Monthly Archives: February 2017

Mayor Romeo Theken Delivers 2017 State of the City Address

Cape Ann Community

2017 State of the City Address

Delivered by Her Honor, Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken

Dear Citizens of Gloucester,

In January of 2015, I took the oath of office to be Gloucester’s Mayor and I promised to represent all of our citizens and to work with you to keep our city moving forward, together. Over the past two years, we have strengthened our city government through honest and transparent policies, meetings and forums.  We have also worked with our state and federal delegations to ensure relief money is received and high value grants are awarded. While we have new businesses helping expand our seasonal tourism, we have also embraced new initiatives designed to benefit our workforce. As we reflect on the efforts this administration has made, I want to assure all of you that the state of our city is strong and our future is brighter now more than ever.

Much…

View original post 1,762 more words

POST FOR GMG FOB DAVE IN RESPONSE TO HIS QUESTION ABOUT WHY THERE WERE NO WILD TURKEYS ON CAPE ANN IN HIS YOUTH

eastern-wild-turkey-male-gloucester-ma-1-copyright-kim-smithGMG Reader Dave wrote recently saying that he did not recall seeing turkeys on Cape Ann when he was growing up. Although the Eastern Wild Turkey is native to Massachusetts, it was rarely seen after 1800 and was completely extirpated by 1851.

The Wild Turkey reintroduction to Massachusetts is a fantastic conservation success story and a tremendous example of why departments of conservation and protection are so vital to our quality of life.

Massachusetts was recently ranked the number one state by U.S. News and World Report and conservation stories like the following are shining examples of just one of the many zillion reasons why (healthcare and education are the top reasons, but conservation IMO is equally as important).

Reposted from the Wild Turkey FAQ page of the office of the Energy and Environmental Affairs website.

“At the time of Colonial settlement, wild turkeys were found nearly throughout Massachusetts. They were probably absent from Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, and perhaps the higher mountain areas in the northwest part of the state. As settlement progressed and land was cleared for buildings and agriculture, turkey populations diminished. By 1800, turkeys were quite rare in Massachusetts, and by 1851 they had disappeared.

Between 1911 and 1967 at least 9 attempts in 5 counties were undertaken to restore turkeys to Massachusetts. Eight failed (probably because of the use of pen-raised stock; and one established a very marginal population which persisted only with supplemental feeding.

In 1972-73, with the cooperation of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, MassWildlife personnel live-trapped 37 turkeys in southwestern New York and released them in Beartown State Forest in southern Berkshire County. By 1976, these birds had successfully established themselves and by 1978 this restoration effort was declared a success.

Beginning in 1978, MassWildlife began live-trapping turkeys from the Berkshires and releasing them in other suitable habitat statewide. Between 1979 and 1996, a total of 26 releases involving 561 turkeys (192 males, 369 females) were made in 10 counties (see the following Table and the accompanying map).

turkey-trans-map

Turkey Transplants within Massachusetts
1979-1996
Location Town County Year Number (Sex)
Hubbardston State Forest Hubbardston Worcester 1979, 1981 22 (10M, 12F)
D.A.R. State Forest Goshen Hampshire 1981-82 14 (6M, 8F)
Mt. Toby State Forest Sunderland Franklin 1982 22 (7M, 15F)
Holyoke Range Granby Hampshire 1982 24 (8M, 16F)
West Brookfield State Forest West Brookfield Worcester 1982-83 24 (12M, 12F)
Miller’s River Wildlife Management Area Athol Worcester 1982-83 24 (11M, 13F)
Koebke Road Dudley Worcester 1983 25 (7M, 18F)
Groton Fire Tower Groton Middlesex 1984 21 (10M, 11F)
Rocky Gutter Wildlife Management Area Middleborough Plymouth 1985-86 25 (12M, 13F)
Bolton Flats Wildlife Management Area Bolton Worcester 1986-87 24 (8M, 16F)
Naushon Island Gosnold Dukes 1987 22 (6M, 16F)
John C. Phillips Wildlife Sanctuary Boxford Essex 1988 21 (9M, 12F)
Fall River-Freetown State Forest Fall River Bristol 1988 24 (11M, 13F)
Baralock Hill Groton Middlesex 1988 16 (5M, 11F)
Camp Edwards Army Base Bourne/Sandwich Barnstable 1989 18 (6M, 12F)
Jones Hill Ashby Middlesex 1990 20 (7M, 13F)
Whittier Hill Sutton Worcester 1990 22 (9M, 13F)
Conant Brook Reservoir Monson Hampden 1991 27 (3M, 24F)
Bradley Palmer State Park Topsfield Essex 1991 18 (1M, 17F)
Hockomock Swamp and Erwin Wilder WMA West Bridgewater Plymouth 1992-93 24 (5M, 19F)
Slade’s Corner Dartmouth Bristol 1993 23 (10M, 13F)
Wendell State Forest Wendell Franklin 1993 19 (4M, 15F)
Facing Rock Wildlife Management Area Ludlow Hampden 1994 8 (1M, 7F)
Peterson Swamp Wildlife Management Area Halifax Plymouth . 1994 26 (11M, 15F)
Cape Cod National Seashore Wellfleet Barnstable 1995-96 28 (5M, 23F)
Terrybrooke Farm Rehoboth Bristol 1996 20 (8M, 12F)
Totals 561; (192M, 369F)

