Tag Archives: Schooner

First sighting of REDBIRD

Hi Joey ___

REDBIRD’s long migration from San Francisco via Portsmouth, VA is now complete.  She is now a year-round resident of Cape Ann.  This beautiful schooner had been kept in the builder’s family until Daisy Nell and Captain Stan brought her to town for the first time last Saturday.

Welcome!

Al Bezanson

GREEN DRAGON

Redbird arrives in Gloucester

Schooner Tesha Eight Years in the Making

Thomas Burnett and crew stopped at Sugar Magnolia for breakfast during their visit in Gloucester, they are on a trek from Halifax NV to Corpus Christi Texas. Check out their website for the eight years in the making http://www.schoonertesha.net/ also Twitter https://twitter.com/schoonertesha/media

The SV Tesha is anchored off Ten Pound Island.

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Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

Continuing with ” reruns” while in Mexico, the Parade of Sails is another favorite event. So looking forward to this year’s Schooner Festival!

See original post on GMG, September 2, 2013:

Video: Time Lapse Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 – Program: The Building of the Thomas E. Lannon, Presented by: Captain Tom Ellis

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Visionary, Captain and now Documentarian Tom Ellis, presents his program, Building the Thomas E. Lannon (See above.)
Using historic footage meticulously captured by award winning videographer Al Viator, shot as The Will to Build, between Oct. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997, Tom Ellis has crafted his personal story of the creation of the Schooner Thomas E. Lannon from dream to design , through the challenges of construction to the triumphant sail into Gloucester Harbor.

Admission: $8 members, $10 nonmembers

Light refreshments will be served.

For additional information, visit our website: www.essexshipbuildingmuseum.org

Office phone # 978-768-7541

Schooner Roseway

Schooner Roseway ©Kim Smith 2013

Click to view larger

While searching though my photo library, I discovered a batch of stills from the Schooner Festival that I have not yet posted because I was so intent on editing the Schooner Festival video. I’ll try to post them this weekend–if everyone hasn’t already had enough of schooner photos!

The Schooner Roseway is a National Historic Landmark, owned and operated by World Ocean School, which is located in Camden, Maine. She is a gaff-rigged schooner and was first launched from Essex in 1925.  The Roseway runs sails out of Boston during the summer and out of Savannah, Georgia and St. Croix during the winter months.

If you have sailed on the Schooner Roseway, I would love to know about your experience. Please leave a comment in the comment section. Thank you!

History of the Roseway from the World Ocean School website: 

In the fall of 1920 a Halifax, Nova Scotia, newspaper challenged the fisherman of Gloucester, Massachusetts, to a race between the Halifax fishing schooners and the Gloucester fleet. Therefore many schooners, such as Roseway, built at this time were not strictly designed for fishing but in order to protect American honor in the annual races.

Roseway, 137′ in sparred length, was designed as a fishing yacht by John James and built in 1925 in his family’s shipyard in Essex, Massachusetts. Father and son worked side by side on Roseway, carrying on a long New England history of wooden shipbuilding. She was commissioned by Harold Hathaway of Taunton, Massachusetts, and was named after an acquaintance of Hathaway’s “who always got her way.” Despite her limited fishing history, Roseway set a record of 74 swordfish caught in one day in 1934.

Read more about the history of the Roseway here

 

Video: Time Lapse Parade of Sails Through Gloucester Inner Harbor

The taller ships start appearing around 1:50, but I liked seeing all the smaller boats, too. Look for the Stanley Thomas lobster boat closer to the beginning. After the Parade I walked out onto the rocky ledge near the Eastern Point Lighthouse, but as you can see in the second-to-last clip, a thunderstorm was on the way and I had to skedadle.

Beautiful Event to film-to many of us, Gloucester is our “somewhere over the rainbow.”

Adventure Sails! More From The GMG Community

James Lowell Submits-
And then came the highlight- Gloucester’s own Adventure

photo-4


Len Burgess Photos-

Some photos of the Adventure taken from the schooner Ardelle Sat. morning.
The closeup of the people on deck shows how many it takes (between 20 and 30 of them) to raise the foresail.
Len Burgess

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Hi Joey,

The Adventure had her 2nd shakedown sail on Saturday. Donny King was kind enough t o take me out his Scotia Girl so I could take some pictures. Here are a few, plus a couple from onboard during the 1st shakedown sail.

Mary Barker

The Adventure's head, jumbo and fore sails The Adventure under way

 


Lannon Ryan and Wood Rum and Old Cuban Cigar Factory Cigar Cruise

My buddy James Eves from Cape Ann Giclee writes in-

Hey Joey,

I can’t thank you enough for spearheading the 2013 Rum and Cigar Cruise on the Lannon. I saw the post on GMG about 6 weeks ago and thought that I should buy a ticket. I yelled from my desk to Anna, “Hey, I think I’ll buy a ticket to the Rum and Cigar Cruise”. She agreed. (lucky for me, my wife, partner and muse encourages me to take time to enjoy the benefits of living in heaven). So, I bought a ticket.

