And safeguarding the chicks during their first days after hatching in the parking lot, until they make the epic journey to the beach, is going to be a monumental challenge and take tremendous teamwork.

Mama at the parking lot nest exclosure while Papa is foraging at the beach and out of the range of communication.

The problems that arise with dogs on the beach during shorebird nesting season has been dealt with and resolved conscientiously in coastal communities over decades.

Some solutions for next year:

  1. With gratitude to Mayor Sefatia and the DPW, effective signage has been posted at each beach entryway. The signs need to be in place all year round because they also have a No Dunes icon. Letting people know that throughout the year the dunes are off limits to people and pets will help lessen erosion and create a healthier dune habitat, which over time will help protect our beach for everyone.
  2. Enforcement of existing ordinances.
  3. Education about the life story of the Piping Plovers.
  4. Recently a meeting of the Animal Advisor Committee was held at City Hall. Many suggestions and proposals were discussed. A very simple and effective solution for Good Harbor Beach is to close the beach to all dogs beginning April 1st and to reopen on September 16th, making the time dogs are allowed on the beach only two weeks shorter than the existing ordinance. The time period from April 1st to September 15th would give all shorebirds the uninterrupted space needed to mate and establish their nests, and time enough for the young to fledge.

The Piping Plover mating dance is elaborate. Each time the PiPl are interrupted, they do not resume where leaving off, but begin the dance anew. In the above photo, the male is high stepping all around the female while she has positioned herself to accept the next step, where he jumps on her back, and they connect, cloaca to cloaca. The courtship dance takes about twenty to thirty minutes while copulation only lasts a mere minute.

 

 

 

 

 

OUTSTANDINGLY CLEAR NEW SIGNS POSTED AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH!

Thank you to Mayor Sefatia and the DPW for the fantastic signs, which are now posted at each and every entrance to the beach, from the Good Harbor Beach Inn entrance to the back marsh entrance, and all the boardwalks in between. The signs are just so tremendously helpful for monitoring the Piping Plovers! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Beautiful Fish: Pilotfish (2) -By Al Bezanson

 

 Sailing to San Juan with pilotfish 

Continued from May 15th GMG post: Follow the red from March 28th to April 10th

From the log of SERENDIPITY, April 10, 1961

El Morro is abeam and we are having a better day than Sir Francis Drake who was driven away from the fortress in 1595 with a cannon shot through his cabin. For us it has been 13-1/2 days from Nassau, sailing 819 NM at an average of 2-1/2 kt. Only after we reach the murky harbor water do we lose sight of the three pilot fish that have been our companions for 13 days. Three buckets hold components of our engine, which sputtered its last in Nassau Harbor.

Al Bezanson

SEE MADAME DEFARGE AT THE GLOUCESTER STAGE COMPANY BEFORE IT GOES TO BROADWAY!

See Madame Defarge at GSC Before It Goes to Broadway

By Tom Hauck

In the world of theatre there’s nothing more thrilling than attending a new work and, after the curtain falls and the applause dies away, you get up from your seat convinced the show you’ve just seen is destined for Broadway.

Such is the case with Madame Defarge, the new musical by Wendy Kesselman now making its world premiere at the Gloucester Stage Company. Directed by Ellie Heyman, this grand historical epic, based on the Charles Dickens classic A Tale of Two Cities, packs a solid emotional punch while presenting themes of authoritarianism and state power that resonate today.

When entering the theater, the first thing you’ll notice is the jagged, multilevel set designed by James Fluhr. It’s an angular yet fluid space, penetrated by sharp arrows of light and given a sense of gloom by the ever-present haze in the air (absolutely safe to breathe, we’re reassured). In a bold choice, the orchestra—a superbly polished trio of piano, clarinet, and cello—occupies the middle of the space, around which the actors pursue their personal objectives and occasionally physically chase each other. The back wall of the stage is a set of prison bars—the dreaded Bastille, where Dr. Manette has been imprisoned for eighteen years and whose release ignites the story.