 

By 1996, turkeys were found in Massachusetts about everywhere from Worcester County westward, except in the immediate vicinity of Springfield and Worcester. Good populations are also now found in suitable, but more fragmented, habitats in Bristol, Essex, Middlesex, and Plymouth Counties. On Cape Cod, Barnstable County, turkeys may be found on and near the Massachusetts Military Reservation and the Cape Cod National Seashore. These birds have also moved northward from releases in Plymouth County into southern Norfolk County. On Martha’s Vineyard, wild-strain birds are absent; however, feral pen-raised birds may be found over much of the island. Turkeys are absent from Nantucket and Suffolk Counties. The average statewide fall turkey population is about 18,000-20,000 birds.

Land-use changes have historically influenced the population and distribution of the wild turkey and other wildlife. Such changes will continue to affect the natural environment. For a historical perspective, see the references by Cardoza (1976) and Cronon (1983).”eastern-wild-turkey-males-8-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smith

Congratulations Essex Heritage on a big 20 year anniversary! And about that 2017 Trailblazers ballot? Go KIM SMITH!

Congratulations Essex Heritage on 20 years of leading Essex County by helping us connect, celebrate, and preserve our exceptional cultural and natural resources!

20161007_122443

Essex Heritage hosted Scaling Up! conference at Peabody Essex Museum October 7 2016. I took the group portrait on site intentionally– “Intersections” by ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA “meditation on what is universal in our shared human experience…”   L-R : Annie Harris, Chief Executive Officer, Essex Heritage;  Bob McIntosh, Retired Associate Regional Director, Northeast Region, National Park Service; Stephanie Toothman, Associate Director for Cultural Resources, National Park Services; Brent Mitchell Senior Vice President, QLF/Atlantic Center for the Environment; and Emily Bateson, Coordinator, Practitioners’ Network for Large Landscape Conservation

Essex Heritage established the Essex County Scenic Byway and annual Trails and Sails weekends. They bring stakeholders together as they did with Scaling Up at Peabody Essex Museum. They have partnered, supported and funded dozens of ideas and projects in Essex County including in Gloucester and on Cape Ann. Let’s do something easy that they’re asking in return.

Please help Essex Heritage narrow down that big, big list of worthy Essex County contenders for a special shout out at the 20th Anniversary Gala.  It’s up to us to choose which 4 Trailblazers will get a toast at the Essex Heritage’s milestone 20th Anniversary Gala on April 5, 2017. This idea is a very Essex Heritage thing to do: reflecting on what’s fine and good and sharing it around.

No surprise, I’m going all in Gloucester for this ballot.

Yes, they are all wonderful and deserving nominations, and you’ll recognize favorites throughout the county. BUT this isn’t an everyone gets an award type of deal. You have to narrow it down to one in each category; –  thankfully else Joey might need to add an arts rant 🙂 post.

Here’s the rundown as I see it. For Category 2 “connecting people to place” it has to be Kim Smith. She is a one of a kind and exceptional artist. Kim is inspired by the people, wildlife and the natural world all around us. Right here. We are so, so fortunate that she shares her visual experiences and art every day.

And she has memorably captured nearly ALL of the other nominees in photo or film!

