Tag Archives: Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle

The Rosa Rugosa Is Starting To Come Alive

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Here is a resurrection of one of my favorite posts from the early days of the blog for the new folks (I post this once a year because I dig it so much and there are so many that join the ranks of GMG followers each year I’think this one is worth reposting for them-

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it  but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it.”

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

“All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it  but that’s what gives this plant its character. “

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Click the Image Below For A project I did back in ‘08 chronicling the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle throughout the year in a slideshow

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Sister Felicia Rosa Rugosa Rose Petal Jelly Entry For The Topsfield Fair

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Rosa Rugosa Rose Petal Jelly

After capturing the life cycle of the rosa rugosa and documenting it throughout the year in the early stages of GMG I thought it would be cool to film a segment of how the Rosa Rugosa Rose Hips are made into rose hip jelly.  Having neither the time this time of year to tape her or the cooking skills on any level to do it myself who else would I turn to but my sister Felicia?

What I didn’t know is that people not only made jelly from the rose hips (the round fruit that is left after the petals drop), but also the rosa rugosa petals.  She made both for entry into the Topsfield Fair.  When you enter a canning product you have to include a recipe sheet and the instructions are very specific for what they want and how you put them into certain classes.  We added a 25 picture collage of the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle on the recipe sheet to give our entry a little extra punch.

Felicia is going to tape a segment on how to make it with Gianni Gallo and Joe Langhan for The Gloucester Times Recipe On Demand.  So look for that soon.

2 cups water
3 cups unsprayed pink rose petals, thicker tissue at base of petals removed
2 1/2 cups rosa rugosa petal infused sugar
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
3 ounces liquid pectin
1 tablespoon rose water

Rosa Rugosa- Still Blooming Into September

IMO there in no more beautiful plant/tree/shrub.  It thrives in horrible condition, provides sweet fragrance and flowers all summer long.  Where can you find it?  All along our coast

Sept 1,2010-

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 DSC09732 Here is a resurrection of one of my favorite posts from the early days of the blog-

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

"There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it."

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

"All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. "

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Click the Image Below For A project I did back in ‘08 chronicling the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle throughout the year

in a slideshow

 image

Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Update 11/16/08

I’ll update the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Slide Show for tomorrow.  Here’s the latest pic from the series-

Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Update 11/16/08, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it.”

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

“All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. “

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Update 11/16/08

Here’s the latest in my yearlong chronicling of the lifecycle of my favorite plant and what I think should be adopted as Gloucester’s official flower- The Rosa Rugosa.  Click this text a couple pages worth of updates to the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle category.

Hips Left after Rose Petals Fall Off

Click this text for the link to my tribute to Rosa Rugosa

Click this text for my Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Slide show

In the right of the picture you can see the rose hip which is what is left after the flowers fall off of the stems. The rose hips are the fruit which people used to make jam out of in the old days. In a couple months the rose hips will turn orange-red from the present green color.

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