Tag Archives: Marine Industrial Flowers

The Rosa Rugosa Is Starting To Come Alive

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Here is a resurrection of one of my favorite posts from the early days of the blog for the new folks (I post this once a year because I dig it so much and there are so many that join the ranks of GMG followers each year I’think this one is worth reposting for them-

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it  but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it.”

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

“All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it  but that’s what gives this plant its character. “

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Click the Image Below For A project I did back in ‘08 chronicling the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle throughout the year in a slideshow

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Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle 12/27/10

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Here is a resurrection of one of my favorite posts from the early days of the blog for the new folks-

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

"There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it."

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

"All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. "

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Click the Image Below For A project I did back in ‘08 chronicling the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle throughout the year

in a slideshow

image

Rosa Rugosa- Still Blooming Into September

IMO there in no more beautiful plant/tree/shrub.  It thrives in horrible condition, provides sweet fragrance and flowers all summer long.  Where can you find it?  All along our coast

Sept 1,2010-

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 DSC09732 Here is a resurrection of one of my favorite posts from the early days of the blog-

I grew up one street from the Back Shore.

Although my mother might disagree, I’d say I was a bratty teen who didn’t appreciate the natural beauty that was steps from my doorfront. Part of that beauty was driving every single day along the Back Shore to get wherever we were going. If we left the house it was inevitable that we would be driving along the beautiful coastline that is the Back Shore.

It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to understand how blessed I was and how beautiful a place Gloucester is. Sure it is flawed in many ways but there is no place I’d rather be in the late spring, summer and early fall. Looking back it seems so crazy that I could have taken it all for granted but once you move away for a little stint and come home then you understand how lucky you were to call Gloucester your home.

Getting back to the Tribute To Rosa Rugosa-

First read this plant profile from Hort.net-

"There is nothing more beautiful than the perfection of a rose in mid-summer. The glorious fragrance wafting up from perfectly formed petals make it clear why this is the flower of choice for many people. Unfortunately, to obtain the perfect rose one must often have the perfect soil, a perfect watering regimen, and a lot of time. To those of you who don’t fall into this category, I offer you Rosa rugosa.

It may sprawl a little more than the hybrid teas that we see nowadays, and the flower petals tend to flop this way and that. All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. Named for the wrinkled (rugose) surface of its glossy green leaves, this rose is a charmer that can soften and naturalize any area.

It’s a carefree rose, picky only about drainage. It will grow in salty conditions, shade, full sun, and poor soil, so long as it’s well-drained. Along the East Coast it even grows right in the sandy beaches!

There’s other reasons to grow this beauty besides the low maintenance. Large blooms cover this plant in early summer, giving way to sporadic blossoms up to the first frost. And Oh! The fragrance is sweet and pleasant, carrying for yards at a time. The blooms later give way to lucious brick-red rose hips so large that they look like cherry tomatoes. And if that weren’t enough, sometimes the yellow to orange to red fall color can be excellent!

If you have the space, this is the rose for you. There are many select cultivars available that will heighten the plant’s natural beauty. Choose one and you will never regret it."

Can there be any debate about how poetic it is that we have Rosa Rugosa all along our shorelines and around town? This beautiful plant gives us so much beauty and fragrance amid the worst possible conditions. It thrives despite the cold winters, hot summers and even grows in the sand.

This line from the Hort.net’s profile really drives it home-

"All in all, it often has a kind of shaggy, unkempt air about it but that’s what gives this plant its character. "

Isn’t that just perfectly fitting for Gloucester?

Click the Image Below For A project I did back in ‘08 chronicling the Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle throughout the year

in a slideshow

 image

Our Charlie Brown Kwanzan Tree Progress- Buds Are Popping

It won’t be long now til the tree is in full bloom.  I’m still debating whether to pull it and replace it with something that will grow better.  We got it and it hasn’t grown all that much in the four or five years we’ve had it and I’d like something that will really spread out and grow larger than what we’re getting out of this one.  the blooms on the Kwanzan are stunning though and each pod produces three distinct flowers when they pop.

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Bumble Bee Slide Show

Click on the picture to view the Bumble Bee slide show. 

 It was a pleasant surprise to come home from Naples and see all the trees in bloom and the grass green.  Bare trees are not my favorite thing.

