What is this Creature??

We found this on our tomatoe plant tonight.  Does anyone know what this is?? Pictures by the zip line kid using his phone.

About Vickie & Peter

Vickie grew up in Iowa. Lived in Silicon Valley & NYC. Peter has lived all over (NJ, NY, CH, IN, CA, MA, etc.) We chose to live and raise our family in Gloucester. Owners of gimmesound.com & Van Ness Group. Producers of gimmeLIVE concerts.
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15 Responses to What is this Creature??

  1. Tomato Hornworm with Braconid Wasp infestation.

  2. James says:

    I believe it’s a horn worm, I’m certain that it’s covered with the eggs of a parasitic wasp.

  3. Robyn says:

    Oh No you have them, think they are called tomatoe horn worms lol you have to pick them off and put them in a soulution to KILL them they will eat your whole plant …looks like larve on there backs KILL them ….

  4. Dana says:

    That’s called a tomato hornworm or sometimes just called a tomato worm. It isn’t really a worm, it is a caterpillar.

  5. Kathleen Henneberry says:

    Tomato hornworm hosting and parastized by braconid wasp larvae.The wasp is good for tomato plants, so good to let them develop, then they will get rid of your hornworms (not good for tomato plants) which die in the process.

  6. debny01930 says:

    White flies…make a dish soap mixture with water, put it in a spray bottle and send them to where ever it is white flies go when they die.

  7. From what I can tell mother nature is saving the day. That’s a Tomato Hornworm that wants to chow down on your tomatoes. Braconoid Wasps laid eggs all over the thing. The baby wasps will eat the worm as they grow. Boom! Pest control. Another reason to avoid pesticides. Ma nature has a plan.

  8. Kim Smith says:

    Hello VanNess Family,

    The green part is the caterpillar of the Tomato Hornworm Moth. The white “eggs” are actually the spun cocoons of the Braconid wasp family. The female wasp bores holes into the caterpillar and deposits her eggs, inside the caterpillar. The eggs hatch and feed, inside the caterpillar. The maggots grow within the caterpillar, emerge, and then spin their cocoons on the surface of the caterpillar. The adult wasps emerge from the cocoons.

    See cool video with great time lapse photography Honworm meets Alien

  9. Sem Sutter says:

    It is the larva (caterpillar) of a tomato hornworm. The white things are cocoons of a wasp that is a parasite on the worm. See the explanation here: http://www.vegedge.umn.edu/vegpest/hornworm.htm

  10. Susan says:

    Tomato Hornworm with eggs layed on it by a parasitic wasp. It will die slowly as the wasps larva eat it.

  11. I believe that is a tomato horn worm, covered with parasitic larvae from a braconid wasp. You can find a photo just like yours – with an explanation – here.

  12. Anonymous says:

    Tomato Hornworm. Unfortunately they destroy the plants. :(

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/M1224.html

  13. Kim Smith says:

    Hello VanNess Family,

    The green part is the caterpillar of the Tomato Hornworm Moth. The white “eggs” are actually the spun cocoons of the Braconid wasp family. The female wasp bores holes into the caterpillar and deposits her eggs, inside the caterpillar. The eggs hatch and feed, inside the caterpillar. The maggots grow within the caterpillar, emerge, and then spin their cocoons on the surface of the caterpillar. The adult wasps emerge from the cocoons.

    See cool video with great time lapse photography Honworm meets Alien

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