The cast of ten is outstanding. On the French side we find the revolutionaries Therese and Ernest Defarge (Jennifer Ellis and Benjamin Evett), the cruel and pompous Monsieur Le Marquis (John Hillner), and the lately imprisoned Dr. Manette (Rob Karma Robinson). Across the Channel reside the handsome nephew of Monsieur Le Marquis, Charles Darnay (Matthew Amira); the barrister Sydney Carton (Jason Michael Evans), who happens to look like the twin of Charles Darnay (this is key to the plot); Dr. Manette’s daughter Lucie Manette (Sabrina Koss); and her guardian, Miss Pross (Wendy Waring).

Meanwhile, expertly handling a total of five roles is John Shuman (to quickly know whom he’s playing, keep an eye on his costume changes).

While everyone on the stage shines, particular note must be made of Marissa Simeqi, who in the multiple roles of Little Lucie, Young Therese, and Street Urchin takes the spotlight with confidence.

The cast will be remembered for originating their roles, and justly so. Together they work through the complex plot with its many twists and turns, and make the emotional connections with the audience that bring the sweeping scale of the story down to a human level.

While the show’s program provides a brief introduction to the characters and setting at the beginning of the play, it’s probably a good idea to familiarize yourself with the intricate plot of A Tale of Two Cities. If you know the story before you take your seat, you’ll be able to focus on the outstanding performances without the burden of keeping a scorecard of who’s doing what to whom.

It’s easy to imagine Madame Defarge being scaled up to a full Broadway production with big sets, lavish costumes, and a full orchestra and cast. The story is solid and the characters are well developed. In short, you have a choice: See Madame Defarge now at our own Gloucester Stage Company where the talented actors perform up close up and personal, or wait and pay $100 a ticket for nosebleed seats in a vast auditorium on Broadway.

Congratulations to the Gloucester Stage Company for opening its 2018 season with a stunning gem. Madame Defarge is playing now through June 2. For tickets, go to http://www.gloucesterstage.com or call 978-281-4433.

TRACKING WILD CREATURES ON OUR LOCAL BEACHES (WILL BEARS BE NEXT?)

Just some of the paw prints seen on our local beaches this spring are Eastern Coyote, Red Fox, Skunk, Racoon, White-tailed Deer, and of course, a plethora of crows and gulls.

If you would like to see what wildlife traverses and scavenges Cape Ann beaches when we humans are not there, the best time to look is early, early in the morning, before the tracks are disturbed. Oftentimes the best days to look are after a rain storm, especially after the sand has dried a bit. Forget about tracking tracks on a windy morning. If you are not sure what you are seeing, take a close-up photo of the track, and then take a long shot, too, to see the pattern of the tracks.  

The Mass Wildlife Pocket Guide is the best handy track identification tool because it shows clearly the tracks, as well as the pattern of the tracks, and only shows wildlife we see in Massachusetts.

My favorite tracks to find are (no mystery here) Piping Plover tracks, which are wonderfully shaped, like a diminutive fleur de lis.

Piping Plover tracks showing courtship activity

I am waiting to see Black Bear tracks. Just kidding, although, the range of the Black Bear is expanding from western Massachusetts eastward. I imagine that within ten years Black Bears will, at the very least be frequent visitors to Cape Ann, or will be living in our midst. Just the thing Joey will be thrilled to know 🙂

Learn more about Black Bears here.

The Black Bears expanding range in Massachusetts.

Black Bear Cubs

Photo courtesy wikicommons media

AMELIE SEVERANCE’S LOVELY DRAWING OF THE YOUNG SWAN

GMG FOB Jennifer Cullen shares this beautiful drawing of our Young Swan by Amélie Severance. Jenn writes the following, ” I told Amélie (9-years old) the story of Young Swan and Mr. Swan and showed her a few of Kim Smith’s pics from GMG…next thing you know, she drew this for me. Well done, Amélie!”  

PRESS RELEASE AND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FOR THE OFFICIAL RELEASE OF THE CHILDREN’S BOOK “NONNA, WHAT IS ST. PETER’S FIESTA?”

The members of St. Peter’s Fiesta Committee in collaboration with Buttieri Press are pleased to announce the release of an illustrated children’s book that explains the meaning behind the traditions of Gloucester’s St. Peter’s Fiesta.