Here’s the crib sheet breakout through a Gloucester lens:

1. Who is the best at Preserving the special region? CHOOSE ONE

Schooner Adventure, Gloucester

Cape Pond Ice, Gloucester

Good job to Cape Ann Trail Stewards, Essex County Greenbelt, Great Marsh Coalition, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge,  Thacher Island Assoc…

2.Who is Best at Connecting People to Place? CHOOSE ONE

Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce

Cape Ann Museum

Discover Gloucester

Gloucester HarborWalk

Schooner Thomas E Lannon

Kim Smith

Stage Fort Visitor Center

Also love Trustees, Ipswich Visitor Center (go Kerrie Bates :)), Rockport Art Association, North of Boston Convention and Visitors, but …go Kim!

3. Who is best at advancing our educational mission? CHOOSE ONE

Maritime Gloucester, Gloucester

Kestrel Education Adventures, Gloucester

3

also love Essex Shipbuilding, Buttonwoods, and Wenham Museum  

 4.Who is the best at Building and growing our future? CHOOSE ONE

Vote YMCA of North shore (includes Gloucester)

also love Peabody Essex Museum, Brooksby Farm, Russell Orchards, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), Essex County Community Foundation,  and Community Preservation 

Read more about it in the Boston Globe David Rattigan article

Read more

The day after Oscars for Manchester by the Sea: Gloucester and Cape Ann shine at MPC MA film and media event at WGBH

Talk about timing! The topics for the fascinating Massachusetts Production Coalition (MPC) event held at WGBH were planned  in advance of any Academy Awards results. After a season of many accolades including the prior evening’s Oscars news, boy did that gathering buzz. Conversations sparked with local names, industry folks, businesses and locales such as: Willow Rest, Pratty’s, local film folks, Gloucester Stage, Israel Horovitz, Kenneth Lonergan, local police, Rt 128, and the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce.

The two featured presentations were Legendary Entertainment’s Matt Marolda on analytics in film, followed by a Meg Montagnino-Jarrett led panel discussion on the making of Manchester by the Sea.

img_20170227_204415

Manchester by the Sea behind the scenes panel discussion led by Meg Montagnino Jarrett, MPC winter event 2017 at WGBH. Projected photograph illustrates jobs on the movie such as the Unit Stills photographer on Manchester by the Sea, Claire Folger

img_20170227_185816

Massachusetts Production Coalition reception at WGBH

img_20170227_203734

wardrobe Manchester by the Sea – requests for Pratty’s t-shirts

 

img_20170227_203015

img_20170227_202619-1

L-R: Meg Montagnino-Jarrett (Film Liaison Cape Ann) facilitated panel: Carolyn Pickman (casting director), Alex Berard (Location Manager) and Kai Quinlan (not pictured/ also Location manager), Ryan Johnson(Lead Man), Joanna Murphy (Asst Costume Designer), Joe Boreland (not pictured)

img_20170227_201405

Matthew Marolda, Legendary Entertainment, presentation at MPC winter 2017 event WGBH Boston

img_20170227_200744

Matthew Marolda from Legendary Entertainment, featured presentation on film and analytics at 2017 MPC winter event held at WGBH

 

img_20170227_194424

Chris O’Donnell MPC update (slide shows Massachusetts Film Set Day at the State House in the Hall of Flags (brought the local movies production jobs to the statehouse)

img_20170227_194229

img_20170227_193820

MPC sponsors, MPC board president opening remarks

Read more

Israel in Egypt at the Gloucester Meeting House

handel

PRESS RELEASE: GLOUCESTER MEETINGHOUSE CONCERT
TITLE: Musica Sacra: George Frederic Handel’s oratorio ‘Israel in Egypt’
WHAT TO EXPECT: The biblical tale of the Exodus inspired Handel to write some of the most dramatic music of his career, depicting the story in vivid detail from the increasingly unpleasant plagues visited upon the Egyptians to the Israelites’ feelings of exultation and triumph in escaping their oppressors. Join Musica Sacra, their professional soloists and Baroque orchestra drawn from Boston’s best for this extraordinary musical journey. For more information and advance tickets please visit http://www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

WHAT’S SPECIAL? One of the largest and most poignant oratorios in the entire Classical repertoire, Handel sets to music the sufferings of the Israelites under Pharaoh’s terrible enslavement and the incredible Biblical story of their symbolic baptism and dash to freedom in the Promised Land through the parted waters of the Red Sea, blessed by a loving God. This is a musical depiction of the most definitive story of God’s power and engagement by hearing the sufferings of his chosen people and directing a leader in Moses to take them out of bondage, using the waters of the Red Sea to drown the hapless Egyptians who give chase. This magnificent oratorio concludes with a hymn of praise to the Almighty for mercy, miraculous power and deliverance as only Handel could conceive.

