Tag Archives: hurricane

Guest Writer: Author JoeAnn Hart

What is the liquid equivalent of unearthed? Not unwatered. Dewatered? No. How about dredged? That’s more about muck than water, but for my purposes, it will work on a metaphorical level, as in, to dredge up the past. Gloucester did not feel the full force of Hurricane Sandy this fall, which gouged out New York and New Jersey, remapping their shoreline and reminding us that water may be unpredictable, but so, it seems, is land. Still, we got bruised just being on the sidelines, as massive swells spewed up heaps of seaweed along with the usual flotsam, our floating history. On Raymond’s Beach along the outer harbor, big ticket items included fish bins, net balls, blue tarps, and a beige rug.

 As Daisy ran up and down the beach sniffing out seagull wings, I gathered loose debris and moved it beyond the wrack line so it could be collected at a later date. Empty motor oil containers, rubber gloves, water bottles full of brown water, it seemed all I saw was trash. My friend, Jackie, who makes seaglass jewelry, once told me that you can look for seaglass or you can look for sea pottery shards, but you can’t do both at the same time. I was so focused on plastic I couldn’t see anything else, and nearly walked past a pale bisque figure the size of my middle toe.

Smooth as a pebble and blotchy with seaweed stains, this small seafarer had spent a lifetime under the concealing sea, maybe as long as a century, back when bisque dolls were commonplace. She is no longer that staid Victorian, but has undergone a sea-change. Naked, limbless, and marked with great age, she should be in a museum labeled “Salacia, Roman goddess of the sea.” Like other relics from an ancient world, the doll survived because she knew the great trick was to flow with the tide.

What of her past? She may have been left at the beach by a child, or fallen off a boat. Who says it was an accident? She could have been thrown out to sea by some snitty Edwardian toddler, or dumped as municipal garbage into the deep, as was our coastal custom not so long ago. She has holes at her shoulders where wire once allowed for movable arms, but salt ate the copper tendons, releasing first one arm from her body, then the other. The seas rolled her along the ocean floor, until one day she lost her head. Eventually she found peace wedged among the rocks, hidden by swaying underwater plants, with only a dull sheen of sunlight above. In time, her legs disappeared below her knees. No need for them in the place where legless creatures dominate. All the while, tidal sands brushed against her body, healing over the wounds and reducing her to a bare human essence.

Then a storm like Sandy comes along and changes the depth and nature of her sanctuary, shooting her back into the tides. How she materialized on Raymond’s Beach is a mystery. How I saw her is a miracle. Perhaps our eyes are programmed to spot a human form above all else. At any rate, she changed my focus. Seeing her nestled there in the sluice, the beach was no longer just a stretch of land where garbage comes to rest. Freshly washed by the outgoing sea, the wet sand glowed in the autumn light as gulls scoured the blinding waterline for morsels. Suddenly, instead of seeing nothing but garbage, all I saw was loveliness. I named the doll Sandy and took her home. She sits on the high ground of my desk, a lesson from Salacia’s realm: Do not just focus on trash, real or metaphorical, but keep your eyes and heart open for when random beauty comes washing up at your feet.

*

I hope you enjoyed JoeAnn’s beautiful writing. She is the author of the novels Addled and the forthcoming Float (Ashland Creek Press, February 2013). Float, set in coastal New England, involves the fishing industry, conceptual art, jellyfish, marital woes, and plastics in the ocean.

Send In Your “We Will Rebuild” Photos- Winner Of Poll Gets A Bag of My Favorite Coffee- Glosta Joe’s Perfect Storm!

Send in your entry to goodmorninggloucester@yahoo.com

First entry From Misti @GlostaJoes

We Will Rebuild!!!

Paul Morrison-

Frankenstorm: We Will Rebuild

Posted on October 29, 2012 by Paul Morrison & RD

My son the barbecue expert without fail leaves an empty Heineken on the barbecue. I woke up to this devastation this morning.  How will I break the news? We will get a FEMA loan and I promise-  We will rebuild.

The Bean and Snoop Maddie Mad Entry-

We Will Rebuild!

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Sandy downtown

I took a stroll down Main Street to Stacy Boulevard and back at around 1:30PM, and although more than half of the stores are closed, we were mostly just getting wind and light rain at that point.  The sea wasn’t even that choppy by the Fisherman’s Memorial. People were walking their dogs and driving around as usual.

A few bigger waves here and there, but nothing spectacular.

Joan of Arc is looking at the sky, saying to the storm, “Go ahead, make my day!”