Nonna, What is St. Peter’s Fiesta? is the story of a young boy, Joey, and his cousins Amelia and Jacob who accompany their grandmother during the weekend festivities, learning as they go, about this annual celebration.

Nonna, What is St. Peter’s Fiesta? is written through the eyes of children and aims to preserve an understanding of the values behind the tradition.

Every child has her or his favorite book, a book they want read to them again and again. As Joe Novello, Committee President, points out, “When they have a book they enjoy, they always pick that book to read and have it read to them. At some point there is a connection and the meaning of the book comes across, which is the intent. Then when Fiesta comes they can relate to it because the story has been read to them a hundred times. It’s embedded in them.”

The author, Laura M. Alberghini Ventimiglia, is a Gloucester resident whose family has a history of being involved with Fiesta. Even before the Fiesta began in the Italian neighborhood known as the Fort, relatives were living there and four generations experienced first hand the true meaning of Fiesta. This experience now extends through to the sixth generation with the author’s grandchildren.

Ventimiglia was inspired to write the book during the 2015 Fiesta. Participating with her children, grandchildren, and extended family members, she noticed that while everyone was having fun; the majority of people were enjoying the Fiesta as if it were a carnival. She realized that the further away from the original Fiesta, the further away participants are from knowing and understanding the meanings of the values behind the tradition.

She approached St. Peter’s Fiesta Committee members with her idea of a children’s book. They recognized the same dilemma of time. Committee members thought it was a great idea and decided to support the project because a children’s book could explain how the Fiesta started and what it was about. Anthony Cusumano, Committee Treasurer, described it appropriately. “So many years, generations have passed that maybe the younger generation had lost the original meaning. We wanted to bring it back to its roots. Help the young kids today know what the whole meaning of Fiesta is, what the meaning of the novena is, the greasy pole contest, the seine boats and so forth. We wanted to get back to the times when that’s what the Gloucester fishing fleet was about.”

Ventimiglia worked with Committee members for two years, gathering their ideas, and keeping them informed of the progress of writing, illustrating, and finally printing. She also spent months researching early Fiesta stories through microfilmed newspaper articles and interviewing people including Sara Favazza. Favazza is the youngest child of Captain Salvatore Favazza who commissioned the original statue in 1927 leading to the founding of the Fiesta tradition. “Sara was an amazing resource and infused her energy for the Fiesta into our work,” Ventimiglia says. “She was generous with her time, met frequently with me and even invited the illustrator, Maura O’Connor, and me to lunch. Maura dubbed Sara, ‘Fiesta Royalty’.”

Favazza describes Nonna, What is St. Peter’s Fiesta? as “a beautiful book, a wonderful book that every child would love to have.” She says, “It’s marvelous. Every parent in Gloucester should buy one to read to their children to find out what the Fiesta is all about.”

Committee members say they are looking forward to this year’s Fiesta. They describe Fiesta as a time for family and friends, “a time for people to get together and reunite,” according to Novello. “As generations grew and spread throughout the country, Fiesta became a time when people return home, return to Gloucester knowing they will see people they haven’t seen in a year.” And, every year Committee members try to do something special. A special happening this year will be the release of Nonna, What is St. Peter’s Fiesta?

A family and friends release by the Committee for the 2017 holidays generated great excitement about the children’s book spurring tremendous anticipation for the upcoming sales to the general public.

Illustrator O’Connor, a graduate of Montserrat School of Art, lives in Beverly yet visited Gloucester often sketching the workings of its harbor. Diletta Ballati who lives in Italy and considers Gloucester her American home, translated the book into Italian, available online at https://buttieripress.com/festa.

The book also includes a brief history of the Fiesta, photos from the initial years, and photos by Kim Smith and Bridgette Mathews of last year’s 90th celebration.

All proceeds from sales of the book go to The St. Peter’s Fiesta, Inc., a 501c3 organization aimed at preserving this Sicilian-Italian American tradition of Gloucester’s fishermen.

Scheduled to be released to the public on June 1, 2018, accompanying events throughout the month include:

June 1 to June 30 –The Bookstore of Gloucester – Artist of the Month, the original illustrations of the book will be on display.

