PIPING PLOVERS HAVE RETURNED TO CAPE ANN BEACHES!

Male Piping Plover

The sweetest and tiniest of shorebirds has been spotted at several of our local beaches, including Wingaersheek and Good Harbor Beach. They have also been seen at Plum Island, as well as other Massachusetts barrier beaches, for several weeks. The Plovers have traveled many thousands of miles to reach our shores and are both weary from traveling and eager to establish nesting sites.

What can you do to help the Piping Plovers? Here are four simple things we can all do to protect the Plovers.

  1. Don’t leave behind or bury trash or food on the beach. All garbage attracts predators such as crows, seagulls, foxes, and coyotes, and all four of these creatures EAT plover eggs and chicks.
  2. Do not linger near the Piping Plovers or their nests. Activity around the Plovers also attracts gulls and crows.
  3. Respect the fenced off areas that are created to protect the Plovers.
  4. If pets are permitted, keep dogs leashed.

 

The last is the most difficult for folks to understand. Dogs threaten Piping Plovers in many ways and at every stage of their life cycle during breeding season, even the most adorable and well-behaved of pooches.

Dogs love to chase Piping Plovers (and other shorebirds) at the water’s edge. After traveling all those thousand of miles, the birds need sustenance. They are at the shoreline to feed to regain their strength.

Dogs love to chase piping Plovers at the wrack line. Here the birds are establishing where to nest. Plovers are skittish at this stage of breeding and will depart the area when disturbed.

Dogs love to chase Piping Plover chicks, which not only terrifies the adult Plovers and distracts them from minding the babies, but the chicks are easily squished by a dog on the run.

Please keep dogs leashed when at the beach. Thank you!

Female Piping Plover

*   *   *

Dave Rimmer, Greenbelt’s director of land stewardship, is giving a lecture about the Piping Plovers at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge on Thursday, April 27th, from 2:00 to 4pm. Preregister by email at: Andrew@ecga.org.

 

6 comments

  • Think we know where to find you for a bit Kim there is something special about being a Guardian and warrior for the cause – keep doing what your heart tells you is right! Dave & Kim

    Liked by 1 person

  • great! ruin another summer

    Like

    • I’m so very sorry you feel that way Anonymous. I wonder if there is anything that we can say to change your mind? The great majority of people in our community loved having the Piping Plovers here and learning how to be good stewards of this beautiful and tiny creature, especially young people. Piping Plover survival is in our hands.

      Only a very small area of Good Harbor Beach was cordoned off last summer. Littering is disgusting and against the law, irregardless of Piping Plovers. Keeping litter and dogs off the beach makes for a safer and cleaner environment for us all. Dogs are not allowed on GHB and Wingaersheek after April 30th, and that too is the law, whether or not a person is concerned about Piping Plovers safety. I hope this convinces you just a little; please feel free to write back with your specific concerns and I will try to address them. Thank you for reading 🙂

      Like

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