WHEN: Saturday, March 18th 2017, 7:30pm

WHERE: The historic 1806 Gloucester Meetinghouse (home of the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church), corner of Church & Middle Street.

ADMISSION (at the door or on-line at http://www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org):
$60 Preferred VIP Seating (reserved front rows & rear gallery)
$35 General
$25 College Students & Seniors (65+)
Under 17 free

PERFORMERS: From a choral repertoire spanning five centuries, Musica Sacra performs works both familiar and rare, with a crisp passion that awakens the listener to yearnings and joys, sorrows and delights—all that defines and inspires the best in human lives. In March 2015 the group performed J.S. Bach’s great Mass in B-minor at the Gloucester Meetinghouse to high acclaim.

Since 1959, Musica Sacra has been performing choral music with the highest standards of musical excellence and a sound that has been called “gifted,” “breathtaking,” and “uncommonly fresh and direct.” Director Mary Beekman, now in her 30th season, continues to thrill Musica Sacra’s singers and audiences with a varied and engaging repertoire.

The group has performed at the invitation of institutions such as the Boston Early Music Festival; WGBH Radio; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Fogg Art Museum of Harvard University. In 2003, Musica Sacra released their much-anticipated studio recording, Love, Lust, and Laudations: Flemish Choral Music of the High Renaissance. In 2004, Musica Sacra premièred Boston composer Daniel Pinkham’s Magnificat for chorus, soprano and wind quintet—a new work written especially for Mary Beekman and Musica Sacra.

SPECIAL MUSICIANS: Soloists are among Boston’s most acclaimed vocal artists:
Barbara Allen Hill, Soprano
Caroline R. Olsen, Mezzo-Soprano
Ian Pomerantz, Bass-Baritone
Janet Ross, Soprano
Jonas Budris, Tenor
Ulysses Thomas, Bass-Baritone
They will be joined by a large Baroque orchestra including strings, brass, woodwinds, timpani and organ continuo, as specified by Handel, drawn from New England’s finest players.

SPONSORSHIP: This Oratorio Series concert is made possible by our generous donors: J.J. & Jackie Bell, H. Woody Brock, Phil & Eve Cutter, Alec Dingee & Susan Gray, Charles Nazarian, and sole corporate sponsor, the Cape Ann Savings Bank. Additional sponsorships remain available. If you would like to be a donor in support of this annual Oratorio Series event please see our website for details:
http://www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

ACCESSIBILITY: Persons with disabilities may enter from the 10 Church Street side entrance where there is an attendant and an elevator to the Meetinghouse sanctuary level.

AFTERWARDS: There will be a gala reception downstairs in the Vestry after the performance to which the entire audience is invited to meet the performers.

MORE INFORMATION EVENT CONTACT:
Charles Nazarian, president
Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation
10 Church Street
Gloucester, MA 01930
978-821-5291
chasnaz@gmail.com
http://www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

MUSICIANS’ CONTACT:
Anne Riesenfeld
Executive Director
Musica Sacra
P O Box 381336
Cambridge, MA 02238
(617) 349-3400
ariesenfeld@musicasacra.org
http://www.musicasacra.org

YOU’RE DEAD TO ME

On Monday’s podcast we were wondering about from where the expression “you’re dead to me” originated. Andrea Holbrook, the Gloucester Daily Times managing editor, enlightens 🙂

Godfather 2: Michael Corleone: Fredo, you’re nothing to me now. You’re not a brother, you’re not a friend. I don’t want to know you or what you do. I don’t want to see you at the hotels, I don’t want you near my house. When you see our mother, I want to know a day in advance, so I won’t be there. You understand?

But it was in Zoolander.