June 2 – Sawyer Free Children’s Library kicks off events with the official children’s book launch from 10:00am to 11:30am with the author, illustrator, and Sara Favazza. The event is co-hosted by The Bookstore of Gloucester.

June 9 – Cape Ann Museum will host a CAM Kids program from 10am to 12 noon.

June 16 – Sawyer Free Children’s Library hosts a Fiesta Children’s Program from 10:30am to 11:30am with authors Laura M. Alberghini Ventimiglia and Alice Gardner with activities from their books Nonna, What is St. Peter’s Fiesta? and St. Peter’s Fiesta: Gloucester, Massachusetts.

June 29 to July 1 – St. Peter’s Fiesta Kiosk by the Altar will have books available to purchase.

June 30 – The Bookstore of Gloucester will hold a book signing from 1pm to 3pm with the author, illustrator, and Sara Favazza.

Books are available at each of the above events and at the following:

The Bookstore, 61 Main Street, Gloucester

Harbor Loop Gifts, Building Center of Gloucester, 1 Harbor Loop, Gloucester

Cape Ann Museum, 27 Pleasant Street, Gloucester

Buttieri Press, https://buttieripress.com

 Sara Favazza unveiling the new Saint Peter, Saint Peter’s Fiesta opening ceremony, 2017.     

DEBUNKING PIPING PLOVER MYTH #1

Debunking Piping Plover Myth #1

“Because of those gosh darn *&%$@# Piping Plovers, Gloucester is going to lose tens of thousands of dollars in parking revenue.”

Not true.

Here is why. The Piping Plovers will be out of the parking lot, before the summer season begins and before school is out!

The one thing the parking lot PiPl have going for them is that they laid their eggs relatively early in the season. If the nest is left undisturbed, by the time the chicks hatch, we will be in the second week of June. It may take a day or two for them to make the epic journey to the beach, where they will much prefer to spend the summer. At the very latest, the chicks will be out of the parking lot by the third week of June.

So to be completely clear: the Good Harbor Beach parking lot is not closing and we will have ample parking during the summer months.

I hope this quells the rumors circulating. Look for more PiPl myths debunked this week in upcoming posts 🙂 Please share this post to help folks understand more about our Good Harbor Beach parking lot Plovers.

Fluffing and puffing – morning bath for Mama Plover.

ANOTHER SNOWY OWL SPOTTED IN GLOUCESTER!

Reader Beth Grahm writes the following, “Hi Kim.  Unbelievable!  There is a Snowy perched on the rocks outside our condo at Old Nugent Farm.  Right now.  Hedgwig?”

Hi Beth, Thank you for sharing your Snowy Owl sighting!! Your owl spotted is definitely a female although, I don’t think it’s Hedwig based on the shape of the feather patterning around her forehead. Anyway, it’s wonderful to see and share so many Snowy Owls this year, thank you!

Dear Readers, please write and let us know if you are still seeing Snowy Owls. Thank you!

CONGRATULATIONS TO SEASIDE SUSTAINABILITY!

Seaside Sustainability Inc. Celebrates the Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary’s Award and Massachusetts Marine Educators Certificate of Appreciation Award

Boston, MA: This past week, Seaside Sustainability Inc. went to receive the EEA Secretary’s award and the MME Certificate of Appreciation, two awards acknowledging recent successes in their overall performance. Seaside Sustainability is an organization built to educate and raise awareness about conservation using STEM projects to teach the community about their cause. After the company took off in early 2017, Seaside Sustainability and its projects have gained serious momentum and are now looking at expansion and regional change.

Seaside is thrilled to have been honored with these awards due to the fact that the Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary’s Award specifically acknowledges organizations that teach and foster communal knowledge about the environment and sustainability, while the Massachusetts Marine Educators Certificate of Appreciation acknowledges services and commitment to the advancement of marine science. Receiving these awards not only brings attention and prestige to the company, it also shows that Seaside is achieving its main goal and mission of educating the community about the cause of helping our environment. As a response to the awards, Eric Magers, the cofounder of Seaside Sustainability, claims that it “is one thing to receive both awards, but another to accomplish the main goal of the organization.”

Retrieval of the Secretary’s Award and the MME Certificate of Appreciation means that Seaside will work even harder to expand regional initiatives for the upcoming summer of 2018 as well as branch out as far as possible in order to spread its mission of saving local shorelines and, ultimately, the ocean itself.

