Tag Archives: science

“Top Secret Science” at St. Ann School

On Friday Feb. 2, Michael Bergen of “Top Secret Science and Math” came to do some activities with the students of St. Ann School.  I’m not sure who had more fun, he or the kids!  I stopped in to take some photos and to see what he would do (I love hands-on science stuff…).  I couldn’t stay long, but I got some shots that show how much fun everyone was having – the kids making rubber balls from water and powdery crystals, and Michael Bergen throwing fire from his hands…

 

 

- Fr. Matthew Green

Movie – “Ice People”

ice_people_photoICE PEOPLE
The Cape Ann Community Cinema
(at Gloucester Stage)
267 East Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930
978/282-1988
*SHOWTIMES:
Thursday 2/26 @ 7:15pm; Friday 2/27 @ 5:00pm; Saturday 2/28; March 1 @ 2:45pm & 5:00pm

Unique in the genre of exploration and adventure films, “Ice People” takes you on one of the earth’s most seductive journeys -Antarctica. Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Anne Aghion spent four months “on the ice” with modern-day polar explorers, to find out what drives dedicated researchers to leave the world behind in pursuit of science, and to capture the true experience of living and working in this extreme environment. And, as it turns out, the film also witnesses one of the most significant discoveries about climate change in recent Antarctic science.

Intense public focus on climate change has turned the shores of Antarctica into a new tourist mecca, making the earth’s coldest continent the hot place to be. But, inland from the penguins and ice floes is a magical Antarctica of volcanoes, boulder-strewn valleys and ominous glaciers. Only a small number of scientific research teams get there, braving severe conditions to learn about our planet’s history, and make predictions about our future.

“Ice People” heads out into the “deep field” with noted geologists Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis, and two undergrad scientists-in-the-making, where they scour across hundreds of miles to find tiny, critical signs of ancient life. Their findings would give the first evidence of a green Antarctica over 14 million years ago, that disappeared with a sudden shift in the temperature of the continent.

The most authentic film about life on the ice since the trailblazing expeditions to Antarctica chronicled nearly a century ago, “Ice People” conveys the vast beauty, the claustrophobia, the excitement and the stillness of an experience set to nature’s rhythm.

“An intriguing slice-of-life that observes the area’s staggeringly beautiful and imposing landscapes and the unique challenges experienced by those who work there.” -Dennis Harvey, Variety

“Documentary filmmaker Anne Aghion follows research geologists… as they pick their way across Antarctica’s interior dry valleys, eventually discovering – in front of Aghion’s camera! -plant and animal fossils that prove the ice shelf at the bottom of the world was once green… Highly recommended!” -Jennifer Merin, About.com

“I have seen hundreds of science films, and ‘Ice People’ is unique in the way it portrays what it’s really like to do field science. Also, this is some of the best cinematography I’ve ever seen of the Dry Valleys—it’s the first time anyone has captured in motion picture the ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ feel of Antarctica.” -Tom Wagner, Program Director for Antarctic Earth Sciences, U.S. National Science Foundation Office of Polar Program

Unique in the genre of exploration and adventure films, “Ice People” takes you on one of the earth’s most seductive journeys -Antarctica. Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Anne Aghion spent four months “on the ice” with modern-day polar explorers, to find out what drives dedicated researchers to leave the world behind in pursuit of science, and to capture the true experience of living and working in this extreme environment. And, as it turns out, the film also witnesses one of the most significant discoveries about climate change in recent Antarctic science.

Intense public focus on climate change has turned the shores of Antarctica into a new tourist mecca, making the earth’s coldest continent the hot place to be. But, inland from the penguins and ice floes is a magical Antarctica of volcanoes, boulder-strewn valleys and ominous glaciers. Only a small number of scientific research teams get there, braving severe conditions to learn about our planet’s history, and make predictions about our future.

“Ice People” heads out into the “deep field” with noted geologists Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis, and two undergrad scientists-in-the-making, where they scour across hundreds of miles to find tiny, critical signs of ancient life. Their findings would give the first evidence of a green Antarctica over 14 million years ago, that disappeared with a sudden shift in the temperature of the continent.

The most authentic film about life on the ice since the trailblazing expeditions to Antarctica chronicled nearly a century ago, “Ice People” conveys the vast beauty, the claustrophobia, the excitement and the stillness of an experience set to nature’s rhythm.

“An intriguing slice-of-life that observes the area’s staggeringly beautiful and imposing landscapes and the unique challenges experienced by those who work there.” -Dennis Harvey, Variety

“Documentary filmmaker Anne Aghion follows research geologists… as they pick their way across Antarctica’s interior dry valleys, eventually discovering – in front of Aghion’s camera! -plant and animal fossils that prove the ice shelf at the bottom of the world was once green… Highly recommended!” -Jennifer Merin, About.com

“I have seen hundreds of science films, and ‘Ice People’ is unique in the way it portrays what it’s really like to do field science. Also, this is some of the best cinematography I’ve ever seen of the Dry Valleys—it’s the first time anyone has captured in motion picture the ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ feel of Antarctica.” -Tom Wagner, Program Director for Antarctic Earth Sciences, U.S. National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs