Are you Sicilian or are you Italian?

IMG_4658.JPGSt. Peter’s Fiesta is coming and the Sicilian flag is popping up all over Gloucester. This one is in our neighborhood downtown at Pleasant and Prospect streets. We love our Sicilian pals and neighbors in Gloucester (including the creator of this blog). Our daughter’s birthday party this year included a “Martina,” “two Sofia’s” and a “Maria.” Our son’s been known to wonder why all his buddies have jet black hair except him. Which got me to wondering – are Sicilians really Italian? Through most of history, Sicily wasn’t Italian. It became part of Italy only in 1861. Sicilian peeps – are you Sicilian or Italian?

5 comments

  • I say that we’re Sicilians but consider ourselves Italians.
    I see someone that I more deeply associate with being Sicilian like the Mayor and Lillian Lograsso refer to themselves as both.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I was talking with our friend at soccer and she said her daughter has been taking Italian at the high school but it’s so different from the Sicilian language her grandparents speak that they can’t really communicate. We love listening to the guys talk “Italian” at Caffe Sicilia.

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  • Siciliano

    Liked by 1 person

  • Love tradition that’s what’s it all about (Goomba)…Dave 🙂

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  • Both. All Sicilians are Italians.

    Just like all Texans are Americans.

    But wait, Texas was once part of Mexico!

    And Texans are very provincial, proudly displaying their state flag.

    And Texas has its own culture, lingo, music style. Doesn’t Texas boast that it’s like visiting another country?

    So Sicily, with its own vocabulary, regional cuisine, musical style, is as part of Italy as Texas is of the U.S.

    Only East Coasters would never pose the question to a Texan if he or she identifies as American, correct? It’s a bit rude.

    Because one can be both Sicilian and Italian. Being one doesn’t negate or supersede the other.

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