About Seaside: Seaside Sustainability is a non-profit organization aimed at using STEM opportunities for communal youth to teach the importance of conservation and sustainability utilizing hands-on, meaningful experience. Seaside has thus far given an insurmountable amount of knowledge to its participants and hopes to expand its initiatives to other towns in the North Shore, and beyond.

UPDATE ON OUR YOUNG SWAN AND HUGE SHOUT OUT TO LYN FONZO, DR. CAHILL, AND SKIP HADDEN

Our Young Swan, or Schwan as Lyn calls him, is resting comfortably at Lyn’s home. Lyn and Skip (Lyn’s neighbor and longtime caregiver to Mr. Swan) brought Schwan to see Dr. Cahill at Seaport Veterinary Hospital this morning. Dr. Cahill’s diagnosis is that his foot most likely sustained only a soft tissue injury. He is on both antibiotics and pain medicine. After a week of rest, Dr. Cahill will decide if he needs an X-ray.

Many, many thanks to Dr. Cahill for generously donating his services.

After recovering, Schwan may be heading to North Carolina. Lyn has a friend with a farm and a pond. The pond even has a floating raft for ducks and geese!

Lyn Fonzo Photo

DR. RAY CAHILL

SEAPORT VETERINARY HOSPITAL

100 EASTERN AVENUE

GLOUCESTER, MA

978-283-8883

 

 

Our Young Swan Suffers a Second Attack

The Young Swan has survived a second attack by Mr. Swan, but only barely. He is injured and needs veterinary care.
The Young Swan is temporarily back at Lyn Fonzo’s swan sanctuary, until a forever home can be found. Photo courtesy Lyn Fonzo.
Katia Mason shares the following, “Tonight the Young Swan was being chased then attacked by the Senior Male Swan in the Harbor. The neighbors at Hawthorne Point ran into the harbor and broke up the attack and protected the young swan.  Thank goodness for Jodi Swenson at Cape Ann Wildlife who got their message and came to help complete the rescue before the tide came in and it got too dark.
Thanks to the Good Morning Gloucester Blog, neighbors had been following the story and knew what was happening. “
Katia Mason Photos

BREAKING: TONIGHT ON FOX 25 WITH LITSA PAPPAS SEE OUR GOOD HARBOR BEACH PARKING LOT PLOVERS!

Thank you to reporter Litsa Pappas and videographer Steve Wright from Fox 25 for taking the time to learn about Gloucester’s nesting Piping Plovers and for sharing their story 🙂

 

Steve Wright and Litsa Pappas

The story airs tonight at 6 on Fox 25!

COME LEND A VOICE TO HELP GLOUCESTER’S PIPING PLOVERS AT TONIGHT’S ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING

Gloucester’s Animal Advisory Committee is meeting tonight to vote on whether or not to change the Good Harbor Beach dog rules. The meeting is at 6:30 at City Hall, 3rd floor. At present dogs are allowed at GHB through April 30th. Our hope is that the new ordinance would shorten the time, to end on March 31st. Nesting Piping Plovers, as well as the many species of shorebirds migrating through (and some also nesting at) Good Harbor Beach would benefit tremendously from this change to the ordinance. Thank you!

Piping Plover on the Half Shell

LEARNING ABOUT HOW MASSACHUSETTS COMMUNITIES MANAGE NESTING PIPING PLOVERS

To better understand how to help Gloucester’s Good Harbor Beach Piping Plovers survive nesting at our most well loved and highly trafficked beach I have been following a little Plover family at Revere Beach. 

Like Gloucester, Revere is a city north of Boston. Only ten square miles, with six miles of land, four miles of water, and a population of 52,000 people, Revere is a much more densely populated city than Gloucester. Gloucester’s year round population is 28,000, covering an area of 41 square miles, with 26 miles of land and 15 miles of water.

Revere Beach is the first public beach established in America (1895). Misperceptions about a needle and trash littered shoreline are deeply held but in reality, Revere Beach is a beautiful beach, beautifully maintained.

