Tag Archives: ten hours untill dawn

Blizzard of ’78 36th Anniversary the Pilot Boat “Can Do”

The “Can Do”

cando

These Photos of the “Grampus” in Beverly Harbor are from 2009 .

The Grampus is the old pilot boat “Can Do” that was lost with all hands (crew of five) in the Blizzard of ’78 .

The Damaged Hull was the only thing left of the Can Do when it was later raised from the sea.

The Workboat Grampus previously the pilot boat Can Do was raised in 1981 and after a complete re-build was returned to service. She has served on numerous projects over the years. The name Grampus (the original name of the vessel) is an old term for a pilot whale, appropriate for the sleek black hull of the vessel. Grampus is 47ft long and is powered by an 855 Cummins diesel. She was originally built as a yacht, and travelling as far south as the Amazon.

Inspite of what some have said she is not haunted or is she?

Thanks go out to MuffyHowards from Cape Ann Online for the heads up on these Youtube Videos. The Story of the Gloucester Pilot Boat Can Do. It’s a long series at least 13 parts. You’ll hear actuall Radio Transmisions from the USCG and the Pilot Boat Can do during this Tragedy.

From Publishers Weekly;

“Before The Perfect Storm, there was the 1978 blizzard that lashed the Massachusetts coast with blinding snow, 90-mile-per-hour winds and 40-foot waves. Into the juggernaut sailed the small boat Can Do and its crew of five civilians on a doomed mission to assist two other vessels imperiled by the storm. As in The Perfect Storm, all hands were lost; but since the Can Do sank only a few agonizing miles from shore, there are records of terse radio transmissions to help the author recreate their last desperate hours. Journalist Tougias (The Blizzard of ’78) fills out his absorbing account with lots of search-and-rescue procedural details, recollections from others who endured the monstrous seas of that hellish night and 300 years’ worth of maritime disaster sagas. At times, the book feels padded with lengthy, adulatory back stories about the Can Do crew and needless speculations (i.e., “Kenny Fuller likely thought of his wife, knowing that if he died it would be especially hard on her”). And the story’s outcome-the Can Do never got anywhere near the boats it went to help, both of which survived the storm-raises questions about the wisdom of the heroic ethos it celebrates. Still, Tougias delivers a well-researched, vividly written tale of brave men overwhelmed by the awesome forces of nature.”

Also if your interested in this story Check out the book: “Ten Hours Until’ Dawn”

By Micheal Tougias

http://www.amazon.com/Ten-Hours-Until-Dawn-Heroism/dp/0312334362/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297130348&sr=1-1