Thank you Andrea!

www.goodmorninggloucester.com Manchester-By-The-Sea Movie Local Production Photos and Coverage posts from While They were Filming here

Review: Just ahead of its theater release, Hollywood premiere in Beverly for Manchester by the Sea

Lots Of Local Scenes In The Trailer For Manchester-By-The Sea The Movie

Live From Production Of Manchester-By-The-Sea Starring Casey Affleck In #GloucesterMA

BREAKING NEWS! Filming on East Main Street Beacon Marine MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA MOVIE Tonight!

Manchester By The Sea Movie

Wake up by 9AM on Sunday to get the scoop on Matt Damon’s “Manchester By The Sea” movie filming

Quick Trip to the State Fish Pier

A couple of friends from Beverly came up the other day to go to the Beauport Hotel and then the Seaport Grille at the Cruiseport.  The plan was to drive around a bit to take some scenic photos and then grab some drinks and dinner.  Unfortunately, it was super foggy that afternoon so photo opportunities were not readily there for the taking. Luckily, both the indoor and outdoor fires were blazing at the Beauport and the flatbread pizza and drinks were still yummy.  After relaxing and catching up a little on one of the cozy leather sofas, we drove over to the Seaport Grille to meet another friend for dinner.  I had my favorite veggie panini….which never disappoints.

#GloucesterMa Mayor @STheken leading the #GloucesterFresh demo of locally caught #hake at #NEFS

Sawyer Free Library,Week of February 27, 2017

SawyerFreeLibrary

WEDNESDAY DELAYED OPENING

Due to a staff development meeting the Library will open at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, March 1st. Toddler Time will begin at its normal 10 a.m. start time. Thank you for your understand and sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

Books & Brews Book Club

Tuesday, February 28 from 6-8 p.m. at the Azorean Restaurant, the Books & Brews Book Club will meet to discuss this month’s read, Jodi Picoult’s The Storyteller.  Enjoy an evening out meeting new friends, good discussion, and treat yourself to a beverage and appetizers. Bring your ideas for books for the coming year. 

Tax Assistance

Volunteers from AARP Foundation Tax-Aide will be at the Sawyer Free Library every Wednesday through April 12 from 12:30-3:30 p.m.  They offer free tax preparation particularly for those over 50 or who can’t afford their own tax preparation. Space is limited and goes fast…

View original post 28 more words

USDA Wildlife Services conducting a crow roost dispersal Mon – Weds

Cape Ann Community

USDA Wildlife Services (WS) will be conducting a crow roost dispersal at 128 Rogers Street, Gloucester, MA on February 27th – March 2nd 2017.  This is a non-lethal technique that will require the use of pyrotechnics.  Pyrotechnics have a very similar sound to “bottle rockets” or similar fireworks.  With this comes the inherent risk of many noise complaints and although we do not foresee it happening, an increased fire risk.  WS staff will begin dispersing crows at approximately 17:00 (or earlier if they show up then) on Monday and will continue after sunset or until the last crow comes into the area.  Dispersals are most successful when they are conducted numerous days in a row and that is why we have planned the dispersal for four (4) days.  There is the possibility it does not require all of the days, but we have to prep in case it…

View original post 110 more words

Gloucestercast 220 With Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 2/27/17

gloucestercastsquare11-1

Gloucestercast 220 With Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 2/27/17


podcasticon1

When you subscribe you need to verify your email address so they know we’re not sending you spam and that you want to receive the podcast.  So once you subscribe check your email for that verification.  if you don’t see it, check your spam folder in your email acct.

subscribebutton

Oscars- Kate says she hates award shows.  I love watching them.  Although swearing that she hates them she was riveted to the pre-show.  Then we turned it off and missed this
Oscar fashion Joey Gives thumbs up to Taraji P. Henson and Hailee Steinfeld
Kudos To Meg Montagnino for her work involved with the Filming of Manchester-By-the Sea
Rosie is sick
Pier 23 Kitchen
David Joyner named executive editor for North of Boston Media Group.  Shout out to Andrea Holbrook and Gail McCarthy
Turkey Watch Good Harbor Beach Marsh

TURKEY BROMANCE

eastern-wild-turkey-males-gloucester-ma-6-copyright-kim-smithConferring

From far across the marsh, large brown moving shapes were spotted. I just had to pull over to investigate and was happily surprised to see a flock of perhaps a dozen male turkeys all puffed up and struttin’ their stuff. I headed over to the opposite side of the marsh in hopes of getting a closer look at what was going on.