Each year Revere Beach hosts the International Sand Sculpting Festival, with amazing sculpting competitions, amusements, food, and fireworks. This year’s festival will be held on the weekend of July 20-July 22nd (photo courtesy wiki commons media).

Piping Plovers began arriving at Revere Beach at the same time the GHB PiPl arrived, in late-March and very early April. There are at least half a dozen nesting areas cordoned off for Piping Plovers. Revere has had excellent success with fledging Piping Plover chicks because the PiPl are allowed to establish nests early in the season, without disturbance. From decades of field work, it is known that the earlier the chicks hatch, the greater their chance of survival.

I stopped by to check on the Revere Beach PiPl family on a recent Sunday afternoon; it’s not that out of the way to make it part of my regular routine coming home from Cambridge and Boston jobs. And then stopped at Good Harbor Beach. The difference was astounding. There wasn’t any trash or dog poop on Revere Beach, and there wasn’t a dog anywhere along the five mile stretch of beach. There were however six dogs off leash at Good Harbor Beach within the twenty minutes that I was there to say hello to PiPl monitor Heather and to check on our PiPl parking lot family.

Perhaps you might not think a fair comparison; Revere Beach is much longer than GHB, and it is under the management of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation but I did not see a single DCR employee or officer policing Revere Beach that dog-and-trash-free Sunday afternoon.

Over the past several decades, communities throughout Massachusetts have been learning how to live with Piping Plovers. I am hopeful that the more we learn about the issues confronting the Piping Plovers, the Gloucester community will come together to take the steps to insure their safety and successful nesting. 

There are a great number of helpful signs at Revere Beach.

The triangular-shaped signs that are posted at the PiPl nesting areas are on the small side, only about 8 inches. 

Just like at Nahant Beach (above) many of the roped off areas at Revere Beach have three rows of roping.

At Revere Beach dogs are not allowed on the beach beginning April 1st. The rules are clearly posted at each and every entry to the beach. The signs and poles aren’t fancy and I imagine would be affordable and easy to obtain.

The Gabe and Gabby Family with their leashed dog on the boulevard, sitting next to a PiPl nesting area–no problem for this family to keep their dog off the beach during nesting season.

Plenty of trash barrels.

Some folks are under the false impression that the reason our GHB PiPl are nesting in the parking lot is because when they arrived it was cold and the parking lot hard pack is warm. Factually speaking, Piping Plovers arrived at beaches all along the Massachusetts coastline in mid-March and early April. As far as we know, the Good Harbor Beach PiPl are the Only Piping Plovers nesting in a parking lot.

Male Plover nesting at Revere Beach. The Revere Beach PiPl were creating their nest scrapes on the beach at exactly the same time our GHB PiPl were trying to establish a nest on the beach.

Just like our GHB PiPl family, it looks like there are four eggs in the Revere Beach nest!

Next time I stop to visit the Revere Beach PiPl family, I am going to have to bring home some Kelly’s roast beef sandwiches for dinner. I’ve heard the seafood is pretty good at Kelly’s, too!

EXCITING NEWS AND UPDATES FROM THE ANNISQUAM VILLAGE PLAYERS

Dear Friends of AVP,

AVP is excited to announce our production for 2018 will be The Little Mermaid. The show runs August 7-12, 2018 at 7:00 pm. Tickets will be available on our website, annisquamvillageplayers.com starting in early July.

Our 2018 newsletter is hot off the presses. In it, you’ll find out more about our upcoming production, auditions, our new scholarship program, a feature on longtime AVP set designer Chicki Hollett and plans for the purchase of a new sound system.

We’re looking forward to seeing you this summer!

The Annisquam Village Players

Make a tax-deductible DONATION TO AVP

Annisquam Village Players

YOUNG SWAN UPDATE

The beautiful Young Swan that was recently taken from his home at Niles Pond and deposited in Gloucester Harbor is so far managing to survive.

As he cannot, or will not, fly we do not know how long he can live without drinking fresh water. Lyn is feeding him romaine lettuce daily and he appears to be eating some seaweed, but that is not enough food.

The Young Swan stays tucked in around the seawall by the old Bell House, swimming in circles of only a several hundred feet radius.

If we could only see him maintain a sustained flight!

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