I tried to get some work done today, but really spent most of my time in anticipation of the cruise. I stopped pretending to work at about 4:30 and headed down to the dock at five. I was first on line for the 6:00 cruise and watched the unloading of passengers from the previous sail. I met Mimi, An older woman (she told me her age but made me promise not to reveal her secret). She is from Haverhill, but the highlight of her year, every year, is spending a few weeks in Gloucester. We do live in the best place on earth.

Mimi left and I watched the Lannon crew prep the ship for the next cruise.

After a reasonably short wait they started loading the ship. I walked down the ramp and onto the deck. I was there greeted by a young woman from Old Cuban Cigar Company who handed me two fine cigars. I lit my first one immediately. Once we were all aboard the Captain spoke of safety and what to expect on the cruise around Gloucester harbor. He then introduced the Old Cuban Cigar guy who told us just how fine the cigars we were smoking were. He, in turn, introduced us to Bob Ryan of Ryan & Wood Distillery. Bob and his wife proceeded to dole out rum the likes of which few get to enjoy. 

With the strong smoke and smooth drink my work life faded to a blurry haze. Then I was able to truly appreciate where I was and see the beauty of Gloucester Harbor.

It was a beautiful night with a strong wind. The crowd on the boat were all GMG FOBs so I felt right at home. I was, however a bit disappointed that Joey C wasn’t there. Then I heard some cheers from the back of the boat and then saw Joey arriving in a small inflatable to starboard. “well”, I thought, “the party now begins”. and so it did.

I must say, how grateful I am to you, Joey, for your enthusiasm and the role model you are for those of us in Gloucester who truly strive to grow our community through our business and our lives. I was quite a treat to watch from the bow as you circled the boat and brought the party to life.

It was indeed a beautiful cruise. It felt timeless. 

Once docked there was talk of an after party at Stones. I’d never been. ( I know it odd but I am fairly new to Gloucester.) The party continued there and I could see that the cruise had washed away the hard days work for more that just me.

Wow, What a perfect night, only in Gloucester!!

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Amistad From Mary Barker

Hi Joey

The Amistad’s captain, Greg Bailey, was gracious enough to allow me onboard to take some photos.

2 of his crew, Whitney and Scott, were kind to give me a tour and some education.  The Amistad is such a

gorgeous historical boat, in such a wonderfully historic port.  She is absolutely a must see while she is visiting.

The Amistad is docked on the Harbor Loop at the Maritime Center, near the Ardelle.  Here are a few photos.

Mary Barker

Amistad Capt. Greg and USCG Michael Bergmann

Captain Greg Bailey with Michael Bergmann USCG

Amistad from stern

Amistad from the stern

Amistad stern from midship

Amistad stern from midship

Amistad midshp

Amistad midship looking aft

Amistad bow with crew Whitney

Amistad bow from midship with crew member Whitney

Below deck on the Amistad-

Amistad berthsAmistad crew Scot in Mav CenterAmistad foc'sleAmistad storage

ELSIE and BLUENOSE, Start of the First Race

from verso:  "Start of the first race of the Internatonal Race, showing 'Elsie' in the lead with Bluenose in rear."  1921, Halifax Nova Scotia

From the collections of the CAPE ANN MUSEUM, Gloucester, Massachusetts

“Start of the first race of the International Race showing ‘Elsie’ in the lead with Bluenose in the rear” 1921 Halifax, Nova Scotia

Thanks to  Fred Buck for locating this photograph and sharing it with the Gloucester Schooner Festival committee.

From A Race for Real Sailors  The first ELSIE – BLUENOSE RACE.

_________ The two fairly flew across the water, all sails filled in the stiff quartering breeze and hulls rolling heavily in the deep chop.  “The end of Bluenose’s 80-ft. boom was now in the water, now halfway up to the masthead as she gained on her rival.  The Elsie rolled still harder and three times brought her main boom across the Bluenose’s deck, between the fore and main rigging.”  It was a constant battle for the weather berth, with members of both crews either handling lines or working aloft or hugging the windward rails.  Anyone daring to raise his head above the weather rail on Bluenose caught the caught the edge of Walter’s caustic tongue.  __________

A Race for Real Sailors is in stock at the Cape Ann Museum. 

The stirring and poignant tale is illustrated with 51 historical photographs and five maps, and rounded out by a glossary of sailing terms and an appendix of the ever-changing race rules. This is a story that will keep even confirmed landlubbers pegged to their seats, a tale of iron men and wooden ships whose time will never come again.

Al Bezanson

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