43 comments

  • Wonderful,eerie, dramatic photos.

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  • These are beautiful photos. Would the photographer give me permission to use them for a reference photo to paint?

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  • Tremendous capture and so interesting to see!

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  • If you covered up the top 1/3 of the first photo with your hand, it looks like the coyotes are coming down a mountain out West. Great shot!

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  • Wild! Just showed this to the kids. They thought it was very cool. So do I! Great shots!

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  • Gorgeous photos! I see them out by the greenbelt on Farrington Ave. now and then. They really are beautiful creatures.

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  • indeed special photographs, yet heart wrenching when your year old golden retriever has been missing for 3 weeks after last being seen at his home on stewart avenue. i would ask if the photographer could be more specific about the location. we have spent hours snowshoeing/hiking/walking eastern point and seine field and the marble conservation area as we want to bring our LOKI home regardless of the circumstance. any and all help appreciated. thank you. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Looking-for-Loki-Lost-Golden-Retriever/958553077502129?ref=hl

    Liked by 1 person

    • I thought of all those who are searching for lost pets as soon as I saw these photographs. Beautiful photographs. Very worrisome.

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    • Suesan, as a dog lover and owner I am sorry for your loss but have you considered that coyotes may not be responsible. Loose dogs can be stolen, hit by cars, become lost or even attacked by other dogs. I hope you find your dog but it may be unfair to blame coyotes.

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      • Oh sure, maybe… kinda like ISIS is really just an unruly crew that needs a job… I agree, just beautiful pictures…. now lets go take a few of them out for trespassing.

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      • Louise, although we know tens of thousands of people are Looking for Loki we have had zero confirmed sightings. That a pack of coyotes may be involved is just one of the many scenarios we play in our head. I have nothing against coyotes, they are part of our lives here in East Gloucester and Loki witnessed them in his yard numerous times. We would like to find Loki.The more awareness we can bring to his plight the better. There is a vast gulf between the experience of loving and having a dog and having your dog disappear. Please consider this before you assume you understand our situation and all we are doing to resolve it.

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    • They roaming around Brace Cove and Niles Pond, I ve seen them the last couple of days there, even early afternoon when i walk my dogs.

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  • Hoping both LOKI and OPIE are some where SAFE??? This photo is scary to me…I know we have coyotes here, but to see them in a pack roaming in daylight is creepy…..

    Liked by 2 people

  • eileenpattenoliver

    Amazing photos! I, too, would love to do a painting of that first one with the huge wave, with the photographer’s permission.

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  • Yes, I think these are beautiful photographs, but it’s a little unnerving that there are 5 coyotes in one of the pictures….I’ve heard them howling off Farrington, they are no doubt housed up in the open-yet protected-field. My heart goes out to the dog owners as well. I’ve been in their shoes and it’s heartwrenching.

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  • fantastic pictures of what sometimes seems like a secret community

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  • Hey, I hate to be the wet blanket here, but the word “Photoshop” blazes like a neon sign in my head when I see these photos. I’ll quote Fred Bodin (but take responsibility for using the words): “If you covered up the top 1/3 of the first photo with your hand, it looks like the coyotes are coming down a mountain out West.” Too true. What would any coyote be doing out there in those conditions, anyway? Examine the “transition” between the ocean/surf/rocks part of the first and third pictures: the light and perspective are wrong. And if I’m wrong, I apologize in advance, but….

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    • You’re wrong. If you knew Sherman Morss you’d know he’s an older gentleman with a ton of integrity.

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    • I can certainly testify that these were grab shots taken from the balcony of my house on Eastern Point. Thanks Joey.
      Sherman “Pat” Morss, Jr.

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      • Mr. Morss, I don’t know if this is a private letter, but regardless, I did not mean to say anything that would be taken as an insult or a stain on your integrity. I thought that someone was fooling around with Photoshop, with no intent apart from fun. I grew up in Annisquam, and used to go to Eastern Point for summer dances, but I haven’t been there since then. I couldn’t imagine a spot from which one might have the perspective shown in your photos. Please accept my apology.
        Sincerely, Bill Langer

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    • As resident skeptical kermudgin I must also say these are obviously genuine. I hate shopped images, these aren’t. Just a really lucky moment.

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  • Great Photos

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  • Excellent capture here and they are all together – in the conditions they are quite adaptable and you can learn so much by watching them! The howling wind, the bubbling brook, the shrieking magpie all suggest, in their vital immediacy, stories out of which legends are created. Mother Nature you cannot control.

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  • Thank you , Pat, for sharing your talent and for showing us Nature, beautiful but implacable.
    Wish I could give you the sound track to match the photos, I hear it almost every night on the golf course…..maybe a different pack ?

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    • Thanks Solange. We have our own sound track out here. While shoveling snow a few days ago the pack responded with a great howl to a fire engine siren across the harbor. Pat

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  • Wow! Fantastic pictures. What are they looking for?

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  • Well, as I said, if I’m wrong, I apologize. I didn’t mean to impugn anyone’s integrity, and they are indeed very cool photos.

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  • I would guess they are looking for seals. Last winter my son and I came across the remains of a large seal up on St. Louis Ave. Apparently they were able to drag it all the way up there.

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  • Absolutely amazing, astonishing photos! I would love to have seen that in person.

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    • You can see these anytime you’d like along Farrington, Ave and in the Seine Field. They are getting to be quite a problem. Where we use to see one or two a year… not there are several that hang out all the time. Solange… stop feeding them!