Two hours later, the wind and rain are getting stronger…

- Fr. Matthew Green

 

 

 

17 Abandon HMS Bounty off N.C. coast

The HMS Bounty which was the feature ship in Gloucester’s Schooner Festival Last Summer was taking on water out at sea and it’s 17 person crew just abandoned ship.

Uhmmm does this not beg the question-

“WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING OUT TO SEA ON THIS BOAT WHEN THEY’VE BEEN FORCASTING THIS STORM FOR OVER A WEEK?”

Somebody’s got some splainin’ to do!

17 abandon stricken ship off N.C. coast

By NBC News staff

Seventeen people aboard a replica of the HMS Bounty abandoned ship early Monday while stranded at sea off the North Carolina coast, the U.S. Coast Guard said in a press release.

"The 17 person crew donned cold water survival suits and life jackets before launching in two 25-man lifeboats with canopies," the Coast Guard said in a statement.

The ship issued a distress signal late Sunday and was taking on water, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

The owner of the 180-foot, three mast ship — which was built for the 1962 Marlon Brando movie, "Mutiny on the Bounty" — lost communication with the crew and alerted the Coast Guard to the situation.

Here she is when she arrived in Gloucester Last Summer-

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UPDATE: Coast Guard responds to vessel in distress 160 miles from hurricane’s center

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard has received word that the crew of the HMS Bounty has abandoned ship approximately 90 miles southeast of Hatteras N.C., Monday.

The 17 person crew donned cold water survival suits and lifejackets before launching in two 25-man lifeboats with canopies.

The Coast Guard continues to monitor the situation and assess the weather conditions to determine the soonest Coast Guard aircraft or surface assets can be on scene to conduct effective rescue operations.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina initially received a call from the owner of the 180-foot, three mast tall ship, HMS Bounty, saying she had lost communication with the vessel’s crew late Sunday evening.

The Coast Guard 5th District command center in Portsmouth subsequently received a signal from the emergency position indicating radio beacon registered to the Bounty, confirming the distress and position.
An air crew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City launched aboard an HC-130 Hercules aircraft, which later arrived on scene and reestablished communications with the Bounty’s crew.
The vessel was reportedly taking on water and was without propulsion.  On scene weather is reported to be 40 mph winds and 18-foot seas.

More Pictures of the HMS Bounty In Gloucester Last Summer-

Gloucester Welcomes HMS BOUNTY

Posted on August 31, 2012 by Marty Luster


HMS Bounty coming to the Gloucester Schooner Festival

Len Burgess Submits-

September 1st & 2nd.

HMS Bounty…at one with the sea…global voyager…movie star…dedicated to preserving the fine art of square-rigged sailing.

      The HMS Bounty is one of the most famous ships in the world. Known for the storied mutiny that took place in Tahiti in 1789 on board the British transport vessel, the current Bounty, a replica, has survived to tell the tale. Built for the 1962 movie “Mutiny on the Bounty” with Marlon Brando, HMS Bounty sails the country offering dockside tours in which one can learn about the history and details of sailing vessels from a lost and romanticized time in maritime history. Since her debut in “Mutiny on the Bounty”, HMS Bounty has appeared in many documentaries and featured films such as the Edinburgh Trader in Pirates of the Caribbean Dead Mans Chest with Johnny Depp.

 

Shots from Hurricane Irene

Shots from Hurricane Irene

The Great New England Hurricane, Boston, 1938

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The Great New England Hurricane of September 1938 killed 600 to 800 people, damaged or destroyed 57,000 homes, took out 26,000 automobiles, and felled 2 billion trees. It was the first major hurricane to hit New England since 1869. In New York City, the East River surged three blocks inland. This photo was taken on Boston Common where the Ducklings sculpture is now.

Fredrik D. Bodin Bodin Historic Photo

82 Main Street Gloucester, MA 01930

info@BodinHistoricPhoto.com

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The Hurricanes Here! Already?

I’m Bumming!    That jerk, EARL is going to F up the weekend! But it’s “almost” hard to complain because of the great Summer we’ve had.

Here are some night shots I took at my favorite Hangout last night before the real Hurricane hits.

I can’t wait till Saturday Morning to get some shots of Joeys PORTA POTTY Heading to Nova Scotia.

The Hurricane Arrives 09/02/2010 8:45pm

The Grace Marie with the Schooner Alabama in the background

The Schooner Alabama docked at the Cruise Port 09/02/2010 8:45pm

Http://www.FrontieroGallery.com