eastern-wild-turkey-female-foraging-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smith

Turkey hen foraging 

Found along the edge, where the marsh met the woodlands, were the objects of desire. A flock of approximately an equal number of hens were foraging for insects and vegetation in the sun-warmed moist earth.

eastern-wild-turkey-males-3-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smith

Males begin exhibiting mating behavior as early as late February and courtship was full underway on this unusually warm February morning. The funny thing was, the toms were not fighting over the hens, as you might imagine. Instead the males seemed to be paired off, bonded to each other and working together, strategically placing themselves in close proximity to the females. A series of gobbles and calls from the males closest to the females set off a chain reaction of calls to the toms less close. The last to respond were the toms furthest away from the females, the ones still in the marsh. It was utterly fascinating to watch and I tried to get as much footage as possible while standing as stone still for as long as is humanly possible.eastern-wild-turkey-males-gloucester-marsh-copyright-kim-smith

With much curiosity, and as soon as a spare moment was found, I read several interesting articles on the complex social behavior of Wild Turkeys and it is true, the males were bromancing, as much as they were romancing.

Ninety percent of all birds form some sort of male-female bond. From my reading I learned that Wild Turkeys do not. The females nest and care for the poults entirely on her own. The dominant male in a pair, and the less dominant of the two, will mate with the same female. Wild Turkey male bonding had been observed for some time however, the female can hold sperm for up to fifty days, so without DNA testing it was difficult to know who was the parent of her offspring. DNA tests show that the eggs are often fertilized by more than one male. This behavior insures greater genetic diversity. And it has been shown that bromancing males produce a proportionately greater number of offspring than males that court on their own. Poult mortality is extremely high. The Wild Turkey bromance mating strategy produces a greater number of young and is nature’s way of insuring future generations.

The snood is the cone shaped bump on the crown of the tom’s head (see below).eastern-wild-turkey-male-snood-caruncles-gloucester-ma-2-copyright-kim-smith

The wattle (or dewlap) is the flap of skin under the beak. Caruncles are the wart-like bumps covering the tom’s head. What are referred to as the “major” caruncles are the large growths that lie beneath the wattle. When passions are aroused, the caruncles become engorged, turning brilliant red, and the snood is extended. The snood can grow twelve inches in a matter of moments. In the first photo below you can see the snood draped over the beak and in the second, a tom with an even longer snood.

eastern-wild-turkey-male-close-up-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithIt’s all in the snood, the longer the snood, the more attractive the female finds the male.

eastern-wild-turkey-male-snood-extended-carnuckle-gloucester-ma-10-copyright-kim-smith

eastern-wild-turkey-male-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smitheastern-wild-turkey-male-gloucester-ma-9-copyright-kim-smithMale Turkey not puffed up and snood retracted.

A young male turkey is called a jake and its beard is usually not longer than a few inches. The longer the beard, generally speaking, the older the turkey.eastern-wild-turkey-male-beard-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithMale Wild Turkey, with beard and leg spurs.eastern-wild-turkey-males-snood-extended-retracted-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smith

Male Wild Turkeys with snood extended (foreground) and snood retracted (background).

eastern-wild-turkey-male-tail-feathers-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithWhen the butt end is prettier than the face

8643866_orig

 

In case you are unsure on how to tell the difference between male (called tom or gobbler) and female (hen), compare the top two photos. The tom has a snood, large caruncles, carunculate (bumpy) skin around the face, and a pronounced beard. The hen does not. Gobblers also have sharp spurs on the back of their legs and hens do not.

 

turkeycharacteristics

Read more here:

http://www.alankrakauer.org/?p=1108

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/03/02_turkeys.shtml

http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/wild-turkey-faq.html

A GLORIOUS GOOD MORNING GLOUCESTER TO YOU!

Brought to you by Mr. Swan –

We’re happy to see our buddy surviving the winter without too much ado (except when he got himself frozen solidly into the ice).

A friendly note to folks who would like to visit Mr. Swan. He is very shy around dogs so perhaps leave your furry companion in the car. And if you plan to feed him, please, please only whole corn or shredded veggies (swans don’t have teeth, so no large chunks). Junk food is a killer and weakens their bones.

mr-swan-mute-swan-cygnus-olor-copyright-kim-smithMr. Swan doing his morning exercises.

« Older Entries