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  • In one of her posts Kim mentioned that coyotes like to den on south facing slopes. If you take a look at a map of Cape Ann this spot in between Eastern Point Lighthouse and Brace Rock is the perfect spot. Gentle slope all southern exposure down to the shore, plenty of impenetrable brush and cat briar if you are a biped.

    If I was a coywolf alpha dog I would den in the brush on the south facing slope just north of this photo on over to the seminary and Brace Cove. Coywolves are omnivores and I bet the are looking for seafood. They know a washed up lobster or crab as well as an injured seal would be mighty tasty. Offshore birds also get blown in and land on shore. They never come into land so they cannot take off. Another tasty treat.

    Anyone notice that the seal population is going up but the number of dead seals on the beach is still pretty low? The coywolf is the DPW of the beach removing stinky stuff before we even see it.

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  • Forgot to mention, amazing photo. The one other thing they might be doing is just getting out of the den before they go nutty like the rest of us. But they do not have snow shovels so they stick to the hard pack along the shore where the saltwater has crusted the snow with rime. Much easier walking then the snow pack covering the rest of the Cape.

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  • Please don’t divulge the whereabouts of any coyotes.

    There are so many people that want to kill them.

    A few of the comments here are disturbing in that they reflect the erroneous beliefs by so many. Coyotes live in packs, they are rarely seen during the day because they have been so persecuted that they are evolving to become nocturnal. That is a pretty sad thing to ponder, we humans make life so miserable and fearful for a species that they rarely venture out during day, and when they do as in these extreme circumstances when few humans are out some consider it disturbing!

    I see it the other way around, it is disturbing to fear wildlife without good reason. A few notes, most if not all bad wildlife encounters can be avoided by being good neighbors. Don’t assume that wildlife know boundaries, they don’t. They don’t understand that your dog or cat is not food. Cats should never be left out alone. They kill millions of birds and small mammals and are extremely destructive. If that were not good enough reason to contain cats, leaving them out allows them to be preyed on by dogs, wild animals, hit by cars or tormented by abusive people. Any of these fates await cats left outdoors. But its just plain inconsiderate and environmentally unconscionable to let cats roam. Dogs too should be under supervision of their owners. Don’t leave food out, don’t leave pets unattended and remember we share our earth with some amazing creatures. Its unreasonable to expect all other beings to go somewhere else.

    Thanks for your amazing images. These coyotes are just trying to make a living like all of us.

    Some facts to consider. Coyotes in NE are more rightly called coywolves because they are a genetic mix of the western coyote and now rare red wolf. Coywolves mostly eat small rodents and help to keep down lyme disease as they eat white footed mice that carry lyme. They are monogamous and mate for life. Both parents help to rear the young. If unmolested they live in small packs. They are easily frightened by people. The instances of coyotes attacking people are extremely rare, I can think of one fatal attack in North America and the woman was small and running with headphones on. The animals might have perceived her as prey. The extremely rare attacks on humans or pets are usually due to rabies or habituated animals, or because their pups are in danger or dogs are left out. Dogs attack, kill and maim many people each year. Coyotes have rarely caused harm to humans over hundreds of years. Coyotes do not overpopulate. In fact, they regulate their populations because they are territorial. The scientific concept is called territoriality. They also limit their reproduction due to availability of prey and habitat.

    There is much fear mongering that is promoted when it comes to coyotes. I hope you will rise above it and appreciate being able to see such a magnificent species living among you.

    For those of you interested in learning about coyotes I encourage you to visit Project Coyote http://www.projectcoyote.org/
    for those interested in learning about why coyotes deserve protection please visit my site Coyote and Wild Predators Need Protection https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=coyotes%20and%20wild%20predators%20need%20protection

    For those interested in learning about the Carnivore Conservation and the need to reform wildlife management to protect carnivores, Act please visit
    http://www.carnivoreconservationact.com/

    Thank you again for your wonderful images. Please be respectful of coyotes and do not divulge their habits or areas of living and traveling.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Pat Morss.s photos are excellent. Coyotes live among us here on Eastern Point, Farrington Avenue, The Seine fields, the moors of bass rocks. Frequent sightings like this alarm us less and less, as we learn to live in harmony. My experience with coyotes has been they retreat willingly, to their own habitat, non confrontational, intent on survival, as we humans sprawl our habitat, squeezing theirs. We are all creatures of mother’s earth and must be willing to learn to share it. Live and let live. .
    .

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  • Gone fishing, heh. Thank you so much for these photos!

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  • Your photos are extraordinary…….having grown up in East Gloucester and having been here my entire 55 years I have NEVER experienced seeing one coyote let alone 7 or 8….UNTIL the past few years. In fact, East Gloucester has become quite the breeding ground for them and they are often seen in the daytime even BEFORE this year’s snowfall. As much as I LOVE animals and creatures of all kinds…we HAVE A PROBLEM. They have become very bold and it won’t be long before a child will be in harms way….

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  • We are responsible for our pets, dogs, cats, birds , et al, as we chose to have them live with us. We must be happy that people like Pat make it possible to admire ,appreciate and respect the few wild animals we have not yet driven to extinction..there is no need for fear, but there is for common sense , respect and understanding of Nature .

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  • Pingback: Coyote Pack in a Snowstorm | havanahyde

  • How long have they been on the island?

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