Tag Archives: Whiting

Merluzzi- If the old timers were still alive they’d be having a field day.

Guys like Mickey Red, Leo The Flounder, they’d be going crazy for the whiting that’s been coming in.  Fried, in a broodu, you name it- Whiting, my favorite fish to eat.

Let the Menagani Babu eat 30 day old swordfish, I’ll eat a mess of fried whiting any day over that crap.

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When we were in Ravello, Italy we saw the Merluzzi at a Farmer’s Market. Same fish in the Mediterranean that we’re landing here in Gloucester.

Gloucester Seafood Display Auction- Grey Sole

Here’s some grey sole at the Gloucester Seafood Display Auction.

Within the first couple of years with my wife we were sitting at her parents house and somehow the topic of fish came up.  My mother in law told me she didn’t like flounder, but she loved sole.  I told her that sole is a flounder.  There’s a lot of people who don’t really know their fish.  I must admit as much fish as I’ve eaten in my lifetime if someone fried a fresh haddock or a cod fillet I’d have a hard time distinguishing the difference (and I’ve eaten tons).
My personal favorite types of fish in order of preference- fried whiting, baked haddock with the breadcrumbs, raw tuna, fried grey sole or yellowtail flounder, sockeye salmon.
Favorite shellfish- The Mrs’ Lobsterolls, steamed lobster with bernaise dipping sauce, baked stuffed littlenecks with my mothers’ stuffing recipe, Mexican Campeche brand shrimp with cocktail sauce, fried clams, mussels fra diavolo (extra spicy).
Look for part two of the video from the Gloucester Seafood Display Auction at 8AM

Whiting Up Close and Personal

Whiting looks almost prehistoric, straight out of Jurassic Park.

It happens to be my very favorite fish to eat. Headed and scaled and fried up.  The flaky white meat falls right off its bone and you eat it like smelt, as if you were eating corn on the cob.

Whiting Up Close and Personal, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

This fish was a big part of our family’s business where many local people were employed.  With the big increases in water and sewer rates, it just didn’t make financial sense to process fish in Gloucester so we started shipping the whiting to New York back in the eighties and nineties.