Yesterday the bees were working furiously around the house so the Bean and I grabbed our cameras and took a mini photo safari (that’s what we call them anyway) around the house.  I was all about the bees and our kwanzaan cherry tree which is starting to bloom.  The Bean was more interested in taking pictures of the tulips and flowers.

The Bean says-

“I didn’t take any pictures of the bumble bees because I thought they were going to sting me.”

You can also check out The Bean’s Blog Here

Bumble Bee Slide Show, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

 

Barnacle Bouquet

In case you didn’t read the comments in the last Barnacle Bouquet post GMG’s Paul Morrison gave us a little biology lesson-

Fun things I learned back in Coastal Ecology at UMass Amherst in 1977. Barnacles have the longest penis as measured by ratio of the size of the animal. Since they can’t move this likely comes in handy. “Howdy neighbor!”

They are also hermaphrodites but I had to look that up. The member size I did remember.

Barnacle Bouquet, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

Things To Do- Cape Ann Garden Festival

Beauport

An Evening in Sleeper’s Garden

Cape Ann Garden Festival

Gloucester, Mass. – June 12, 2009 –  Historic New England’s Beauport , Sleeper-McCann House, located on 75 Eastern Point Blvd , hosts an evening reception to kick off a weekend of garden celebrations in conjunction with the tenth annual Cape Ann Garden Festival hosted by the Sargent House Museum .

The event, An Evening in Sleeper’s Garden, takes place on Friday, June 19,         6 p.m.– 8 p.m. Historic New England’s Property Care Team Leader, Benjamin Haavik will discuss the ongoing landscape work at Beauport, highlighting the restoration of the original terrace staircase built by Beauport’s creator, interior designer Henry Davis Sleeper.  Abridged house tours and light refreshments are available.

Admission is $15 for Historic New England and Sargent House members and $20 for nonmembers.  To register, please call (978) 283 – 0800 or email pgarro@historicnewengland.org.  For more information about and tickets for the other Garden Festival events, please visit sargenthouse.org.

Historic New England is the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive regional heritage organization in the nation. If offers unique opportunities to experience the stories of New Englanders through their homes and possessions. For more information visit

www.HistoricNewEngland.org.

Hilarie Holdsworth Photo Garden Tour

Hilarie Holdsworth Photo Garden Tour

From Judith Nast-

Hi Joey,
Great to talk with you and thanks for your help about putting up the
Garden Festival info and how to do a slide show.

Many thanks….
Judy Nast

10th Annual Cape Ann Garden Festival
This year The Sargent House Museum has  teamed up with Beauport and
Cape Ann Museum to offer a weekend of activities.

Friday night, 6/19, is a reception at Beauport overlooking Gloucester
Harbor with a talk about the recently
discovered garden stair and garden renovation by a staff member of
Historic New England. Drinks, appetizer, talk and short house tours
6-8pm. $20

Saturday, 6/20, is the Garden Tour from 10-4.  A self guided tour of 10
fabulous flower and herb gardens that feature sculptures, private quarries and
the many ocean vistas of Cape Ann.  Several of the homes are open for
visitors’ viewing as well.    Restaurant discounts available for ticket
holders.  $35

Sunday’s events are:
10 am    Join Kim Smith, author of Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities,
for a talk about designing a garden for people and pollinators.  Kim
is an accomplished designer, illustrator and author.  $15

11:30    Judy Hallberg will talk about Herb Gardens in 18th Century
New England and will included using herbs for lotions and salves.
She’s been involved in Ipswich’s restoration of 18th century herb
gardens and is an accomplished gardener and speaker.  It should be a
fascinating lecture with great ideas for using the herbs you grow (or
can grow!) for comfort and healing. $20

1:30    Docent-led tour of the exhibit at Cape Ann Museum of
Hutchinson’s paintings of local scenes….lots of floral motifs and
ocean views and exquisite work.  Free with a Garden Festival Ticket

3:00  Peggy J. Flanagan who teaches at a local college, will conduct a
workshop of the propagation and care of antique roses.  Bring a pair
of pruners and learn how to care for these lovely plants.  Everyone
gets a plant for your own garden.  $20

Join us for the whole shebang and just an event.  Tickets can be
purchased a la carte at sargenthouse.org

***Also, we have an online auction on Ebay running June 19-30.  Check
out the stuff!***

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